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60 Minutes - Danish people the "happiest" in the world

Discussion in 'World News & Politics' started by naranjaynegro, Feb 18, 2008.

  1. Aviation09

    Aviation09 Sheriff

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    How do you know you wouldn't rather live somewhere else if you haven't been anywhere else? You might be happy here in Stilly, but you could much, much happier somewhere else for all you know! Traveling abroad and spending time with different nationalities has significantly changed my life (the most influential being an 87 year old German).
     
  2. osugrad08

    osugrad08 Deputy

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    Don't get me wrong I would love to travel to Europe and elsewhere, primarily Ireland. But that would be the extent of it, I know that I don't want to live anywhere else but Oklahoma. I got sick just living in Connecticut for three months.
     
  3. Aviation09

    Aviation09 Sheriff

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    I'm the complete opposite, I want to see everything as well as live abroad for some time. But hey, at least you like Wu-Tang.
     
  4. osugrad08

    osugrad08 Deputy

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    I guess all people are different.

    Yup. We do have at least one thing in common. :D
     
  5. naranjaynegro

    naranjaynegro Territorial Marshal

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    Here's an excerpt from an article I culled from YALE Online written in July of 2006 that speaks to immigration issues in Europe....

    **************************
    "Home Affairs and Justice European Commissioner Franco Frattini rightly concluded in October 2005 that “the walls of the European fortress are crumbling” and warned that “Europe cannot any more oppose barbed wire to desperation.” But the continent can't throw open its doors to all comers. Immigration, long the pet subject of far-right organizations, has become in most European countries a “bread-and-butter issue,” in the words of British Prime Minister Tony Blair. Immigration stirs social tensions generated by high unemployment and weak economies, fear of the social impact of globalization and EU enlargement, failure of integration policies and debates on multiculturalism and – since the Madrid and London bombings – threats of Islamist terrorism. According to most polls, over 60 percent of European citizens think that “there are now enough foreigners” within the Union.


    French opponents to the proposed European Constitution made efficient use of “the Polish plumber,” an ideological scarecrow embodying the fear that a flow of cheap labor, then coming from new and poorer East European members of the Union, would depress wages and weaken social protections. Fears of massive Turkish immigration also contributed to the treaty’s rejection. Europe's economic predicament is dire, more than that of the US, which confronts its own immigration crisis, because EU immigrants, legal or not, can enjoy the benefits of an already-fraying social safety net. Social tensions thus fuel the rise of xenophobic, populist groups, which in turn push governing parties to come up with tougher immigration policies.

    Reforms have recently been introduced in the UK, Germany and France – by far the three main destinations of immigrants – as well as Denmark, the Netherlands, Austria and Italy, which all aim to put a brake on immigration and control it. The new French law voted in June by Parliament, envisions a selective, skill-based immigration and a system of quotas. It cracks down on illegals, restricts family-reunion immigration, and requires would-be immigrants to take language and civic lessons. Criticized by human-rights advocates, immigrant-support groups and religious leaders, the policy also infuriates leaders of African states who denounce Sarkozy's “chosen immigration” as a racist “neo-colonial” policy, an attempt by rich countries at shopping for brains and hands to sustain their own prosperity, while building walls to keep out the huddled masses whose remittances are a major source of income for their native countries."
    ************************

    Some of this sounds eerily familiar......
     
  6. Aviation09

    Aviation09 Sheriff

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    Their immigrants speak Turkish, ours speak Spanish. Aside from that, I'd say it's pretty close.
     
  7. FrankStallone83

    FrankStallone83 Sheriff

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    Favorite dutch person ever....Sherriff Bart

    [​IMG]:D
     
  8. Erick

    Erick Master in the art of Gemütlichkeit

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    What sound familiar about it? We are trying to keep immigrants from getting into the country illegally. Our proposed legislation is in efforts to enforce existing laws and uphold the legal way of coming into America, not keep any group out.
     
  9. Aviation09

    Aviation09 Sheriff

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    There is a cultural barrier being put up between all Mexican immigrants and American citizens. The majority of them come here, work cheap labor, and do not assimilate into our culture. Many of them don't even bother to learn English. The same can be said for western European nations like Germany (turks) and France (muslims).
     
  10. naranjaynegro

    naranjaynegro Territorial Marshal

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    It said "crackdown on illegals"....you are starting to see a backlash from citizens concerning immigration both legal and otherwise.

    I was in the UK a few months ago and the locals were complaining about the POLES and how they have swept into the country (via EU rules of free movement) and are taking all the menial labor jobs and putting hardships on their social services network.
    I believe Romania and Bulgaria are in the EU now or are close to being admitted and the English are terribly afraid they will be overrun with people from these two countries and are putting limitations on the number of people that can enter from these countries.
     
  11. Erick

    Erick Master in the art of Gemütlichkeit

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    I agree with you.

    I understand their problem. Money is in short supply in Romania and they will flood any area that will have them. A good friend of mine is from Romania. It doesn't sound like a pleasant place.
     
  12. apollo883

    apollo883 Deputy

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    People all too often lead to confilicting opinions, which makes some people unhappy. Religion just happens to be what a lot of people have disagreements about.
     
  13. OSU Sig

    OSU Sig Federal Marshal

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    This is an excellent point and one that, as I travel internationally, I find myself more and more in love witth the USA. Yes, we have our warts but its still the only place I would want to live. I do believe its really healthy to see different perspectives and in the end, I think people everywhere generally want the same thing. People want to be happy. What I have found is they have different ways of going about it.
     
  14. Aviation09

    Aviation09 Sheriff

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    Perfect.
     
  15. naranjaynegro

    naranjaynegro Territorial Marshal

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    So drawing some conclusions from this....you think the USA is "backward" because we are a people of faith? Can I also infer that you are against Capital Punishment? I'm not sure how I understand the issue of "abortion-on-demand" as a political issue and not a social one.

    Europe is thoroughly a post-modern & socialist society....the USA is heading that way and is probably 20 to 25 years behind it in that regards.

    The one single difference is that most european countries are homogenous but they are gaining an influx of africans and Middle easterners that are causing them significant pain right now and certainly rocking their cozy, socialistic societies. Again, I submit that socialistic societies work great when the population is largely homogenous but when you introduce varying races and ethnicities you creat a society of haves and have nots.....when that happens and everyone is not contributing to society but some are drawing off of it that should be contributing.......it starts to unravel.
     
  16. osupistolwhip

    osupistolwhip Deputy

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    I would add that socialist programs works better the smaller the scale.

    Places with the lowest population like Cuba, Norway, Iceland have much better success than places with large populations like GB or Canada.

    Similarly, places in the US that have implemented more socialistic programs like San Fran & Hawaii have been fairly successful with what they have done. Again I think because it is on a local scale.
     
  17. desertpoke

    desertpoke Deputy

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    You equated that they were happy because of Socialism. So I took it one step further - If socialism brings happiness, then Totalitarianism must bring a constant state of euphoria.

    I argued that it's not the socialism making them happy, it was their general approach to their work life and a live and let live philosophy that lead to their happiness.

    If you somehow read that I think socialism is preferable, than you need to re-read my statement. I fundamentally disagree with socialism and I'd think that would be clear based on how many times I've mentioned it in the past.
     
  18. naranjaynegro

    naranjaynegro Territorial Marshal

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    Or maybe they're happy because of the cradle to grave socialist programs....knowing that they have a comfy safety net in which to fall should they ever stumble. Maybe 37 hr work week and 6 weeks vacation help out too?
     
  19. OSU Sig

    OSU Sig Federal Marshal

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    Must be a basic miscommunicaton between us and it may be my doing. I originally posted the 3 points which are not untypical of socialist environments, those being lower expectations, little or no drive to overacheive and government care cradle to grave. I think this follows your points about their approach to work life and the live and let livie philosophy.
     
  20. NZ Poke

    NZ Poke Cowboy

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    Honestly, my #1 biggest worry about moving back to the US would be going back to the 2 weeks a year of vacation. I get 4 now (became a law in NZ in 07) and it's just so much better, your work/life balance improves loads. At my job after 2 years there you get 5 weeks a year of vacation.

    I'd rather make/have less money and have more vacation time.

    I realize I would adapt to 2 weeks vacation a year, but f*ck, that's 10 weekdays a year of paid vacation.......10 days of out of 365!!!! WTF?!?!?!?

    Americans are soooooo overworked, esp considering a shockingly high percentage don't even take their 2 weeks.

    Vacation season is upon us, and a new survey by employment firm Hudson says more than half of American workers fail to take all their vacation days. Thirty percent say they use less than half their allotted time. And 20% take only a few days instead of a week or two. Among so-called extreme jobholders—what author Sylvia Ann Hewlett calls the professional class panjandrums—42% claim they have to cancel vacation plans "regularly." Americans take even less vacation than the Japanese, the people who gave rise to karoshi—the phenomenon of being worked to death.

    http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_21/b4035088.htm
     

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