Coronavirus pandemic non-socio-political discussions

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SLVRBK

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I have learned a crapload about adaptive immunity in the past few months. Immunology and infectious disease are NOT my specialty, which is cardiovascular medicine. However, this is fascinating. Maybe inactivated HCoV could be used as a vaccine like inactivated polio was?
I am interested to see the response once this is published.
 

RxCowboy

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May 29
Kim Harris Fletcher is feeling positive.

Its the Friday data dump. And this one looks just as good as all the rest have this week! 188,665 tests have now been resulted and of those we have only added 68 new positive COVID Oklahomans to our list, for a total of 6338. Of those 68 cases, 24% or 16 cases are from the OKC metro. Oklahoma county had 13, Cleveland county added 2, and Canadian county added 1. Tulsa added 23 new cases, and Texas county continues to slow and only added 2 cases.

We currently have 79 confirmed COVID patients in the hospital and the patients under investigation/awaiting testing have now decreased to 81. The number of recovered patients continues to climb and sits at 84% or 5340 patients today. 329 patients, sadly, never recovered.

The number of positives this week is very encouraging as this is now starting the 4th week of the reopening program. The expected spike continues to elude us, and if by next week hasn't occurred, it is very unlikely to. As last week was a rush to get the testing done for prison systems and nursing homes, we saw an unexpected increase on a couple of days of reporting. Now that those out of character spikes have been explained and accounted for, the daily data looks much more consistent.

Things are going well in the Sooner state, and with that I say, enjoy the beautiful day! Surprise someone with unexpected kindness today. Stay well.
 

RxCowboy

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May 29

COVID-19: Friday the 29th
Numbers, numbers, numbers, oh and waste water. I got a bit lengthy today so I apologize. C-ya Monday.

1. It has been another week and the United States has added roughly 100k cases and 10k additional deaths. The global number should hit 6 million cases today. A good place to track how your county is doing is, oddly, the Weather Channel app. They have added a COVID-19 icon which will show your county and how the numbers are changing week over week in your area.

2. I have seen a lot of confusion and debate over the numbers with some quoting really low infection rates and some really high. This primarily is a result of people misusing or misunderstanding what they are quoting, or using the wrong terms to express things, so I thought I would explain the most common ones I am seeing misused/confused. Pardon the length of the explanation. There are three basic rates I am seeing used/confused: mortality rate, infection fatality rate and case fatality rate. Before we start I am going to use the flu as a point of reference for a couple of reasons. One -most of us are pretty familiar with the flu, two flu is also a disease where we have to estimate a lot of the numbers related to how many people have it because it isn't reportable, so like COVID, we don't know for sure. Here we go. Mortality rate (MR) tells us out of everyone in America, how many of them died of COVID. Our current MR is 0.03%. Influenza is typically 0.1% - higher as a mortality rate. Things that impact that are: 1)quarantine, 2) our medical professionals have done a great job keeping deaths low - check out our deaths per 1 million compared to other nations as an example of that, and 3)quarantine. Yes, I said it twice lest we forget the entire purpose of quarantine was to keep mortality low. Mission accomplished. Next, Infection Fatality Rates (IFR) tells us of everyone who has COVID what % die, this includes symptomatic (those actually sick) and asymptomatic (carriers). We have 0 way of knowing this right now but that has not stopped people from guessing. And they are guesses. I have seen some crazy guesses calculated ways that are inappropriate but based on the most sound scientific guess, the IFR for COVID is estimated anywhere from 0.3 - 0.5% depending on where you live. The 1.3% IFR that is going around is based off calculations that are, in my opinion, flawed. Flu has an IFR of 0.05% which is lower than COVID making COVID more deadly. But BOTH are based totally on estimates because we don't have hard numbers and these calculations should not really be used. A more reliable method is Case fatality rate (CFR). CFR tells us of those who develop symptoms, how many will die. Now this too is an estimate because there are lots of people who get the flu and don't go to the doctor, just as there are people who are sick with COVID and haven't gone in or been tested. But it is a more accurate comparison and we have better numbers. CFR for COVID is currently 5.8% - Flu is 0.13% much lower than COVID. Now...these numbers fluctuate every time there is a case added or a person dies. So tomorrow they will be different. Also, they are crude numbers, meaning we didn't adjust for anything - so in some populations they will be higher, some lower. And this is a simplified explanation. And of course, they are all based on what we know and there is a lot we don't know. This is how epidemiology works. The numbers change, our information changes, things change. Information is flowing fast and furious and it will never be 100% right in 100% of cases. But people are cherry picking which numbers to compare i.e. mortality rate compared to IFR etc. and/or are using the wrong term to explain the numbers they are sharing. So beware of that.

3.You may have heard that there is debate if 6 feet apart is enough. If you review back through my posts you will see we discussed this early on, there has always been debate with some estimates suggesting we need to be 15 feet apart and others recommending 9. I have seen everything in between up to and including 20 feet. The reason for this discrepancy is super spreaders. Super spreaders are people who spread COVID at a higher rate than the average person would. So if the R0 is 3 (1 person spreads it to 3 more who each spread it to 3 more) a super spreader would perhaps spread it to 20 (randomly chosen number to illustrate the point but they have found numbers as high as 60). Super spreaders actually emit more than the 1000 droplets we have been discussing this week. Some super spreaders actually emit up to 10k droplets per minute. They, of course, have no idea they are a super spreader nor would you. And if you are with one, 6 feet isn't enough. But...there is no way to know that and super spreaders seem to be the exception, not the rule. Certain behaviors, as we have discussed, can make anyone spread more virus further - (projecting your voice or yelling, singing, coughing, sneezing). These can actually emit droplets up to 20 feet in indoor conditions that are just right. Don't miss the "just right" part. So if you find yourself in a situation where those activities are happening, maybe leave a little more room between yourself and others but don't stress about this one.

4. Remember when we discussed that they could detect COVID in wastewater? Well, states all over the country are looking to implement that and are hopeful it will be an active surveillance technique by fall. Finland, Germany and the Netherlands have already started doing this. We are currently doing testing in a variety of places to make sure the test works, they hope to have that done by the summer's end. This will allow us to "see" if levels in an area are rising about 1 week before a resurgence. There is still no definitive answer to if sewage can spread it, so wastewater employees will need PPE.

FINAL THOUGHTS: All of this fighting is exhausting. Let's just not. Don't engage. Turn the other cheek and let them have the win today. Your mental health will thank you. Take the high road, be the bigger person, save your breath, keep your blood pressure down and today, just for today, let it go. (you're singing the Frozen song now aren't you?) Enjoy your weekend and ignore the noise. We have made it another week.
 

RxCowboy

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June 1

COVID-19 Monday June 1st Update
It was a quiet weekend in the world of COVID news and for that I am grateful.

1. Several new studies came out officially showing that shelter in place orders/quarantine worked to reduce the case counts and slow the spread. Hospitalizations were much lower than worst case scenarios too, due to SIP orders. The researchers suggest we continue to keep the number of people we are in direct contact with low to keep the spread low. Current recommendations are keeping your contacts less than 50% of your normal. Referenced studies are available in JAMA and Annals of Internal Medicine.

2. New Haven, Connecticut is now measuring their sewage for signs of the virus and have found they can detect increases in spread about a week before a surge. This may soon become common practice.

3. There is a new theory that you are contagious for about 11 days after symptoms start. This only applies to people with symptoms (we don't have a solid number for how long asymptomatic people are spreading it yet). This is also just a theory although it is based on early scientific evidence. This will most likely vary slightly from person to person but it is a starting point. More to come on this one.

4. A study in Louisiana found that while African Americans were more likely to become ill from COVID-19 they were not more likely to die from it. The study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

5. Other countries have returned children to school without major issues among children under 12, although in some schools teachers have gotten ill and in at least one case the school had to re-close because so many teachers got sick. Overall, opening schools back in the fall, with some social distancing protocols in place, seems likely for America. Certainly we will want to take some precautions to protect our teachers.

FINAL THOUGHTS: Today is a new day, a new week, and the start of a new month. Let's resolve to start it filled with hope for better things to come. Set aside fear, anxiety and anger. We have grieved for what was - now, let's embrace what can be. Let's look for the positives, for the promise of a better tomorrow. Let's be guided by faith, hope and love.
 

RxCowboy

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May 27, 2020
Association of Stay-at-Home Orders With COVID-19 Hospitalizations in 4 States
Soumya Sen, PhD; Pinar Karaca-Mandic, PhD; Archelle Georgiou, MD

JAMA. Published online May 27, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.9176

In analyses of the effectiveness of response measures to the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), most studies have used the number of confirmed cases or deaths. However, case count is a conservative estimate of the actual number of infected individuals in the absence of community-wide serologic testing. Death count is a lagging metric and insufficient for proactive hospital capacity planning. A more valuable metric for assessing the effects of public health interventions on the health care infrastructure is hospitalizations.1 As of April 18, 2020, governors in 42 states had issued statewide executive “stay-at-home” orders to help mitigate the risk that COVID-19 hospitalizations would overwhelm their state’s health care infrastructure. This study assessed the association between these orders and hospitalization trends.
 

RxCowboy

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Reviews 27 May 2020
Hydroxychloroquine or Chloroquine for Treatment or Prophylaxis of COVID-19: A Living Systematic Review
Adrian V. Hernandez, MD, PhD, Yuani M. Roman, MD, MPH, Vinay Pasupuleti, MD, MS, PhD, et al.
https://doi.org/10.7326/M20-2496

Abstract
Background:
Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine have antiviral effects in vitro against severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2).

Purpose:
To summarize evidence about the benefits and harms of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine for the treatment or prophylaxis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Data Sources:
PubMed (via MEDLINE), EMBASE (via Ovid), Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, bioRxiv, Preprints, ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and the Chinese Clinical Trials Registry from 1 December 2019 until 8 May 2020.

Study Selection:
Studies in any language reporting efficacy or safety outcomes from hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine use in any setting in adults or children with suspected COVID-19 or at risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Data Extraction:
Independent, dually performed data extraction and quality assessments.

Data Synthesis:
Four randomized controlled trials, 10 cohort studies, and 9 case series assessed treatment effects of the medications, but no studies evaluated prophylaxis. Evidence was conflicting and insufficient regarding the effect of hydroxychloroquine on such outcomes as all-cause mortality, progression to severe disease, clinical symptoms, and upper respiratory virologic clearance with antigen testing. Several studies found that patients receiving hydroxychloroquine developed a QTc interval of 500 ms or greater, but the proportion of patients with this finding varied among the studies. Two studies assessed the efficacy of chloroquine; 1 trial, which compared higher-dose (600 mg twice daily for 10 days) with lower-dose (450 mg twice daily on day 1 and once daily for 4 days) therapy, was stopped owing to concern that the higher dose therapy increased lethality and QTc interval prolongation. An observational study that compared adults with COVID-19 receiving chloroquine phosphate 500 mg once or twice daily with patients not receiving chloroquine found minor fever resolution and virologic clearance benefits with chloroquine.

Limitation:
There were few controlled studies, and control for confounding was inadequate in observational studies.

Conclusion:
Evidence on the benefits and harms of using hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine to treat COVID-19 is very weak and conflicting.
 

RxCowboy

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June 2

Covid-19: Tuesday June 2nd
Numbers, Swabs, Meds and Monkeys - yep monkeys, because this is 2020 and that is how it rolls.

1. Numbers in the United States are looking good. Well, relatively speaking. We have stayed around 20k new cases daily. We still haven't hit 2 million total US cases. Things are slowing down on the COVID front which is good news.

2. Some places have moved away from nasopharyngeal swabs (a deep swab of the nose and the throat, typically done as two swabs) going to buccal (inside the cheek) only swabs. But a small cohort study is calling that into question finding that about 18% of buccal only swabs give a false negative and it can take up to 8-10 days longer to get a positive result in buccal only swabs making them an inferior testing method.

3. Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are back in the news with some providers suggesting they may be effective in some cases and shouldn't be ruled out as a possible treatment in those cases. So people are looking at that option. Keep in mind we need various levels and options of treatment. People with mild symptoms don't need the same level of treatment as severe cases and not all treatments will work for or be appropriate for all patients (consider underlying health conditions, other medications the treatment may interact with, biological differences etc.). Research is ongoing for the variety of needs and while some are ruled out quickly, others are showing promise.

4. Monkeys in India attacked a lab technician that was transporting COVID-19 blood samples. They stole the blood samples and fled. Don't despair, while monkeys can get sick from the virus it doesn't appear to be fatal to them. Current theories are that the monkeys were starving and thought the package may be some form of food. Quarantine of the humans has left less food around for them - similar to what we have seen with the rats in NYC.

FINAL THOUGHTS: What a year this is turning out to be. Locust, monkeys, disease, riots, storms, UFOs, murder hornets. There is so much noise right now. Maybe you need to quiet the noise and slow things down. Give yourself permission to turn it all off, social media, the news, all of it. Turn it off and soak in the beautiful sound of silence. Let it penetrate your soul and bring you rest so that when you have, you can continue to be light and hope and love.
 

RxCowboy

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June 4

Covid19: Thursday June 4th Update
MIS-C, Copper, Numbers, Apple Watches and Darth Vader.

1. Remember MIS-C? The syndrome affecting children that is associated with but not actually COVID? There have now been 2 fatal cases reported globally, (one in NY, one in the UK) and over 300 cases total in the US. It appears to be impacting children ages 2-15 the most; boys are more likely to get it.

2. I was asked about Copper lined masks so I thought I would share that information. Copper naturally has anti-microbial effects. It is also efficient at killing bacteria. Covid-19 comes from a virus not a bacteria. There is no evidence that copper lined masks will protect you from Covid-19. None. But...copper has been proven effective against other viruses and the Covid virus can survive less time on copper than on other metal surfaces - but we are still talking hours, not minutes or seconds. Getting a copper lined mask won't hurt but there isn't any evidence it will help either. Research has begun to see just what if any protection it could provide. Remember, the more layers any mask has the more protection it provides to those around you. I do recommend having more than one mask per person in your household so they can be allowed to hang undisturbed or be washed between wears, both of which will kill the virus.

3. Some Numbers: 67.6k healthcare providers have contracted Covid-19 in the United States. 331 have died. Also a reminder that while those at highest risk for dying are the elderly and those with co-morbidities, the majority of cases are among those ages 18-64, with those 18-44 having the highest range. See chart in comments.

4. While Covid-19 is a primarily respiratory disease, a study published in The Lancet, found that over time, it also launches an attack against the lining of the blood vessels. This is pretty unheard of but explains why blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease put a person at increased risk of severe cases and why symptoms are so wide spread across body systems. On a positive note, Apple watches with EKG capabilities seem to be pretty effective at detecting the QT interval issue that Covid-19 (among other things) can cause with the heart rhythm.

5. In Finland bakeries are staying afloat by selling cakes that look like TP, but don't try to wipe with it. And in the Philippines officials are dressing like Storm Troopers and Darth Vader to enforce quarantine and hand out relief packets. So there's that.

FINAL THOUGHTS: Today I want you to know that you matter. What you do matters, who you are matters and how you treat others matters. You are loved, you are important and you are valued. Believe that.
 

RxCowboy

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June 5

COVID-19: Friday, June 5th TGIF!
Numbers, New Zealand, Montana, Vaccines and Masks

1. Let's take a look at the US numbers for the week. Total cases in the US went from 1.76 million last Friday to 1.92 million today, that is an increase of 160k new cases over the week - up from the week before (140k new cases). But deaths were down for the week with only 6.8K new deaths (down from 10k deaths the prior week).

2. New Zealand reports their 14th consecutive day of no new cases. This is big news and according to most standards would mean they are clear of the disease. They do still have 1 active case in the country but the person is in isolation so this could very well be the end of the outbreak for them. They are the first country to reach this milestone. You will want to watch them over the next month to see how it goes.

3. Montana saw their biggest one day case numbers in over a month. At 14 new cases that isn't that many, but for them it is. All cases were concentrated in just 3 counties which is good. We will continue to monitor to see if there is something happening in Montana or just a fluke.

4. There are 95 vaccines currently in clinical development around the world. To be approved a vaccine must go through 3 phases of testing. Phase 1 is safety testing among a small number (10-50) of people (is the vaccine safe). Phase 2 is verifying the immune response (does the vaccine illicit an immune response) in a larger group of people (in the hundreds) and Phase 3 is typically conducted on a large group of people (in the thousands) to verify the vaccine actually protects you (i.e. creates enough of a response to protect you from the virus). Safety is, of course, monitored in all three phases. Typically this takes years. As you can imagine scientists around the world are watching this process closely to make sure that while it is being fast tracked, it is still being done well.

5. Face masks - as we get out and about I thought I might offer reminders regarding current recommendations on face masks. With 40-80% of all Covid being spread by people who aren't experiencing symptoms and don't know they have it, masks help protect against the virus and slow the spread. Masks do not replace the need for hand washing -and after removing your mask you should immediately wash or sanitize your hands. Masks are needed in places where social distancing is difficult. When making masks at home a combination of fabrics is most effective and tighter woven cloths are better. You may remember our candle test? Children under 2 shouldn't wear one nor should people who have trouble removing it by themselves or those with breathing problems like COPD or emphysema.

NOTE: next week I will have limited access so my posts will be less frequent. I am aiming for M,W,F.
FINAL THOUGHTS: Another week has come and gone. I want to offer the Friday reminder to turn off the news this weekend and just live your life. Enjoy your friends and family. Take your pet for a walk. BBQ. Go fishing, mow your lawn, do a puzzle. Try out a new recipe. Step away and renew, it isn't selfish, it isn't weak. It is needed and necessary and you have earned it.
 

RxCowboy

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June 8

I have uploaded this twice - maybe this time it will take?
COVID-19 Monday June 8th
Blood types, semen, numbers, cleaner and a twist of Lyme.

1. Five studies from five different countries are all in pre-print status (not yet peer reviewed) but they all say the same thing. Blood type matters. Type A+ is more likely to get COVID and have more sever complications. Type 0 is less likely. Some studies actually said 0 was unlikely. These are pre-print so we need to consider it that way but the number and diversity of the study locations were enough for me to mention it.

2. The US hit 2 million cases over the weekend. Peru is being hit very hard right now and is experiencing an oxygen tank shortage. The Middle East, South American and Africa are also all on the rise. But New Zealand has been the first country declared COVID free! There is hope.

3. Poison control calls are up because roughly 1/3 of Americans are gargling with, bathing in, or cleaning their food with cleaning solutions. Don't do that, it's dangerous.

4. Can COVID be passed through semen? We don't know yet. Two studies, two different results. More research is needed.

5. For vacation options amid COVID, this summer, people are renting or buying RVs and taking to the roads. If the road leads you out into the woods, beware of ticks. No one needs a twist of Lyme with their Corona - at least not the virus version. Ticks have to be on you for 36 hours to transmit the disease (Lyme) so make sure you get them removed (with tweezers) as soon as possible.

FINAL THOUGHTS: Monday is here, ready or not. It can drag you kicking and screaming into the day or you can go with it, embracing it as an adventure to see where it leads. Either way, it is going to happen. But perhaps, the adventure route will result in a better day for you and those around you. Adventure awaits. C-ya Wednesday, if possible.
 

SLVRBK

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June 8

I have uploaded this twice - maybe this time it will take?
COVID-19 Monday June 8th
Blood types, semen, numbers, cleaner and a twist of Lyme.

1. Five studies from five different countries are all in pre-print status (not yet peer reviewed) but they all say the same thing. Blood type matters. Type A+ is more likely to get COVID and have more sever complications. Type 0 is less likely. Some studies actually said 0 was unlikely. These are pre-print so we need to consider it that way but the number and diversity of the study locations were enough for me to mention it.
So...about 45% percent of the population has almost no concern?
 

SLVRBK

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WHO official: Asymptomatic spread of coronavirus 'very rare'
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...navirus-very-rare/ar-BB15cBHW?ocid=spartanntp

A top World Health Organization official on Monday said that it appears "very rare," for an asymptomatic person with coronavirus to transmit the virus to another person, a potential bit of good news in the fight against the virus.

"From the data we have it still seems to be rare that an asymptomatic person actually transmits onward to a secondary individual," said Maria Van Kerkhove, the WHO's technical lead for COVID-19, when asked about the issue at a press briefing.

She noted the answer is not definitive. "We are constantly looking at this data and we're trying to get more information from countries to truly answer this question," she said. "It still appears to be rare that an asymptomatic individual actually transmits onward."

She said the WHO has information reported by countries that have not been published in studies, finding that detailed contact tracing has not found significant spread from asymptomatic people.

"We have a number of reports from countries who are doing very detailed contact tracing, they're following asymptomatic cases, they're following contacts, and they're not finding secondary transmission onward," Van Kerkhove said. "It's very rare. Much of that is not published in the literature."

However, Ashish Jha, director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, expressed some skepticism of the WHO's claim and said he thinks asymptomatic transmission is, in fact, an important source of spread, and that some modeling shows as much as 40 to 60 percent of transmission is from people without symptoms.

Jha said it's possible the WHO is making a distinction between asymptomatic spread and presymptomatic spread when someone eventually develops symptoms but spreads the virus before they do.

If it is indeed true that asymptomatic spread of the virus is very rare, it would make it easier to contain the transmission, because there would be less worry about people unwittingly spreading the virus as they went about their lives without any symptoms.

"If this turns out to be true it would be a game-changer, but I think it would be really important for us to know whether CDC concurs?" tweeted Peter Hotez, an infectious disease expert at Baylor University, in response to the WHO statement on Monday.

Van Kerkhove said the focus should be on tracking the symptomatic cases.

"If we actually followed all of the symptomatic cases, isolated those cases, followed the contacts, and quarantined those contacts, we would drastically reduce [transmission]," she said.
 

SLVRBK

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Can't read the whole steady yet. But, from the abstract, risk-wise, A > non-O > non-A > O.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...lood-type-plays-role-in-virus?mod=djem10point

23andMe Provides More Evidence That Blood Type Plays Role in Virus

Research from genetic-testing giant 23andMe Inc. found differences in a gene that influences a person’s blood type can affect a person’s susceptibility to Covid-19.

Scientists have been looking at genetic factors to try to determine why some people who contract the new coronavirus experience no symptoms, while others become gravely ill. In April, 23andMe launched a study that sought to use the millions of profiles in its DNA database to shed light on the role genetics play in the disease.

Preliminary results from more than 750,000 participants suggests type O blood is especially protective against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, the company said on Monday. The findings echo other research that has indicated a link between variations in the ABO gene and Covid-19.
 

RxCowboy

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https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...lood-type-plays-role-in-virus?mod=djem10point

23andMe Provides More Evidence That Blood Type Plays Role in Virus

Research from genetic-testing giant 23andMe Inc. found differences in a gene that influences a person’s blood type can affect a person’s susceptibility to Covid-19.

Scientists have been looking at genetic factors to try to determine why some people who contract the new coronavirus experience no symptoms, while others become gravely ill. In April, 23andMe launched a study that sought to use the millions of profiles in its DNA database to shed light on the role genetics play in the disease.

Preliminary results from more than 750,000 participants suggests type O blood is especially protective against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, the company said on Monday. The findings echo other research that has indicated a link between variations in the ABO gene and Covid-19.
ABO are phenotypes.
 

RxCowboy

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June 10

Covid-19 Wednesday the 10th Update
The WHO, testing issues, modeling, healthcare workers and a vaccine.

1. The WHO has joined the CDC in recommending wearing masks. They specifically say they recommend 3 layered masks. They also made a comment regarding people who were asymptomatic not spreading the disease based off isolated observations of transmissions they saw when contact tracing. These were not scientifically backed statements and would conflict with their mask recommendation and it conflicts with what several large studies have shown.. They rolled that statement back today.

2. A study published as a nature preview used modeling to estimate the quarantines and shutdowns saved 3.1 million lives across 11 European countries lowering the rate of transmission by 82% across all countries.

3. Covid-19 PCR tests (the ones testing active cases) have at least a 20% false negative rate according to Johns Hopkins. They estimate that 4 days after getting the virus 67% of people will have a false negative test result and is similar at 3 weeks. 8 days post infection - which is about 3 days post symptoms, you get the most accurate results (which is where the 20% false negatives are). So if you start to have symptoms, day 3 is the best time to test and get accurate results.

4. Healthcare workers are reporting high levels of post traumatic stress (49%), depression (24%) and anxiety (19%) (all numbers rounded).

5. The first human clinical trial for a vaccine has completed phase 1 (is it safe). You may recall phase I is typically small and designed specifically to test safety. The vaccine uses a common virus that they have attached some SARS-CoV2 proteins to. (so it doesn't actually use SARS-CoV2) this is a pretty common vaccine technique. We don't know if it works yet but they are moving into phase II.

FINAL THOUGHTS: Quarantine was rough, but it saved lives and for that you should be proud. It wasn't easy and it got old, but you did it! For some, it wasn't an option, they had to keep going out into the unknown. They didn't have the option to stay in and keep themselves and their families safe. They too should be proud of what they have done to help keep us afloat. It worked. We did well, all of us working together, doing our part. Thank you. Thank you for the sacrifices you have made and for all the things you didn't say when you really wanted to. Thank you for all the times you spoke up and gently corrected misinformation. Thank you for the kindness you showed and the hand you reached out to others. Thank you for sacrificing your comfort. Thank you, you played a part. You made a difference.
 

RxCowboy

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June 12

Covid-19 Friday June 12th
Numbers, fruit workers, dry climates, hunger and cows.

1. Friday numbers. The US added 17 million cases this week and 6 thousand new deaths. Since Memorial Day, 19 states have seen increasing case numbers and 9 are seeing increases in hospitalization rates. Texas had record hospitalizations this week and Arizona has averaged over 1k new cases a day.

2. There are early reports that the virus is spreading among fruit and vegetable workers in the US. This could create worker shortages similar to what we saw in the meat industry. Stay tuned for more info on this situation.

3. The virus doesn't seem to do as well in warm, dry environments according to a model in Mumbai. They think the droplets can't survive as long when the air is dry - it causes the virus to dry out faster so it has less time to spread. So keep those dehumidifiers running.

4. Adults living with children under 18 are more likely to report they don't have enough to eat in their homes during the pandemic or are having concerns about paying their mortgage or rent. 55% report having at least one adult in the household out of work due to the pandemic. Across all households, 48% report at least one adult being out of work due to the pandemic and 10% of people are struggling to get enough food.

5. Cows may be the key. In South Dakota a biotech firm is proposing to use cows to mass produce antibodies against the virus. They give the cows a vaccine of sorts then expose them to the virus and the cows mass produce antibodies which can then be used in the treatment against Covid. Farm animals don't get COVID so the cows don't actually get sick. Clinical trials will be starting soon. As you can imagine this is new and quite controversial.

FINAL THOUGHTS: It's Friday and no matter what this week has brought, today wraps it all up and the weekend is on the horizon. Let's make it a great day.