Covid-19

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wrenhal

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Aug 11, 2011
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Here's some interesting information about deaths. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/...3dOYEjt8o-5eNS7pYK1vZsimsF1pGW8KGwxcnSMAfBOVo



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Looks like Oklahoma is doing much better that the national trend on increase in overall deaths. Was early 2018 a really bad flu year?
I didn't drop the data down that far, but I do seem to remember it being bad that year.

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Jun 18, 2010
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If you all didn't get a chance to watch...this speech from the RNC talks about sports and covid.
https://youtu.be/2LM98qaa1OI
I listened to the whole thing. He said we still have a long ways to go. But other Republicans say the pandemic is past. It's over. So Trump might as well lead the way by resuming holding nearly maskless rallies, like he tried to start in Tulsa. I feel sure many Republicans on here would strongly agree.
 

Rack

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I listened to the whole thing. He said we still have a long ways to go. But other Republicans say the pandemic is past. It's over. So Trump might as well lead the way by resuming holding nearly maskless rallies, like he tried to start in Tulsa. I feel sure many Republicans on here would strongly agree.
I watched nearly every speech (in the evenings on delay) and I don't recall ANY Republican saying it's over. The first lady specifically addressed it as a challenge as did many others. Maybe someone implied it was a thing of the past, but I honestly don't recall that specific language. They did talk about initial responses however, so I agree that some did imply enough to make you think they said it was over. It's just not that cut and dry. Many of the speakers did talk about it some. It wasn't the main theme, maybe it should have been more of one considering.
 
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oldguy

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Sep 12, 2008
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Here is the data for the annual leading causes of death in Oklahoma from 2017

OK Leading Causes of Death, 2017 Deaths
1. Heart Disease 10,772
2. Cancer 8,203
3. Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease 3,035
4. Accidents 2,563
5. Stroke 1,947
6. Alzheimer’s disease 1,752
7. Diabetes 1,398
8. Suicide 756
9. Chronic Liver Disease/Cirrhosis 670
10. Flu/Pneumonia 625

So if you double the Covid-19 cases to allow we are somewhere between Diabetes and Alzheimers.

80% of the dead were 65 or older and probably had some part of numbers #1, #3, #7 AND #9.
 
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SLVRBK

Johnny 8ball's PR Manager
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Oct 16, 2003
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Interesting article from the Washington Post regarding Covid resurfacing in Europe:

Coronavirus cases in some European countries are rising again, but with fewer deaths. For now.
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/worl...er-deaths-for-now/ar-BB18tipL?ocid=spartandhp

Excerpts:

Coronavirus cases are surging again in Europe after months of relative calm, but the second wave looks different from the first: Fewer people are dying, and the newest and mostly younger victims of the pandemic need less medical treatment.

Spain has been hit particularly hard, with per capita cases now worse than in the United States — a notable marker in Europe, which after the initial springtime spike had generally controlled the virus more successfully than America.

They have masks and gloves for their doctors and nurses. And as summer travelers return home and classes resume, experts and leaders say they hope to be able to avoid bigger lockdowns in the coming months, although some fear a hit from schools and the impending winter flu season.

At least part of the surge in cases may stem from testing that is far more widely available than it was in the spring. Younger people who have moderate symptoms are being encouraged to get tested, unlike in March, when only those who were sick enough to get hospitalized qualified for a test in most countries.

“I don’t think the country can survive another lockdown. And to be frank, there is no reason to,” said Ranieri Guerra, a World Health Organization assistant director general who is advising the Italian Health Ministry.

This time, the European approach seems more American: decentralized, localized, a hodgepodge of individual measures that policymakers hope will add up to a pandemic that is kept in check. In Belgium and France, for example, mask-wearing is now required in many cities facing a second wave. Belgian authorities earlier this month asked citizens to drastically curtail their social interactions, limiting their close household contacts to a “bubble” of just five other people.

The country’s (Spain) prime minister, Pedro Sánchez, has rejected the idea of a new national lockdown and said that conditions and knowledge of the virus have improved since the spring. Short of a lockdown, smaller measures have been taken, including the closure of nightclubs. The region of Madrid has delayed the return to school for some students and further reduced its planned class sizes.

France imposed one of Europe’s strictest nationwide lockdowns between mid-March and mid-May, and authorities have since said that another lockdown would not be necessary and that a second period of closures would be devastating for the economy.

“To overcome the health crisis, we must learn to live with the virus,” President Emmanuel Macron said earlier this week.