Covid-19

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Mar 11, 2006
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For those arguing that schools should not be in-person. There are A LOT of data points that strongly indicate that kids should be in-school. I like this comparison.
https://twitter.com/andrewbostom/status/1304113982949687296?s=21
 
Mar 11, 2006
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For those thinking that sending young people to college was a bad idea or for those thinking that colleges should close or go all virtual.
https://twitter.com/andrewbostom/status/1304013285369483266?s=21
 
Sep 22, 2011
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For those thinking that sending young people to college was a bad idea or for those thinking that colleges should close or go all virtual.
https://twitter.com/andrewbostom/status/1304013285369483266?s=21
The only issue is did they infect anyone else who was hospitalized or died?
 
May 4, 2011
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The only issue is did they infect anyone else who was hospitalized or died?
A few things here. First, this guy is mostly a conservative commentator who is not in any way affiliated with Brown epidemiology, though he does have a MD with extra research training and has previously done research in a completely unrelated area that has separate methodologies from infectious disease (kidney transplants).

https://www.brown.edu/academics/public-health/epi/about/people/faculty

He's only affiliate faculty in family medicine, which probably means he helps teach some rotations. That's not the same as their core faculty who have absurd research and innovation profiles.

https://familymedicine.med.brown.edu/who-we-are/faculty

Second, he's leaving out schools that have had hospitalizations. It's still a tiny number, but not fully accurate. He says the distinction is that the hospitalization occurred from a student who didn't attend classes but did attend other college social activities (per his twitter).

We won't know the answer to your question for another week or two once we're able to piece apart data on college towns and look for evidence of secondary spread (secondary cases should be popping up now with a couple weeks of high spread in colleges and with hospitalizations to follow later). Individual cases are not the same as good data. For what it's worth, I'm not convinced the secondary spread is going to be that bad, but my epidemiology training all focuses on public mental health. So, I have no real expertise on this.

Finally, he seems like an anti-masker, even calling them "child abusive" despite a growing consensus that they have modest, but consistent effects.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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AP Story from yesterday titled “Teacher Deaths Raise Alarms as New School Year Begins”.

This article and title is pure panic-porn. This is nothing more than fear-mongering.

The article says teachers in three states have died. However, let’s investigate. Not one of these teachers in this article even taught one single minute this school-year.

1) Teacher in Potosi, MO: Article states this teacher “died Sunday after three weeks in the hospital.“ However, her school didn’t open until August 24th and she had been in the hospital since at least August 16th. Only towards the end of the article is that fact slightly mentioned. C This teacher was NEVER in class this school-year.

2) Teacher in Oxford, MS: Died August 6th. He got sick a couple of weeks before school started. This teacher also was NEVER in class this school year.

3) Teacher in Columbia: Died three days after being diagnosed. Her COVID diagnosis was the day before school started. This teacher also was NEVER in class this school year.


https://www.yahoo.com/news/teacher-deaths-raise-alarms-school-204308793.html
 

cowboyinexile

Have some class
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Jun 29, 2004
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AP Story from yesterday titled “Teacher Deaths Raise Alarms as New School Year Begins”.

This article and title is pure panic-porn. This is nothing more than fear-mongering.

The article says teachers in three states have died. However, let’s investigate. Not one of these teachers in this article even taught one single minute this school-year.

1) Teacher in Potosi, MO: Article states this teacher “died Sunday after three weeks in the hospital.“ However, her school didn’t open until August 24th and she had been in the hospital since at least August 16th. Only towards the end of the article is that fact slightly mentioned. C This teacher was NEVER in class this school-year.

2) Teacher in Oxford, MS: Died August 6th. He got sick a couple of weeks before school started. This teacher also was NEVER in class this school year.

3) Teacher in Columbia: Died three days after being diagnosed. Her COVID diagnosis was the day before school started. This teacher also was NEVER in class this school year.


https://www.yahoo.com/news/teacher-deaths-raise-alarms-school-204308793.html
I get that you are trying to push a narrative but it doesn't change the fact that people will continue to die from this.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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In fact, yes you are. I pointed this out some time ago.
View attachment 85562
It remains at interesting, and sad, take that stating facts is pushing a narrative.

Although not exactly a fresh take, unfortunately. Why people refuse to learn from data is beyond me. Anyone who continues to advocate for public schools to be closed, or college campus to close and be all virtual, is just being blind to data and being a huge disservice to others.
 

Donnyboy

Lettin' the high times carry the low....
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Oct 31, 2005
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I get that you are trying to push a narrative but it doesn't change the fact that people will continue to die from this.
People die it is the only certainty in life. The headline is written in a way to induce fear over the return to school despite the fact it only highlights three deaths so literally 1 in a million since there are three million teachers in the US.....the deaths are not geographically close so one area may be dangerous but others may be completely safe to return....and the deaths could in no way be linked to the return of school since none of them occurred due to activities at any school.....and no mention of the fact we still aren’t discussing that the entire world regardless of response is attending school without significant consequence. The story and the headline are dishonest. Whatever you feel about the poster of his thoughts on covid the headline is dishonest at best and it’s part of a larger narrative at worst. There is no defense of the story.
 
May 4, 2011
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No, no, no, no, no, no, no! College kids don't infect anyone else. College kids R0<1!

The virus is strangely selective, depending on which group it is that is being looked at and who is doing the looking.
I agree that people are too cavalier in dismissing infections among this group (my university just announced a hospitalization of a staff member and another staff member died a couple weeks ago). At the same time, the massive testing and tracing program at Illinois, which has largely failed because many students don't quarantine after testing positive, has found that transmission to their two cities has been minimal. Not zero, but my understanding is less than 12 secondary community infections from hundreds of on campus infections. Its preliminary data and could change, but we'll need to be open to the idea that colleges may be insulated enough to prevent massive community spread. That's particularly a concern now that students are already there and sending them home will likely pose a greater community transmission risk. I may disagree with how they came back to campus, but they're there now at many schools and the question becomes what are the best next steps for preventing community spread? That's an issue where I've seen elite epidemiologists have disagreements.

As an example, in its last reporting period, OSU has averaged about 30 cases over the past ten days and Payne county only averaged 48 during that span. That difference is slightly less than what Payne county had in June when they peaked at a 21 new case rolling average, but more than July when they averaged about 10 cases a day without students. That said, OSU does an absolute garbage job of publishing data and makes the comparison hard. I'm honestly ashamed my alma mater looks to have one of the worst reporting platforms of major state universities. A few comparisons....

Oklahoma state:
https://go.okstate.edu/coronavirus/statistics.html

OU
https://www.ou.edu/together/dashboard

KU
https://protect.ku.edu/covid-19-test-reporting

K State
https://www.k-state.edu/covid-19/communities/

Even Texas Tech updates theirs more regularly, though theirs is only slightly better than OSU
https://www.depts.ttu.edu/communications/emergency/coronavirus/

Alabama, who has appropriately caught a lot of crap for their large outbreak, gives better timeline data and better breakdowns.
https://uasystem.edu/covid-19-dashboard/