Gundy’s comments today

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Sep 10, 2010
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I seem to recall Steve Dennis from that show in the past taking favorably about the rant but I could be wrong. I just thought it was an interesting take from two guys who Probably don’t have a bias for or against OSU. Perhaps with Cowlishaw it goes back to his days with the Oklahoman.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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I'm sure everyone else is thinking this, but is it possible Gundy may be a modern day Nostradamus? May 1 for coaches and the state is reopening May 1. Scary accurate.
The data is sure showing that Gundy is probably a leader here. Multiple Governors are now publicly talking about reopening states. Amazing that just in a few short days the bozos from PFB are looking like extreme idiots.
 
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Apr 7, 2006
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Since you asked for a comparison...
Rough Comparison of Flu to Covid for people that contract. This is my memory from a couple reports and numbers vary by report.
Flu: death rates <0.1%, hospital rate 2-3%, length of hospital stay 2-3 days. Average person infects 1.3 other people.
Covid: death rate 3%, hospital rate 11-19%, length of stay in hospital >12 days (11 days on ventilator, 10 in ICU). Average person infects up to 2.5 people.
This is based on a test rate that pales in comparison to the flu also- so there's no way of knowing whether the numbers are remotely accurate yet.
 
Jun 16, 2008
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The 11 days on a ventilator stat he gave is flat out wrong, also. Simply not true.
So what is it then?

That was from a USA TODAY report comparing the two and was based on Washington State's and Wuhan statistics. If I find it again I'll link it. I think it was an if placed on ventilator thats how long they would be expected to remain on it.

Yes the overall rates are probably off because not everyone is tested... but that's the case both, I know I've had the flu and have never been tested for it, plus flu has a vaccine that reduces severity for those that do contract it.
What i was trying to point out was the difference in severity by comparison. Or you can just say its not that bad and is just getting overblown and exaggerated.
 
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ScooberJake

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Jul 13, 2004
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Since you asked for a comparison...
Rough Comparison of Flu to Covid for people that contract. This is my memory from a couple reports and numbers vary by report.
Flu: death rates <0.1%, hospital rate 2-3%, length of hospital stay 2-3 days. Average person infects 1.3 other people.
Covid: death rate 3%, hospital rate 11-19%, length of stay in hospital >12 days (11 days on ventilator, 10 in ICU). Average person infects up to 2.5 people.
Here's another difference. I have a close family member who is immunocompromized, a young otherwise healthy mother of 3 young kids. She probably got a flu last fall, but there is no coronavirus vaccine. I am not willing to put her and millions others like her at unknown risk so we can have football. Risk is not unavoidable, and maybe by the fall we will have treatments and/or more data to help us understand the risk better.
 
Mar 27, 2020
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Something that health Czar Gundy hasn't considered is that if one player or staff member gets this virus they shut the entire place down to sanitize it. L.A. Rams center Brian Allen was diagnosed and they closed the entire training center down for 2 weeks. With lawsuits just begging to be filed you can imagine the fear among athletic directors. All the universities need now is to pay out a bunch of million dollar lawsuits. They really need to get this thing right. You don't just quarantine the herd and move on.
As far as those who seem to think this is just like the flu, I dont remember in all my many days that even in the worst flu season seeing bodies put in refrigerated trucks, or mass graves being dug or the military sending doctors and nurses to the hot spots. Some day, hopefully in the near future this thing can be treated just like the flu but that day is not now and won't be for some time to come.
 

Rack

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Oct 13, 2004
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Something that health Czar Gundy hasn't considered is that if one player or staff member gets this virus they shut the entire place down to sanitize it. L.A. Rams center Brian Allen was diagnosed and they closed the entire training center down for 2 weeks. With lawsuits just begging to be filed you can imagine the fear among athletic directors. All the universities need now is to pay out a bunch of million dollar lawsuits. They really need to get this thing right. You don't just quarantine the herd and move on.
As far as those who seem to think this is just like the flu, I dont remember in all my many days that even in the worst flu season seeing bodies put in refrigerated trucks, or mass graves being dug or the military sending doctors and nurses to the hot spots. Some day, hopefully in the near future this thing can be treated just like the flu but that day is not now and won't be for some time to come.
The news doesn't sensationalize the flu, plus this is different in that it is new...also the bodies were set aside in most instances to do two things, to contain them together to prevent the spread of something novel until they determine what to do with them, AND, perhaps, to sensationalize the issue. When you have something new you cannot treat it like the flu in the beginning so I agree with you there...What I don't agree with you is that we are in some sort of stuck position for a long period of time. We have seen now that it's mitigated and declining in most areas, we have seen also that it's LIKELY not as deadly as we once thought. We have also treated it successfully with several methods and are working on several vaccines that I've read about. As far as lawsuits and overreactions, it seems as the society further declines into a litigious one, that we have decided that everything that happens to us is someone else fault when the fact is, we are each responsible for our own actions...including weather we decide to play football or not....IF we decide to play football things can happen to us, like get a virus or the flu and die, or get hit and paralyzed for life. This things are not the fault of anyone else, even if they expose us unknowingly or make a normal football play on our bodies. Bottom line, it's just as dangerous to society to shut down and become immobilized (I'd argue more dangerous), as it is to move forward with caution. All should start to agree on this soon, it's just a matter of degree of forward movement that is up to debate. Fear is a paralyzing thing, it completely takes over those inflicted with it and keeps them from being any use to themselves or anyone else in their lives. Let's not let fear cripple our society for any longer than it has already. Btw, the repeated Coach bashing makes you look like a one trick pony...Move on, Americans are NOT going to let themselves be immobilized by this too much longer...the sooner we snap out of our collective fear, the better.
 
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Rack

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Here's another difference. I have a close family member who is immunocompromized, a young otherwise healthy mother of 3 young kids. She probably got a flu last fall, but there is no coronavirus vaccine. I am not willing to put her and millions others like her at unknown risk so we can have football. Risk is not unavoidable, and maybe by the fall we will have treatments and/or more data to help us understand the risk better.
She should stay home...very simple fix. Those who are not immunocompromised or simple don't want to live their lives in fear, should be able to make their own choices for themselves. It's dangerous to drive or ride in a car, automobile accidents kill about 40,000 every year in America. It's not up to you to mitigate all risk from our lives, I believe it's up to us to live our lives in freedom and provide hope, not fear. Regarding moving forward, that is what we are all talking about...because we are starting to have treatments and more data exponentially and daily. We are starting to understand the virus and how to mitigate it without only using avoidance to do so. Certainly we need to be careful, but there is currently good evidence that we can start to continue our normal lives in a safe and orderly fashion. Inovation is what enables you to move on, fear paralizes.
 
Jun 16, 2008
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The news doesn't sensationalize the flu, plus this is different in that it is new...also the bodies were set aside in most instances to do two things, to contain them together to prevent the spread of something novel until they determine what to do with them, AND, perhaps, to sensationalize the issue. When you have something new you cannot treat it like the flu in the beginning so I agree with you there...What I don't agree with you is that we are in some sort of stuck position for a long period of time. We have seen now that it's mitigated and declining in most areas, we have seen also that it's LIKELY not as deadly as we once thought. We have also treated it successfully with several methods and are working on several vaccines that I've read about. As far as lawsuits and overreactions, it seems as the society further deuterates into a litigious one, that we have decided that everything that happens to us is someone else fault when the fact is, we are each responsible for our own actions...including weather we decide to play football or not....IF we decide to play football things can happen to us, like get a virus or the flu and die, or get hit and paralyzed for life. This things are not the fault of anyone else, even if they expose us unknowingly or make a normal football play on our bodies. Bottom line, it's just as dangerous to society to shut down and become immobilized (I'd argue more dangerous), as it is to move forward with caution. All should start to agree on this soon, it's just a matter of degree of forward movement that is up to debate. Fear is a paralyzing thing, it completely takes over those inflicted with it and keeps them from being any use to themselves or anyone else in their lives. Let's not let fear cripple our society for any longer than it has already. Btw, the repeated Coach bashing makes you look like a one trick pony...Move on, Americans are NOT going to let themselves be immobilized by this too much longer...the sooner we snap our of our collective fear, the better.
Attempting to restart too early and rapidly convert easily cause a repeat of what has already been seen causing longer delays, increased fear and economic impact than simply waiting and more cautiously restarting. It needs to be in a very region specific manner with that decision made based on the ability to handle a flare-up. Nationwide sports can not start until all regions participating are able to be opened up again.

There is a very big difference in being hurt playing the game or practicing in an intelligent manner than having warnings and medical advice ignored (similar to strength and conditioning programs that kill people) it is the responsibility of those in charge to protect the people in their charge.

I am normally a big defender of Gundy but he's wrong on this one in my opinion. The country is not ready to open up for football.
 
Oct 30, 2007
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With lawsuits just begging to be filed you can imagine the fear among athletic directors. All the universities need now is to pay out a bunch of million dollar lawsuits. They really need to get this thing right. You don't just quarantine the herd and move on.
Athletic directors are in a really tough position. They're going to lose tens of millions of dollars from television revenue if football isn't played. Some smaller football programs could end up going under if that happens.

I'm not really sure how this plays out. They may have to ask the athletes to sign legal documents stating that they understand & accept the risks of playing in this environment. Hopefully things will improve significantly over the next few weeks and it will make this decision easier.
 
Sep 23, 2010
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Poverty kills more people than Covid every year. And we are sending more people to poverty every day with this. This is why Gundy speaks of the millions of dollars at stakes for the state and the athletic department. It's a matter of life and death as well.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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https://www.tulsaworld.com/sports/c...cle_e351944b-ce48-5218-a0b5-9e535be2e7b7.html

“Our players are students,” Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby told CBSSports.com. “If we’re not in college, we’re not having contests.”



“If things are all virtual and if you can’t have kids on campus, can you justify the risks of having athletes on campus?” American Athletic Conference commissioner Mike Aresco told USA Today. “We’re an extension of the educational system.”
“The first question for us is, ‘Will our campuses be reopened?’ That’s the starting point for everything here,” Swarbrick told Notre Dame broadcast partner NBC Sports. “We can engage in all of the scenario planning we want, but our first piece of critical information is, ‘Will our colleges and universities be open on time in the fall?’”
 

Jostate

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Jun 24, 2005
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Poverty kills more people than Covid every year. And we are sending more people to poverty every day with this. This is why Gundy speaks of the millions of dollars at stakes for the state and the athletic department. It's a matter of life and death as well.
It's harder to see the direct cause and effect, or quantify it, but I suspect you're right.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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Athletic directors are in a really tough position. They're going to lose tens of millions of dollars from television revenue if football isn't played. Some smaller football programs could end up going under if that happens.

I'm not really sure how this plays out. They may have to ask the athletes to sign legal documents stating that they understand & accept the risks of playing in this environment. Hopefully things will improve significantly over the next few weeks and it will make this decision easier.
How many of the non-revenue generating sports are going to take a hit here?

I think you'll see, for awhile at least, the end of some of the flat out ridiculous travel in college athletics. We've just grown to accept it as standard operating procedure, but when you step back & look at the travel costs for some of the minor sports to go play in front of nobody, it's really absurd.
 
Oct 30, 2007
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How many of the non-revenue generating sports are going to take a hit here?
https://www.espn.com/college-sports...en-soccer-program-amid-widespread-uncertainty
There's no doubt this will happen. Cincinnati announced yesterday that they're dropping men's soccer. You'll see a slew of non-revenue sports cut if football isn't played this year.

I think it was a smart move to shut things down for a few weeks to flatten the curve & keep our healthcare system from being overwhelmed, but this can't last forever. Many people seem to be underestimating the fiscal impact of having our economy shut down long term.
 
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Jul 25, 2018
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https://www.espn.com/college-sports...en-soccer-program-amid-widespread-uncertainty
There's no doubt this will happen. Cincinnati announced yesterday that they're dropping men's soccer. You'll see a slew of non-revenue sports cut if football isn't played this year.

I think it was a smart move to shut things down for a few weeks to flatten the curve & keep our healthcare system from being overwhelmed, but this can't last forever. Many people seem to be underestimating the fiscal impact of having our economy shut down long term.
Furthermore, what would schools have to do if they cut the sport, but they're a P5 school who's guaranteed 4 years of scholarship to their student athletes? Wasn't that implemented a few years ago?
 
Oct 30, 2007
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Furthermore, what would schools have to do if they cut the sport, but they're a P5 school who's guaranteed 4 years of scholarship to their student athletes? Wasn't that implemented a few years ago?
https://www.wlwt.com/article/univer...ing-mens-soccer-program-permanently/32142981#
Scholarships for current men's soccer student-athletes will be honored for the duration of their academic careers. Student-athletes who would like to join another institution's roster will be released without penalty and free to transfer immediately.

It looks like Cincinnati is going to honor their men's soccer athletic scholarships. My guess is that most schools will do the same thing if they can. Most athletes are likely to transfer to another school where they can play though.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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https://www.wlwt.com/article/univer...ing-mens-soccer-program-permanently/32142981#
Scholarships for current men's soccer student-athletes will be honored for the duration of their academic careers. Student-athletes who would like to join another institution's roster will be released without penalty and free to transfer immediately.

It looks like Cincinnati is going to honor their men's soccer athletic scholarships. My guess is that most schools will do the same thing if they can. Most athletes are likely to transfer to another school where they can play though.
Agreed. This would affect non-starters the most, imo. By that I mean that they are going to have a tougher time finding a spot to land if they have to transfer.
 

Rack

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Oct 13, 2004
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Attempting to restart too early and rapidly convert easily cause a repeat of what has already been seen causing longer delays, increased fear and economic impact than simply waiting and more cautiously restarting. It needs to be in a very region specific manner with that decision made based on the ability to handle a flare-up. Nationwide sports can not start until all regions participating are able to be opened up again.

There is a very big difference in being hurt playing the game or practicing in an intelligent manner than having warnings and medical advice ignored (similar to strength and conditioning programs that kill people) it is the responsibility of those in charge to protect the people in their charge.

I am normally a big defender of Gundy but he's wrong on this one in my opinion. The country is not ready to open up for football.
Oh wise one, what are the risk for people in their teens and 20's to die, or be hospitalized by Covid-19?
Also, while you are at it, what are the risk for people in their teens and 20's dying in auto accidents?
Every time you walk out your door you take a risk...everything we do involves the risk of dying. How much do you allow it to control your life is your choice (at least it used to be)...when the government starts forcing certain choices due to unfounded fear, then we have issues. Despite the media driven fantasy that this is the plague, it's not, and the cure may indeed be worse than the problem.

What Gundy suggested was completely in line with protecting the people in his charge. He said we would test, we would isolate, we would do everything in our power to protect the young men. Once again, what's the rate of hospitalization and death in people in their 20's??...honestly I don't know, but I suspect that it's so low that the guys would be at FAR grater risk to have other things happening to them to cause death while in Stillwater than Covid-19 even if they didn't screen them.