NCAA Board Passes NIL

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Jul 25, 2018
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#1
https://sports.yahoo.com/finally-nc...s-to-make-money-on-their-names-142306697.html

After decades of digging in, battling in court, launching advertising campaigns or just shaking their collective head “no,” the NCAA’s Board of Governors has agreed to provide its athletes the same economic freedom as any other student on campus, starting in January 2021 at the latest. It still must clear a vote at the NCAA Convention, but board approval makes it all but inevitable.

“We approved legislation for student athletes to receive compensation for third-party endorsements,” said Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith.

The basics are simple.

If a company wants to hire a college athlete to promote its business, it can. This can range from small to big.

A campus town Ford dealer might give an appearance fee for the star quarterback to sign autographs in the showroom and drag in some potential car buyers. If the player is popular enough — think Tua Tagovailoa — then maybe the Alabama Ford Dealers use him in commercials and billboards. If he’s really big enough, Ford Motor Co. could do something nationally.

The player would be able to retain a marketing agent to handle the deals. The school would be separate and “guardrails” (that word again) will be put in place to keep boosters out of this in the recruiting process. Athletes also can’t use school logos or uniforms — similar to the NFL or NBA.

There’s more, of course. Social media is a monster now, so much of this may be done there rather than traditional routes. In a world where a Connecticut high schooler named Charli D’Amelio can amass 50 million-plus followers on TikTok in roughly six months — and make millions off it — whatever world the NCAA was living in was ancient.

Side businesses are allowed too. An athlete who is also a recording artist, or opens his or her own company that isn’t even sports-related, will finally be allowed.

Essentially, the best (or most popular) athletes will be able to cash in, the same way it is with Olympic athletes. Not every member of the USA Gymnastics team makes millions, but Simone Biles does and it has only aided (via marketing) not ruined her popularity.
 

OrangeFan69

LA Face with an Okla. booty.
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Apr 24, 2010
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#2
I like this rule; A majority of the people watch the games in person to see the stars on the field; not the buildings in the backgrounds. If schools want to pimp themselves out for millions on television; They should expect the individuals doing the heavy lifting get a piece of the action as well.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#3
I like this rule; A majority of the people watch the games in person to see the stars on the field; not the buildings in the backgrounds. If schools want to pimp themselves out for millions on television; They should expect the individuals doing the heavy lifting get a piece of the action as well.
They're waking up to the fact that the NBA G League may be beginning to load up on the top recruits & those kids will never even play a season of college ball. Forget his name, but the UCLA commit is going straight to the G league for $500k.

I think a lot of people support this for the kids, but I'm not sure how you police this, at all.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#5
https://sports.yahoo.com/how-much-w...stars-make-with-new-ncaa-rules-044937159.html

Interesting read that talks about how much a kid like Trevor Lawrence could make.

Another interesting angle to this is that states have different timelines right now & I don't think that's gonna work at all. For instance, Florida is set to move forward with this Jan 1, 2021, while Colorado isn't looking to start until 2023. That's a major advantage for Florida for 2 years. I can't imagine that the states can have different timelines on this.
 
Jan 13, 2008
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#6
So, local insurance guy/auto dealership, becomes a money funnel for local star recruit/player. There will be promises of certain endorsements for $xxxxxxx if you come play for us. So many things can go wrong with this.

I guess paying the players won't change in the SEC, just how it is delivered to them.
 

OSUCowboy787

Territorial Marshal
Dec 31, 2008
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#7
this is necessary but its going to kill the chance for MOST schools to make a run at a title. The top 15-20 schools will be competitive with sponsors available but the mid major and lower end power 5 schools will all continually be "Kansas'd" and never be able to compete in football with the big boys.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#8
https://www.espn.com/college-sports...incapable-policing-athletes-endorsement-deals

The vast majority of college athletic directors who responded to a poll do not believe the NCAA is capable of policing a potential future market for college athletes making money from endorsement deals.

There is a growing consensus among college sports stakeholders that an independent oversight board will need to be created to enforce new rules if the NCAA adopts a proposal to allow college athletes to make money from their names, images and likenesses. Those proposed rule changes, which were supported by the NCAA's board of governors in late April, would allow college athletes to make money while in school as long as the moneymaking ventures fit within a set of yet-to-be-determined "guardrails."

The NCAA rule-makers have not yet figured out what those guardrails would be, or who would enforce that no athlete or school steps outside of them. NCAA leaders such as president Mark Emmert indicated earlier this year that initial plans were leaning toward using the organization's current enforcement staff and campus-level compliance officers to fill that role. Roughly 85% of respondents to a recent poll conducted by Lead1 -- a professional association of athletic directors -- said they are "not confident at all" in the NCAA's ability to enforce its proposed rules, according to Lead1 president Tom McMillen.