Need help getting rid of devil’s spawn (Morning Glories)

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

ksupoke

We don't need no, thot kuntrol
A/V Subscriber
Feb 16, 2011
11,907
14,506
743
dark sarcasm in the classroom
#1
I’m desperate, last year, in my copious amount of free time, I dug up 4 root balls in a 50 foot area on the side of my driveway. That seems to be holding, this year I’ve got about a 200 ft run that is starting to strangle my Italian cypress’.
I’ve tried boiling water, 100% vinegar solution, unfortunately these things drink it like a 6 yr old puts away coors.
I’m really hoping there’s something other than tilling to find and then digging up the root balls. Any help would be greatly appreciated
 
Nov 16, 2013
4,208
2,273
743
34
tractor
#2
Get some toradon, make sure its a still day with low rain chances when you apply it. Toradon is not like roundup because it won't deactivate in soil, its a serious chemical that works well on vining pests. Put a half inch of water on the area when you see the plant start dying, in about four or five days. You want to give it plenty of time to reach the root ball. If its wild morning glory that came from the ditch roundup is not a guaranteed solution. The more you dig it up the more likely you are to keep tilling in the seeds. Don't use the toradon very close to the tree. Only use it when its still and don't use more than prescribed
 

ksupoke

We don't need no, thot kuntrol
A/V Subscriber
Feb 16, 2011
11,907
14,506
743
dark sarcasm in the classroom
#3
Get some toradon, make sure its a still day with low rain chances when you apply it. Toradon is not like roundup because it won't deactivate in soil, its a serious chemical that works well on vining pests. Put a half inch of water on the area when you see the plant start dying, in about four or five days. You want to give it plenty of time to reach the root ball. If its wild morning glory that came from the ditch roundup is not a guaranteed solution. The more you dig it up the more likely you are to keep tilling in the seeds. Don't use the toradon very close to the tree. Only use it when its still and don't use more than prescribed
Ok here’s a few pictures, where would I apply it
I have 3 of th IC’s on one end and 5 on the other each of them is separated by about 3 ft with about 120 ft or so between the groupings. I had to take down 3 that were in between because they were strangled out.
add: I tried roundup last year I also tried a variety of other weed killers before I decided to dig up the rootballs. I’ll be a sonofagun but I swear I think it helped them bloom and yea it’s wild.

I’m going to try this torodon before I start a 200 ft ditch.
I truly appreciate the assistance

E91FEB9F-D168-4D0A-89E3-CE0846C27BB3.jpeg
2B6C1DB9-8864-4DAF-AC33-04680DF42678.jpeg
D73954CB-06C2-4D2B-8DBE-D829BE6BDED2.jpeg


D73954CB-06C2-4D2B-8DBE-D829BE6BDED2.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Nov 16, 2013
4,208
2,273
743
34
tractor
#4
I would recommend using a brush to put it directly on the morning glory. If you get it on that tree in the middle it will kill it.
 
Feb 6, 2007
4,314
4,543
1,743
Ardmore, Ok.
#6
Either tordon or glyphosate ('Roundup') can give good control, but here are the discussion points:
- Probably not a "one and done" deal with either herbicide. Will likely take multiple applications for at least one full growing season, maybe more.
- Picloram (active ingredient in Tordon) has soil residual activity. This is good for morning glory control but potentially really bad for any desirables you have growing in close proximity. If you have sandy soils, the picloram will move in the soil profile, whereas heavy-textured clay soils will bind the chemical to the clay particles.
- Glyphosate (active ingredient in Roundup) has no soil residual activity; meaning that it only kills what it comes in contact with and, thus, poses no risk of damage to peripheral plants.

Pick your poison (pun intended), but glyphosate is a safer option. Just remember that you are not going to spray it once and then forget it, due to the vast root system that facilitates the storage of carbohydrates and regeneration.
 

ksupoke

We don't need no, thot kuntrol
A/V Subscriber
Feb 16, 2011
11,907
14,506
743
dark sarcasm in the classroom
#8
I would recommend using a brush to put it directly on the morning glory. If you get it on that tree in the middle it will kill it.
Either tordon or glyphosate ('Roundup') can give good control, but here are the discussion points:
- Probably not a "one and done" deal with either herbicide. Will likely take multiple applications for at least one full growing season, maybe more.
- Picloram (active ingredient in Tordon) has soil residual activity. This is good for morning glory control but potentially really bad for any desirables you have growing in close proximity. If you have sandy soils, the picloram will move in the soil profile, whereas heavy-textured clay soils will bind the chemical to the clay particles.
- Glyphosate (active ingredient in Roundup) has no soil residual activity; meaning that it only kills what it comes in contact with and, thus, poses no risk of damage to peripheral plants.

Pick your poison (pun intended), but glyphosate is a safer option. Just remember that you are not going to spray it once and then forget it, due to the vast root system that facilitates the storage of carbohydrates and regeneration.
I appreciate all the input. Make no mistake I understand this isn’t a one and done the digging up last year was, certainly a way to take my mind off things, but these demons have been my bane for 3 years now. I have tried a number of different concoctions and finally the only thing I saw working was tilling to find & then digging up the root balls then saturating the area with a 100% vinegar solution, that works but it not only is pretty good amount of work but it takes a long time to dig and pull those little bastards from whatever they’ve wrapped around.
This year once our rainy season (tongue planted firmly in cheek) ended, I started with the idea that I was tackling it the same way, then I decided to swallow my pride and ask for help.

Thanks again
 
Last edited:

OSU79

Federal Marshal
A/V Subscriber
Oct 22, 2009
12,011
11,013
1,743
Back home in God's (Green) Country
#9
I appreciate all the input. Make no mistake I understand this isn’t a one and done the digging up last year was, certainly a way to take my mind off things, but these demons have been my bane for 3 years now. I have tried a number of different concoctions and finally the only thing I saw working was tilling to find & then digging up the root balls then saturating the area with a 100% vinegar solution, that works but it not only is pretty good amount of work but it takes a long time to dig and pull those little bastards from whatever they’ve wrapped around.
This year once our rainy season (tongue planted firmly in cheek) ended, I started with the idea that I was tackling it the same way, then I decided to swallow my pride and ask for help.

Thanks again
quitter
 

#1 Pokes Fan

Territorial Marshal
Mar 27, 2012
5,719
5,826
743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
#11
I'll see your morning glories and raise you a purple wisteria.
I had two of those at our house when we bought it. They were literally pulling down a six foot chain link fence. I cut them out of it and down to ground level. I drilled several half inch holes into the stumps and filled them with diesel every day for about a week. That was three years ago and I still have an occasional one pop up along the vines that are underground.
 

Jostate

Bluecolla's sock
A/V Subscriber
Jun 24, 2005
20,676
14,670
1,743
#13
I had two of those at our house when we bought it. They were literally pulling down a six foot chain link fence. I cut them out of it and down to ground level. I drilled several half inch holes into the stumps and filled them with diesel every day for about a week. That was three years ago and I still have an occasional one pop up along the vines that are underground.
I call it the beast. Mine pulled the pergola over.

In my ongoing battle with the beast I saved 2 of the pillars from the old pergola, dug a hole half way to China, quickreted in a PVC pipe and put the old pillars over them. This gave me a stable pole to run the wisteria up for the new and improved pergola. That's what you see the wisteria wound around towards the yard.

Anyway, the beast does look good when under control. Also, this is how much it regrew in one year, since I cut it back to ground level.

1590285649707.png
 
Last edited: