what kind of snake?

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Oct 13, 2008
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#1
Was this a baby rattler? It was about 12 inches long. Actually found two today in the backyard way too close to the kids toys. Normally I'll just take snakes to the wood pile and let them go, but this guy was way to aggressive and I wasn't a fan of that color pattern. Thanks.

IMG_20160808_1603086_rewind_kindlephoto-250275524.jpg
 

jobob85

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#2
Was this a baby rattler? It was about 12 inches long. Actually found two today in the backyard way too close to the kids toys. Normally I'll just take snakes to the wood pile and let them go, but this guy was way to aggressive and I wasn't a fan of that color pattern. Thanks.

View attachment 49031
In four pieces, I would say a perfect one.
 

sc5mu93

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#3
Head shape and eyes look non-venomous. I would guess not a pit viper (rattlesnake). More than likely nonvenomous. I'm no expert, but looks like a rat snake.
 

sc5mu93

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#9
I know no one wants to get close to identify a snake, so a general rule is shorter and fatter snakes are the venomous ones. Long and skinny are non venomous.

If you have the luxury (ie, snake not chasing or striking at you) look at the head shape and eyes. Triangular head with slitted pupil is probably a venomous one. Slender ovalish head and circular eyes is non venomous.

I think most of, if not all of the venomous snakes you will encounter in OK and North Texas are pit viper which have this distinctive head appearance.

Some of the non venomous ones are very beneficial. Particularly the king snakes because they EAT the pit vipers.

 
Feb 6, 2007
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#10
Snake bites to people, pets and livestock
STILLWATER, Okla. – Snakebites do not typically occur because the reptile is attacking or being overly aggressive. Rather, most are the result of the timid creature being startled and going into self-defense mode.

Prairie rattlesnake

“There is no need to be fearful of snakes. They aren’t trying to bite you,” said Dwayne Elmore, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension wildlife specialist. “Give venomous snakes a wide birth and they will move away from you. Most bites occur when someone either puts their hand where they can't see (and inadvertently on or near a snake) or when someone is harassing or trying to kill a snake.”

The same can be said for pets and livestock that are bitten. The curious nature of dogs leads to some incidents and horses may accidentally step on or put their head down to look at a snake.

In the rare event someone is actually bitten by a venomous snake, there are several things they should not do, and one they definitely should.

“Don’t panic. Don’t use a tourniquet. Don’t cut the wound and don’t use electricity,” said Elmore. “Just stay calm, elevate the wounded area and get to a hospital immediately.”

The advice also is true for pets, as they should be taken to the veterinarian immediately. There are a few first-aid tactics you could try on your way, however.

“Try to carry your pet rather than allowing them to walk and keep them quiet and warm during transport to the veterinarian,” said Dr. Elisabeth Giedt, director of Continuing Education, Extension and Community Engagement at the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences at OSU.

Tourniquets should not be applied as it can cause additional harm. While bites from nonvenomous snakes can cause swelling and bruising, bites from venomous snakes can have much more serious symptoms.

“Generally there is extensive swelling that spreads rapidly. The bite wound may bleed or produce a bloody discharge,” she said. “The bite wounds from the fangs may not be visible due to the swelling or the small mouth size of young or small snakes. Shortly after being bitten, dogs may demonstrate weakness, cool feet, pale mucous membranes and hyperventilation. The gums may turn pale or blue. It’s not uncommon for snake venom to also cause vomiting shortly after the initial bite occurs.”

The quicker pet owners are able to get their animals to the vet the better. Bites on or near the head tend to be more severe than bites to the leg and paws. The same is true for livestock.

“I don’t think you want to panic about snakes with horses. You have to think about how big they are,” said Kris Hiney, OSU Cooperative Extension equine specialist. “Something that could kill a small dog isn’t going to really hurt a horse. For horses, their biggest risk factor is if they get bit on the face.”

A bite to or near the face can cause a lot of swelling and give the horse trouble with breathing. Bites on the face of your horse should be seen by your veterinarian as soon as possible.

Extreme swelling of the bite to the face of a horse could close off air flow through the nose. Horses can only breathe through their nose and this could potentially suffocate the horse.

http://www.dasnr.okstate.edu/Member....edu/snake-bites-to-people-pets-and-livestock
 
Feb 6, 2007
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#11
Learn to Recognize Venomous Snakes
By Michael Porter
Of the 46 species of snakes native to Oklahoma, only seven are venomous to humans. If you learn to identify the seven venomous species, then you will recognize other Oklahoma snakes as not dangerous, even though you may not be able to identify the species.

All seven venomous species belong to the same family, Viperidae or pit vipers. Pit vipers are the only snakes that have a pit on each side of the head between and below the nostril and eye. The pits serve as stereoscopic heat-sensing organs that allow pit vipers to find and strike warm-blooded prey in total darkness. Pit vipers are the only Oklahoma snakes with retractable fangs in the tops of their mouths. The fangs are used to inject venom for killing prey and as a means of defense. Pit vipers have elliptical pupils like cats while Oklahoma nonvenomous snakes, except the Texas night snake, have round pupils like humans. A pit viper has a single row of scales on the bottom of its tail behind the anus while Oklahoma nonvenomous snakes, except the Texas long-nosed snake, have two rows of scales on the bottoms of their tails behind the anus. A pit viper has one row of teeth on each side in the upper mouth while many nonvenomous snakes have two rows on each side in their upper mouths. Heads of pit vipers are significantly wider than their necks while heads of most nonvenomous snakes are usually only slightly wider than their necks or are the same width as their necks. Pit vipers tend to have stocky bodies while most nonvenomous snakes tend to have relatively slender bodies.

Although these differences definitively separate pit vipers from nonvenomous Oklahoma snakes, a person might have to be an unsafe distance from a live snake to see many of these characteristics. The best way to safely identify an Oklahoma venomous snake from a distance is to simply learn the color patterns and general characteristics of the seven venomous species. This is not as difficult as it might seem because the seven venomous species can be further lumped into three types, rattlesnakes (five species), copperhead (one species) and cottonmouth (one species). If you learn to identify a rattlesnake, a copperhead and a cottonmouth, then you can quickly tell whether an Oklahoma snake is venomous or not.

As their name implies, rattlesnakes typically have rattles, but they may have only a button (first segment of a rattle) or a squared-off tail if they lose all their rattle segments, which is rare. Copperheads have alternating bands of darker and lighter copper, reddish-brown or pinkish colors. The western cottonmouth is more difficult to distinguish from nonvenomous water snakes because its color can vary somewhat; it can have bands or it can have a relatively consistent color. The cottonmouth is usually near water, but can be encountered away from water. Usually, the cottonmouth's most dependable characteristic from a safe distance is a black streak or mark on the side of the head that runs from the eye to just past the corner of the mouth, which is visible from several feet away.

North Texas has the same venomous snakes as Oklahoma with one addition, the Texas coral snake, which also might be rarely found near the Red River in extreme southern Oklahoma. The coral snake is not a pit viper- it is a member of the cobra family, Elapidae. It is a relatively slender snake with black and red bands separated by yellow bands and a black nose. In similarly colored non-venomous snakes, the red and yellow bands are separated by black bands or they lack a black nose.

Learning to recognize and understand the venomous snakes might save you, a loved one or a pet from a lot of misery that could result from a close encounter of the bad kind. However, remember, snakes are native creatures, so even venomous species have a place in the big scheme of things.
http://www.noble.org/ag/wildlife/snakes/


broad-banded copperhead


Texas coral snake "Red and yellow kill a fellow."


Western cottonmouth (aka "Water moccasin")


Western diamondback rattlesnake

upload_2016-8-9_9-38-13.jpeg

Western massasaqua rattlesnake


Prairie rattlesnake


Western pygmy rattlesnake


Timber rattlesnake (aka "Coontail rattler")
 

Deere Poke

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#17
And you would be correct. Didn't pay any attention to the color pattern on my web image. :blink: Thanks for the correction.
Coral snake is not a pit viper, your page says all venomous snakes in the state are pit vipers.

BTW, I'll disagree with you about pygmy rattle snakes. I generally let snakes go about their business and leave them alone. But those little dudes just like to get into places where they constantly pose a danger to myself and my kids. Not to mention when they see you they will freaking crawl over to you just because they are curious.

Never dealt with snakes like them before in my life and I have a ton of them on my property. Not particularity aggressive but always putting themselves in places where accidents can happen. I've killed 6 of them in my barn. Nothing like walking out to the freezer barefoot and looking down and seeing a damn rattlesnake between your feet or working on fence and having them crawl over to get in the shade under your butt.

I like snakes that go the other way when they see you.

Here is a nice example of one being where it shouldn't be. It's a little messy but scrap metal behind my lathe in the barn. Noticed him when my hand was about touching that piece of square tube.
IMAG00118 1.jpg
 
Feb 6, 2007
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#18
Coral snake is not a pit viper, your page says all venomous snakes in the state are pit vipers.

BTW, I'll disagree with you about pygmy rattle snakes. I generally let snakes go about their business and leave them alone. But those little dudes just like to get into places where they constantly pose a danger to myself and my kids. Not to mention when they see you they will freaking crawl over to you just because they are curious.

Never dealt with snakes like them before in my life and I have a ton of them on my property. Not particularity aggressive but always putting themselves in places where accidents can happen. I've killed 6 of them in my barn. Nothing like walking out to the freezer barefoot and looking down and seeing a damn rattlesnake between your feet or working on fence and having them crawl over to get in the shade under your butt.

I like snakes that go the other way when they see you.

Here is a nice example of one being where it shouldn't be. It's a little messy but scrap metal behind my lathe in the barn. Noticed him when my hand was about touching that piece of square tube. View attachment 49340
You are correct, Coral snakes are not pit vipers.

I have had many (Many!) close encounters with rattlesnakes of all kinds. Fortunately, only one has ever struck at me (actually bit my boot). I have, however, been bitten by a small cottonmouth. Have to admit though, I was in his space.
 

Deere Poke

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#19
You are correct, Coral snakes are not pit vipers.

I have had many (Many!) close encounters with rattlesnakes of all kinds. Fortunately, only one has ever struck at me (actually bit my boot). I have, however, been bitten by a small cottonmouth. Have to admit though, I was in his space.
I've had a couple of pygmies bite the toe of my boot. Received one dry bite from a cottonmouth about half way up my calf. Very fortunate it was a dry bite, I was hours away from any type of medical help, miles away from a vehicle. It still hurt like heck for a few days.
 
Feb 6, 2007
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#20
I've had a couple of pygmies bite the toe of my boot. Received one dry bite from a cottonmouth about half way up my calf. Very fortunate it was a dry bite, I was hours away from any type of medical help, miles away from a vehicle. It still hurt like heck for a few days.
Similar to my cottonmouth experience. Was wade-fishing and got bit right below my knee, on the outside of my calf. Very light venomization resulted in swollen and aching lymph nodes in the groin area and two small necrotic lesions that are still visible "pits". I have forgotten my waders that day, so I was wading in my underwear. :eek: