Wuhan Coronavirus

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Rack

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Oct 13, 2004
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Muscogee Georgia Pacific tp plant ramped up production and is hiring more people...So the TP industry isn't going to *hit like the rest of the economy...wait...
 
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Pokey

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Sep 13, 2013
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Costco actually had everything but Purell yesterday. TP was not in vast quantities but they had it. I have been very impressed with their supply chain.
With pick up only we can’t get lunch meat, cooking oil, bag of potatoes, frozen French fries, pasta, rubbing alcohol, Purcell,pre cooked ham,.............three weeks in a row.
 
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Mar 11, 2006
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Yes but the younger people are also infecting more people than any other age group, last update I saw was they were infecting over 2 people each. Thus they should be more concerned about transmitting than actually suffering from it.
So how do you know they are not concerned? Did you ask them? Were they coming close to you in the store ... and if so, why didn’t you walk around them or go the other way. Just about every time I have been out to a Home Depot, Walmart, or the grocery stores nearly everyone is practicing social distancing.

I hope no one on this board supports the a-hole who tweeted a picture to Mayor Holt of four people playing volleyball outside.

Some of you need to think about situations of others, Mothers may not have someone else they trust to watch their kid. They might not have an option to leave the children with someone. Or they may not feel safe, health wise, to have others come over. Some of you people shock me with your self-righteousness. I realize you are nervous, but think about others.
 

jetman

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Nov 27, 2004
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One of the families was probably my son, his wife and three kids. They're so damn dumb. :cursing: They absolutely won't listen about going out and taking the kids, especially right now. They are always like that though. One never goes anywhere without the other one. They are young and have serious trust issues. If one kid is sick, they load up the whole family and go to Wal Mart for medicine instead of just one going. It is so bad, I asked them if one of them knew the way to Wal Mart and the other one knew the way home.
The trust issues are so bad that they think that one of them is going to stop off and cheat on the way to the store? What a terrible way to live life.
 

RxCowboy

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4) Quick reminder that some people are experiencing digestive issues from the virus. We discussed this one early on but it seemed like a good time for a reminder. Some people get vomiting and diarrhea. It isn't the most common symptoms although some countries/populations seem to see more of it than others.

5) You may recall we discussed viral load previously. (how you are shedding the disease pretty heavily at first) Remember, in those first 5 days prior to even knowing you are sick - you are giving it off pretty heavy. Then the viral load lowers. Well research released yesterday suggested that it actually lowers by about 50% but then can be found in the bowels. This would explain the digestive issues. Here is why we care - If this proves to be correct (further research is needed and is currently happening) it means it may be possible to spread it more ways than we thought. Most viruses are systemic - meaning they settle into a body system and do their thing there. This is a known respiratory illness and settles into the lungs causing trouble. Thus it is also spread through exhaled air, coughs, sneezes, etc. But - if it is also detectable at high enough levels it could also pass through the bowel, then it could spread that way too (think poop droplets on your toothbrush). And Chinese researchers say they were finding it in the blood as well. All of this could give the virus even more ways to spread. Think of all this as things we are watching and studying but don't know yet. It doesn't change any of what we are doing and if that is how the virus works, that isn't new; it's what the virus has been doing all along, it's just something we didn't know, and again, it doesn't change our response. I wanted to share it because it has the potential to find its way to the misinformation rumor mill. So when you hear it - don't let it rattle you.
Guess we need toilet paper and wet wipes after all...
 
Sep 29, 2011
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Not true. Ships can re flag if they want to and it is a common practice


CLIA [Cruise Lines International Association] maintains there are reasons for such policies: “There are many factors that determine where a cruise ship — or for that matter, any maritime vessel — is flagged. Those determinations are made by individual cruise lines and other ship operators based on varying factors including the capabilities of the flag to deliver the services needed; representation and reputation of the flag in the international shipping community; the performance of the flag state, which dictates how a ship is prioritized by port states; the pool of seafarers able to meet the needs of the flag; and the flag’s fees/charges and taxes,”

Or this academic paper

On the other hand, an academic paper by Caitlin E. Burke of the University of Florida about “Legal Issues Relevant to Cruise Ships” made no bones of observing that reflagging of ships had long been used as a means of avoiding U.S. federal taxes, labor and safety laws, environmental laws, lawsuits, criminal investigations, and other regulations:
Aside from the majority revenue generated by U.S. passengers, cruise lines are independent of the U.S. economy. Even though nearly 75 percent of passengers are U.S. citizens, “cruise line corporations and their ships are not traditionally American-owned or registered …” (Tomlinson, 2007)​
Cruise line companies are not concerned about increasing minimum wage, rising insurance premiums, or higher corporate taxes. Cruise lines escape federal taxes and labor laws by registering their corporations and vessels in foreign countries [such as] Panama, Liberia, and the Bahamas. In fact, employees of cruise lines are often mistreated due to lackadaisical labor laws. Worst of all, employees will find little to no recourse pursuing litigation. Likewise, a U.S. citizen passenger faces the same predicament.​
A vessel’s country of registration is commonly referred to as the “flag of convenience” (FOC). Flagging a ship under a foreign flag for the convenience of the cruise line is nothing new, nor is it rare. The majority of cruise ships today are registered to Panama, Liberia, or the Bahamas. It is important to pay close attention as many vessels within the same fleet are often registered to different countries. Carnival Corporation, for example, has flagged their cruise vessel Celebration under Panama and Destiny under the Bahamas. Cruise lines often avoid drawing attention to the FOC of by using the term “headquartered in Miami, Florida.” It is important to understand that while the majority of these cruise lines have their headquarters in Miami, they are not registered in the U.S. Thus, U.S. laws do not apply and passengers are at the mercy of maritime law.​
Are you familiar with the Jones Act of 1920?

US flagged ships have to be built in the US. That’s law.
Only US flagged ships can engage in commercial business between US posts. That’s law.
Shipbuilding in the US is multiples more expensive than places like S Korea, Vietnam Indonesia, Philippines, etc.. That’s fact.
There is only one cruise ship that is flagged in the US - NCL America’s Pride of America (1999). That aside, the last cruise ship built in the US was more than 50 years ago.


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The PVSA of 1886 applies to passengers. The Jones Act applies to freight.
https://www.marketplace.org/2017/09/29/working-cruise-ship-america-jobs-hiring/
“One such policy was the Passenger Vessel Services Act (PVSA), which was signed into law by President Grover Cleveland in 1886.
Under the PVSA, only ships built in the U.S., owned by U.S. companies and staffed with American crew are allowed to ferry passengers from one U.S. Port to another, according to US. Customs and Border Protection. As a result — even today, more than a century later — the law still affects who certain commercial ships, like cruise ships, can hire.
The PVSA is similar to another century-old maritime regulations that made the headlines this week: the Jones Act. The act prohibits foreign built and owned ships from transporting goods domestically similarly to the way that PVSA prohibits the transportation of people. On Thursday, the White House announced that it was temporarily lifting the act’s restrictions for ten days to allow foreign ship to ferry goods from various U.S. ports to Puerto Rico in order to speed up its recovery efforts following Hurricane Maria.

While the Jones Act has protected the domestic shipping and shipbuilding industries from international competition, the PSVA does not seem to have done the same for the cruise industry. An op-ed published earlier this year in the Los Angeles Times argued that instead of protecting U.S. jobs, the PVSA actually ruined American cruises and cost American jobs.”
I think some are missing the point. Whether it’s a cruise ship or merchant vessel, to be flagged as a US ship it must be built in the US - which is cost prohibitive in almost all cases.


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State

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Mar 15, 2007
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So how do you know they are not concerned? Did you ask them? Were they coming close to you in the store ... and if so, why didn’t you walk around them or go the other way. Just about every time I have been out to a Home Depot, Walmart, or the grocery stores nearly everyone is practicing social distancing.

I hope no one on this board supports the a-hole who tweeted a picture to Mayor Holt of four people playing volleyball outside.

Some of you need to think about situations of others, Mothers may not have someone else they trust to watch their kid. They might not have an option to leave the children with someone. Or they may not feel safe, health wise, to have others come over. Some of you people shock me with your self-righteousness. I realize you are nervous, but think about others.
I saw a guy who looked young and healthy at the store wearing a mask and gloves. Found out he has a compromised immune system but still needed to shop. When you replace judgement with curiosity, everything changes.
 

osupsycho

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So how do you know they are not concerned? Did you ask them? Were they coming close to you in the store ... and if so, why didn’t you walk around them or go the other way. Just about every time I have been out to a Home Depot, Walmart, or the grocery stores nearly everyone is practicing social distancing.

I hope no one on this board supports the a-hole who tweeted a picture to Mayor Holt of four people playing volleyball outside.

Some of you need to think about situations of others, Mothers may not have someone else they trust to watch their kid. They might not have an option to leave the children with someone. Or they may not feel safe, health wise, to have others come over. Some of you people shock me with your self-righteousness. I realize you are nervous, but think about others.
So you apparently did not read my comment. I was talking about two parent whole families out and wondered why one parent could not stay at home or even in the car with the kids. Yes I understand single parents but that was not my comment at all, you just decided to twist it to fit your narrative.
 

CPTNQUIRK

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Just saw on my Google feed that a grocery store in Penn. had to throw out $35k worth of fresh produce because some dumb b**** thought it would be a funny prank to go and cough on all of it... I'm getting so sick of people thinking it's funny to cough on food, lick ice cream containers, etc. Like how stupid and self absorbed do you have to be?!
That dumbass should be infected so that he knows what it’s like.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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Are you going to cruise once a year in the future?


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I was actually scheduled to go on a Royal Caribbean cruise out of the New Orleans port on March 14th. Once they canceled that cruise we were offered a full refund or a 125% credit to a future cruise. We chose the credit. My family will continue to cruise in the future.
 
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RxCowboy

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From Harrison's Textbook of Internal Medicine:

ISOLATION PROCEDURES, PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT, AND HAND WASHING
Most respiratory viruses are spread by direct contact—i.e., body-surface to body-surface contact and physical transfer of microorganisms between a susceptible person and an infected person. Poor hand hygiene is probably the most common cause of contact transmission of viruses, which occurs often in family, school, and workplace settings. Transmission between health care workers and patients also takes place when hand-washing compliance is low. Fomites (objects or substances capable of carrying infectious organisms), including instruments, stethoscopes, and other objects in medical environments, can contribute to transmission. Airborne transmission can occur but is probably not the dominant mode of transmission for most respiratory viruses. Particle size affects the epidemiology of airborne pathogens. The composition and size distribution of the generated particles affect the duration of suspension of the infectious agents in the air, the distance across which they can be transported, the interval during which the virus remains infectious, and the site of deposition in the airway of a susceptible host. Direct exposure to large-particle aerosols (e.g., exposure at close range—up to 3 ft—to a cough or sneeze) causes some transmission. Particles of small size can remain suspended in the air for long periods; for instance, particles of ~1 µm can remain suspended for hours. However, in general, only a few respiratory viruses are thought to be transmitted by small-particle aerosols. Protection from transmission in health care environments can be achieved by proper implementation of and adherence to established procedures for the appropriate level of precaution.

Standard and Contact Precautions
Standard precautions, the basic level of infection control that is used in the care of all patients at all times, reduces the risk of transmission of viruses from respiratory tract secretions and mucous membranes. Contact precautions, the second level, require a single room for the patient when possible and the use of additional personal protective equipment, including the wearing of clean, nonsterile gloves when touching a patient or coming into contact with secretions. Fluid-resistant nonsterile gowns are used to protect skin and clothing during activities where contact with secretions is anticipated, and providers should wear each gown for the care of only one patient. A face mask is used when there is potential for direct contact with respiratory secretions. Eye protection (goggles or face shields) is worn in anticipation of potential splashing of respiratory secretions. Good hand hygiene should always follow any patient contact, including washing for 20 seconds with soap and warm water or cleaning with an alcohol-based hand rub. Providers should attempt to avoid the contamination of clothing and the transfer of microorganisms to other patients, surfaces, or environments.

Droplet Precautions
Large-particle droplets are generated during sneezing and coughing and during the performance of some medical procedures, such as airway suctioning in critical care units or bronchoscopy. Such droplets may contain viruses, but their range is usually limited to about 3 ft. Transmission of large-particle droplets occurs when they are deposited on the nasal mucosa or conjunctivae. To prevent transmission in these settings, providers should implement droplet precautions. They should wear a face mask, such as a surgical mask, for close contact (within 3 ft of the patient). Patients also should wear a face mask when exiting the examination room and should avoid coming into close contact with other patients.

Airborne Precautions
Airborne transmission occurs through the dissemination of airborne droplet nuclei (particles of =5 µm) or evaporated droplets containing viruses that can remain suspended in the air for long periods. Certain viruses that are carried by the airborne route can be inhaled by a susceptible host in the same room or over a long distance from the source patient, depending on environmental factors such as temperature and ventilation. Viruses transmitted by this route are SARS-CoV, measles virus, and VZV. Patients with these infections should be managed with personal respiratory protection and special ventilation and air handling. Providers should wear an N95 respirator selected with fit-testing, which must be repeated annually. Powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs) are used in some cases. The patient should be housed in an airborne-infection isolation room—a negative-pressure room that has a minimum of six air exchanges per hour and exhausts through high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration or directly to the outside.