Wuhan Coronavirus

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sc5mu93

WeaselMonkey
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Oct 18, 2006
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Per the NYC Chair of the Council of Health

NYC morgues are overrun with bodies. City has approved contingency plan to start temporarily begin burying burying coffins in selected NYC public Parks.

The avg hospital morgue in NYC holds 15 bodies. Several hospitals now have 2-3 refrigerated trucks parked on site to hold bodies. Each truck holds 100 bodies and 80 of them are currently in use by NYC hospitals.

Cemeteries and Funeral Homes can not keep up with demand at this time in NYC

Prior to the pandemic the avg number of deaths in a home was 20-25 per day. Currently 200-215 people are dying in their homes each day. At the first they swabbed these home deaths for COVID-19 but now due to shortage of tests they are not swabbing home deaths and they are not known if COVID-19 was involved and not counted toward official numbers


Mark D. Levine
@MarkLevineNYC


Soon we'll start “temporary interment”. This likely will be done by using a NYC park for burials (yes you read that right). Trenches will be dug for 10 caskets in a line. It will be done in a dignified, orderly--and temporary--manner. But it will be tough for NYers to take
DAMN.
 

OrangeFan69

LA Face with an Okla. booty.
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Apr 24, 2010
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Can't believe Dubya has gone libtard and is attacking PRESIDENT Trump;

Probably just mad because PRESIDENT Trump beat low energy Jeb Bush in 2016.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...oF3iMO1-I6ROTxbly1Yhb1LwhGvAIM0zJjQ1RmzceM-e0

In the summer of 2005, President George W. Bush was on vacation at his ranch in Crawford, Texas, when he began flipping through a copy of a new book about the 1918 flu pandemic. He couldn't put it down.
When he returned to Washington, he called his top homeland security adviser into the Oval Office and gave her the galley of historian John M. Barry's "The Great Influenza," which told the chilling tale of the mysterious plague that "would kill more people than the outbreak of any other disease in human history."

"You've got to read this," Fran Townsend remembers the president telling her. "He said, 'Look, this happens every 100 years. We need a national strategy.'"
MORE: Coronavirus map: Tracking the spread in the US and around the world

Thus was born the nation's most comprehensive pandemic plan -- a playbook that included diagrams for a global early warning system, funding to develop new, rapid vaccine technology, and a robust national stockpile of critical supplies, such as face masks and ventilators, Townsend said.

The effort was intense over the ensuing three years, including exercises where cabinet officials gamed out their responses, but it was not sustained. Large swaths of the ambitious plan were either not fully realized or entirely shelved as other priorities and crises took hold.
© Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images, FILE President George W. Bush walks towards microphones to speak to the press, Dec. 22, 2005 at the White House.

But elements of that effort have formed the foundation for the national response to the coronavirus pandemic underway right now.

"Despite politics, despite changes, when a crisis hits, you pull what you've got off the shelf and work from there," Townsend said.

When Bush first told his aides he wanted to focus on the potential of a global pandemic, many of them harbored doubts.
MORE: Experts warn about big dollar fraud in $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief package
"My reaction was -- I'm buried. I'm dealing with counterterrorism. Hurricane season. Wildfires. I'm like, 'What?'" Townsend said. "He said to me, 'It may not happen on our watch, but the nation needs the plan.'"
Over the ensuing months, cabinet officials got behind the idea. Most of them had governed through the Sept. 11 terror attacks, so events considered unlikely but highly-impactful had a certain resonance.


News to stay informed. Advice to stay safe.
Click here for complete coronavirus coverage from Microsoft News


"There was a realization that it's no longer fantastical to raise scenarios about planes falling from the sky, or anthrax arriving in the mail," said Tom Bossert, who worked in the Bush White House and went on to serve as Homeland Security secretary in the Trump administration. "It was not a novel. It was the world we were living."
According to Bossert, who is now an ABC News consultant, Bush did not just insist on preparation for a pandemic. He was obsessed with it.
"He was completely taken by the reality that that was going to happen," Bossert said.
© Brendan Smialowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE Anthony S. Fauci, director of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease for National Institutes for Health, listens to questions during a hearing of the House International Relations Committee on Capitol Hill, Dec. 7, 2005 in Washington.

Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis.

In a November 2005 speech at the National Institutes of Health, Bush laid out proposals in granular detail -- describing with stunning prescience how a pandemic in the United States would unfold. Among those in the audience was Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leader of the current crisis response, who was then and still is now the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

"A pandemic is a lot like a forest fire," Bush said at the time. "If caught early it might be extinguished with limited damage. If allowed to smolder, undetected, it can grow to an inferno that can spread quickly beyond our ability to control it."

The president recognized that an outbreak was a different kind of disaster than the ones the federal government had been designed to address.
MORE: Stimulus check calculator: How much might you receive?

"To respond to a pandemic, we need medical personnel and adequate supplies of equipment," Bush said. "In a pandemic, everything from syringes to hospital beds, respirators masks and protective equipment would be in short supply."

Bush told the gathered scientists that they would need to develop a vaccine in record time.
"If a pandemic strikes, our country must have a surge capacity in place that will allow us to bring a new vaccine on line quickly and manufacture enough to immunize every American against the pandemic strain," he said.
© Dennis Brack/Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE Fran Townsend, President Bush's adviser on Homeland Security, answers questions at a White House press briefing on the reorganization of the Homeland Security system, June 29, 2005, in Washington D.C.

Bush set out to spend $7 billion building out his plan. His cabinet secretaries urged their staffs to take preparations seriously. The government launched a website, www.pandemicflu.gov, that is still in use today. But as time passed, it became increasingly difficult to justify the continued funding, staffing and attention, Bossert said.

"You need to have annual budget commitment. You need to have institutions that can survive any one administration. And you need to have leadership experience," Bossert said. "All three of those can be effected by our wonderful and unique form of government in which you transfer power every four years."
Bush declined, through a spokesman, to comment on the unfolding crisis or discuss the current response. But his remarks from 15 years ago still resonate.

"If we wait for a pandemic to appear," he warned, "it will be too late to prepare. And one day many lives could be needlessly lost because we failed to act today."
 

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
21,254
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It wasn't clear to me because that wasn't what your post said.

Don't tell me I don't understand the conflict between personal freedom or how this is likely to change our economy. My daughter is currently out of a job and I have no idea if my institution is going to survive this. I've rarely been out of the house in the past week and guess what, I have symptoms of a cold now, so I can't freaking leave the house no matter what and I'm checking my temp several times a day. I understand pretty doggone well how draconian this has been because I was given basically four days to prepare to teach everything online. I spent a weekend learning how to do so. The difference between us is that I think the measures are necessary, whereas you're unwilling to admit that. You keep hoping that somehow it's all proven wrong. And the death toll keeps climbing. As I've said, oh like 50 bazillion times, it isn't the death toll from COVID-19 that is the problem, it is the resources that treating it takes up and all the other diseases that still need to be treated. If Grandma has a stroke and needs an ICU bed and they are full of COVID-19 patients then Grandma is SOL.
I said it's a tough balance and that we are mainly leaning to on one side more than the other... In a free society we are ok to point that out...Good luck with the cold.... I hope that is all that it is and you are fine. NO ONE wants anyone's death on their hands. That's why I'm wearing gloves and mask at work and social distancing. This as a lot of my friends are being laid off as of today (600 or so of them) in the hospital that is my main client...this due to them not being able to preform routine procedures in order to prepare for a surge...a surge that we all hope and pray never comes. Stay Healthy and God Bless.
 

sc5mu93

WeaselMonkey
A/V Subscriber
Oct 18, 2006
9,972
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Spring, TX
Can't believe Dubya has gone libtard and is attacking PRESIDENT Trump;

Probably just mad because PRESIDENT Trump beat low energy Jeb Bush in 2016.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...oF3iMO1-I6ROTxbly1Yhb1LwhGvAIM0zJjQ1RmzceM-e0

In the summer of 2005, President George W. Bush was on vacation at his ranch in Crawford, Texas, when he began flipping through a copy of a new book about the 1918 flu pandemic. He couldn't put it down.
When he returned to Washington, he called his top homeland security adviser into the Oval Office and gave her the galley of historian John M. Barry's "The Great Influenza," which told the chilling tale of the mysterious plague that "would kill more people than the outbreak of any other disease in human history."

"You've got to read this," Fran Townsend remembers the president telling her. "He said, 'Look, this happens every 100 years. We need a national strategy.'"
MORE: Coronavirus map: Tracking the spread in the US and around the world

Thus was born the nation's most comprehensive pandemic plan -- a playbook that included diagrams for a global early warning system, funding to develop new, rapid vaccine technology, and a robust national stockpile of critical supplies, such as face masks and ventilators, Townsend said.

The effort was intense over the ensuing three years, including exercises where cabinet officials gamed out their responses, but it was not sustained. Large swaths of the ambitious plan were either not fully realized or entirely shelved as other priorities and crises took hold.
© Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images, FILE President George W. Bush walks towards microphones to speak to the press, Dec. 22, 2005 at the White House.

But elements of that effort have formed the foundation for the national response to the coronavirus pandemic underway right now.

"Despite politics, despite changes, when a crisis hits, you pull what you've got off the shelf and work from there," Townsend said.

When Bush first told his aides he wanted to focus on the potential of a global pandemic, many of them harbored doubts.
MORE: Experts warn about big dollar fraud in $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief package
"My reaction was -- I'm buried. I'm dealing with counterterrorism. Hurricane season. Wildfires. I'm like, 'What?'" Townsend said. "He said to me, 'It may not happen on our watch, but the nation needs the plan.'"
Over the ensuing months, cabinet officials got behind the idea. Most of them had governed through the Sept. 11 terror attacks, so events considered unlikely but highly-impactful had a certain resonance.


News to stay informed. Advice to stay safe.
Click here for complete coronavirus coverage from Microsoft News


"There was a realization that it's no longer fantastical to raise scenarios about planes falling from the sky, or anthrax arriving in the mail," said Tom Bossert, who worked in the Bush White House and went on to serve as Homeland Security secretary in the Trump administration. "It was not a novel. It was the world we were living."
According to Bossert, who is now an ABC News consultant, Bush did not just insist on preparation for a pandemic. He was obsessed with it.
"He was completely taken by the reality that that was going to happen," Bossert said.
© Brendan Smialowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE Anthony S. Fauci, director of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease for National Institutes for Health, listens to questions during a hearing of the House International Relations Committee on Capitol Hill, Dec. 7, 2005 in Washington.

Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis.

In a November 2005 speech at the National Institutes of Health, Bush laid out proposals in granular detail -- describing with stunning prescience how a pandemic in the United States would unfold. Among those in the audience was Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leader of the current crisis response, who was then and still is now the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

"A pandemic is a lot like a forest fire," Bush said at the time. "If caught early it might be extinguished with limited damage. If allowed to smolder, undetected, it can grow to an inferno that can spread quickly beyond our ability to control it."

The president recognized that an outbreak was a different kind of disaster than the ones the federal government had been designed to address.
MORE: Stimulus check calculator: How much might you receive?

"To respond to a pandemic, we need medical personnel and adequate supplies of equipment," Bush said. "In a pandemic, everything from syringes to hospital beds, respirators masks and protective equipment would be in short supply."

Bush told the gathered scientists that they would need to develop a vaccine in record time.
"If a pandemic strikes, our country must have a surge capacity in place that will allow us to bring a new vaccine on line quickly and manufacture enough to immunize every American against the pandemic strain," he said.
© Dennis Brack/Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE Fran Townsend, President Bush's adviser on Homeland Security, answers questions at a White House press briefing on the reorganization of the Homeland Security system, June 29, 2005, in Washington D.C.

Bush set out to spend $7 billion building out his plan. His cabinet secretaries urged their staffs to take preparations seriously. The government launched a website, www.pandemicflu.gov, that is still in use today. But as time passed, it became increasingly difficult to justify the continued funding, staffing and attention, Bossert said.

"You need to have annual budget commitment. You need to have institutions that can survive any one administration. And you need to have leadership experience," Bossert said. "All three of those can be effected by our wonderful and unique form of government in which you transfer power every four years."
Bush declined, through a spokesman, to comment on the unfolding crisis or discuss the current response. But his remarks from 15 years ago still resonate.

"If we wait for a pandemic to appear," he warned, "it will be too late to prepare. And one day many lives could be needlessly lost because we failed to act today."
Da phaq?
Bush declined, through a spokesman, to comment on the unfolding crisis or discuss the current response. But his remarks from 15 years ago still resonate.
so Bush is attacking 2020 Trump from 2005? W was a lot of things, but i would have never guessed the dude is a freaking time traveler!
 

NotOnTV

BRB -- Taking an okie leak
Sep 14, 2010
9,357
6,772
743
Gondor
Can't believe Dubya has gone libtard and is attacking PRESIDENT Trump;

Probably just mad because PRESIDENT Trump beat low energy Jeb Bush in 2016.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...oF3iMO1-I6ROTxbly1Yhb1LwhGvAIM0zJjQ1RmzceM-e0

In the summer of 2005, President George W. Bush was on vacation at his ranch in Crawford, Texas, when he began flipping through a copy of a new book about the 1918 flu pandemic. He couldn't put it down.
When he returned to Washington, he called his top homeland security adviser into the Oval Office and gave her the galley of historian John M. Barry's "The Great Influenza," which told the chilling tale of the mysterious plague that "would kill more people than the outbreak of any other disease in human history."

"You've got to read this," Fran Townsend remembers the president telling her. "He said, 'Look, this happens every 100 years. We need a national strategy.'"
MORE: Coronavirus map: Tracking the spread in the US and around the world

Thus was born the nation's most comprehensive pandemic plan -- a playbook that included diagrams for a global early warning system, funding to develop new, rapid vaccine technology, and a robust national stockpile of critical supplies, such as face masks and ventilators, Townsend said.

The effort was intense over the ensuing three years, including exercises where cabinet officials gamed out their responses, but it was not sustained. Large swaths of the ambitious plan were either not fully realized or entirely shelved as other priorities and crises took hold.
© Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images, FILE President George W. Bush walks towards microphones to speak to the press, Dec. 22, 2005 at the White House.

But elements of that effort have formed the foundation for the national response to the coronavirus pandemic underway right now.

"Despite politics, despite changes, when a crisis hits, you pull what you've got off the shelf and work from there," Townsend said.

When Bush first told his aides he wanted to focus on the potential of a global pandemic, many of them harbored doubts.
MORE: Experts warn about big dollar fraud in $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief package
"My reaction was -- I'm buried. I'm dealing with counterterrorism. Hurricane season. Wildfires. I'm like, 'What?'" Townsend said. "He said to me, 'It may not happen on our watch, but the nation needs the plan.'"
Over the ensuing months, cabinet officials got behind the idea. Most of them had governed through the Sept. 11 terror attacks, so events considered unlikely but highly-impactful had a certain resonance.


News to stay informed. Advice to stay safe.
Click here for complete coronavirus coverage from Microsoft News


"There was a realization that it's no longer fantastical to raise scenarios about planes falling from the sky, or anthrax arriving in the mail," said Tom Bossert, who worked in the Bush White House and went on to serve as Homeland Security secretary in the Trump administration. "It was not a novel. It was the world we were living."
According to Bossert, who is now an ABC News consultant, Bush did not just insist on preparation for a pandemic. He was obsessed with it.
"He was completely taken by the reality that that was going to happen," Bossert said.
© Brendan Smialowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE Anthony S. Fauci, director of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease for National Institutes for Health, listens to questions during a hearing of the House International Relations Committee on Capitol Hill, Dec. 7, 2005 in Washington.

Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis.

In a November 2005 speech at the National Institutes of Health, Bush laid out proposals in granular detail -- describing with stunning prescience how a pandemic in the United States would unfold. Among those in the audience was Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leader of the current crisis response, who was then and still is now the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

"A pandemic is a lot like a forest fire," Bush said at the time. "If caught early it might be extinguished with limited damage. If allowed to smolder, undetected, it can grow to an inferno that can spread quickly beyond our ability to control it."

The president recognized that an outbreak was a different kind of disaster than the ones the federal government had been designed to address.
MORE: Stimulus check calculator: How much might you receive?

"To respond to a pandemic, we need medical personnel and adequate supplies of equipment," Bush said. "In a pandemic, everything from syringes to hospital beds, respirators masks and protective equipment would be in short supply."

Bush told the gathered scientists that they would need to develop a vaccine in record time.
"If a pandemic strikes, our country must have a surge capacity in place that will allow us to bring a new vaccine on line quickly and manufacture enough to immunize every American against the pandemic strain," he said.
© Dennis Brack/Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE Fran Townsend, President Bush's adviser on Homeland Security, answers questions at a White House press briefing on the reorganization of the Homeland Security system, June 29, 2005, in Washington D.C.

Bush set out to spend $7 billion building out his plan. His cabinet secretaries urged their staffs to take preparations seriously. The government launched a website, www.pandemicflu.gov, that is still in use today. But as time passed, it became increasingly difficult to justify the continued funding, staffing and attention, Bossert said.

"You need to have annual budget commitment. You need to have institutions that can survive any one administration. And you need to have leadership experience," Bossert said. "All three of those can be effected by our wonderful and unique form of government in which you transfer power every four years."
Bush declined, through a spokesman, to comment on the unfolding crisis or discuss the current response. But his remarks from 15 years ago still resonate.

"If we wait for a pandemic to appear," he warned, "it will be too late to prepare. And one day many lives could be needlessly lost because we failed to act today."
All of the sudden, "Dubya Lied, People Died" is a hero of the left.
 
May 4, 2011
1,725
922
743
Charleston, SC
Can't believe Dubya has gone libtard and is attacking PRESIDENT Trump;

Probably just mad because PRESIDENT Trump beat low energy Jeb Bush in 2016.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...oF3iMO1-I6ROTxbly1Yhb1LwhGvAIM0zJjQ1RmzceM-e0

In the summer of 2005, President George W. Bush was on vacation at his ranch in Crawford, Texas, when he began flipping through a copy of a new book about the 1918 flu pandemic. He couldn't put it down.
When he returned to Washington, he called his top homeland security adviser into the Oval Office and gave her the galley of historian John M. Barry's "The Great Influenza," which told the chilling tale of the mysterious plague that "would kill more people than the outbreak of any other disease in human history."

"You've got to read this," Fran Townsend remembers the president telling her. "He said, 'Look, this happens every 100 years. We need a national strategy.'"
MORE: Coronavirus map: Tracking the spread in the US and around the world

Thus was born the nation's most comprehensive pandemic plan -- a playbook that included diagrams for a global early warning system, funding to develop new, rapid vaccine technology, and a robust national stockpile of critical supplies, such as face masks and ventilators, Townsend said.

The effort was intense over the ensuing three years, including exercises where cabinet officials gamed out their responses, but it was not sustained. Large swaths of the ambitious plan were either not fully realized or entirely shelved as other priorities and crises took hold.
© Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images, FILE President George W. Bush walks towards microphones to speak to the press, Dec. 22, 2005 at the White House.

But elements of that effort have formed the foundation for the national response to the coronavirus pandemic underway right now.

"Despite politics, despite changes, when a crisis hits, you pull what you've got off the shelf and work from there," Townsend said.

When Bush first told his aides he wanted to focus on the potential of a global pandemic, many of them harbored doubts.
MORE: Experts warn about big dollar fraud in $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief package
"My reaction was -- I'm buried. I'm dealing with counterterrorism. Hurricane season. Wildfires. I'm like, 'What?'" Townsend said. "He said to me, 'It may not happen on our watch, but the nation needs the plan.'"
Over the ensuing months, cabinet officials got behind the idea. Most of them had governed through the Sept. 11 terror attacks, so events considered unlikely but highly-impactful had a certain resonance.


News to stay informed. Advice to stay safe.
Click here for complete coronavirus coverage from Microsoft News


"There was a realization that it's no longer fantastical to raise scenarios about planes falling from the sky, or anthrax arriving in the mail," said Tom Bossert, who worked in the Bush White House and went on to serve as Homeland Security secretary in the Trump administration. "It was not a novel. It was the world we were living."
According to Bossert, who is now an ABC News consultant, Bush did not just insist on preparation for a pandemic. He was obsessed with it.
"He was completely taken by the reality that that was going to happen," Bossert said.
© Brendan Smialowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE Anthony S. Fauci, director of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease for National Institutes for Health, listens to questions during a hearing of the House International Relations Committee on Capitol Hill, Dec. 7, 2005 in Washington.

Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis.

In a November 2005 speech at the National Institutes of Health, Bush laid out proposals in granular detail -- describing with stunning prescience how a pandemic in the United States would unfold. Among those in the audience was Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leader of the current crisis response, who was then and still is now the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

"A pandemic is a lot like a forest fire," Bush said at the time. "If caught early it might be extinguished with limited damage. If allowed to smolder, undetected, it can grow to an inferno that can spread quickly beyond our ability to control it."

The president recognized that an outbreak was a different kind of disaster than the ones the federal government had been designed to address.
MORE: Stimulus check calculator: How much might you receive?

"To respond to a pandemic, we need medical personnel and adequate supplies of equipment," Bush said. "In a pandemic, everything from syringes to hospital beds, respirators masks and protective equipment would be in short supply."

Bush told the gathered scientists that they would need to develop a vaccine in record time.
"If a pandemic strikes, our country must have a surge capacity in place that will allow us to bring a new vaccine on line quickly and manufacture enough to immunize every American against the pandemic strain," he said.
© Dennis Brack/Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE Fran Townsend, President Bush's adviser on Homeland Security, answers questions at a White House press briefing on the reorganization of the Homeland Security system, June 29, 2005, in Washington D.C.

Bush set out to spend $7 billion building out his plan. His cabinet secretaries urged their staffs to take preparations seriously. The government launched a website, www.pandemicflu.gov, that is still in use today. But as time passed, it became increasingly difficult to justify the continued funding, staffing and attention, Bossert said.

"You need to have annual budget commitment. You need to have institutions that can survive any one administration. And you need to have leadership experience," Bossert said. "All three of those can be effected by our wonderful and unique form of government in which you transfer power every four years."
Bush declined, through a spokesman, to comment on the unfolding crisis or discuss the current response. But his remarks from 15 years ago still resonate.

"If we wait for a pandemic to appear," he warned, "it will be too late to prepare. And one day many lives could be needlessly lost because we failed to act today."
I'm by no means a Bush fan, but you do realize he refused to comment on this story, right? His quotes are all from about 15 years ago.
 
Jan 14, 2006
1,103
651
1,743
I said it's a tough balance and that we are mainly leaning to on one side more than the other... In a free society we are ok to point that out...Good luck with the cold.... I hope that is all that it is and you are fine. NO ONE wants anyone's death on their hands. That's why I'm wearing gloves and mask at work and social distancing. This as a lot of my friends are being laid off as of today (600 or so of them) in the hospital that is my main client...this due to them not being able to preform routine procedures in order to prepare for a surge...a surge that we all hope and pray never comes. Stay Healthy and God Bless.
This is the first real sign that we've maybe gone too far. Hospital employees are being laid off because we are trying too hard to make space available that we might not need. Maybe there's more to this story but we can't make the cure worse than the disease.
 

jakeman

Unhinged Idiot
A/V Subscriber
Apr 4, 2005
7,439
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Limbo
2 weeks ago I thought Iran was a 3rd world country who because they were digging trenches to bury their dead as confirmed by satellite photos

Now we are doing it in NYC in parks.

It's just a contingency plan as of now, but they are preparing for this to happen. This is grim. Really really grim.

In a city the size of NYC, you'd think they could handle more stiffs than this. There has to be a bunch of people up there that die every day, just because it's their time, or due to crime and other natural and unnatural causes. To think that a city that size is being overrun with dead to the point they are going to start interment in parks, in mass graves.

Holy. Shit.
 

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
21,254
9,450
1,743
Earth
It's just a contingency plan as of now, but they are preparing for this to happen. This is grim. Really really grim.

In a city the size of NYC, you'd think they could handle more stiffs than this. There has to be a bunch of people up there that die every day, just because it's their time, or due to crime and other natural and unnatural causes. To think that a city that size is being overrun with dead to the point they are going to start interment in parks, in mass graves.

Holy. Shit.
The Governor of NY just denied that this is the case live on CBS...at least not yesterday when he talked to the Mayor of NYC...He said he had heard lots of crazy stories, but had not heard this one. My thought is that this is likely a gross exaggeration as Governor Como inferred.
 

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
32,086
16,246
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Stupid about AGW!!
. My thought is that this is likely a gross exaggeration as Governor Como inferred.
So the Chairman of the New York City Council on Health who has been working on this is said they Medical Examiners office has 100's of people working 24/7 on how to deal with a mass death event and who is the Chair of the council that just approved this contingency plan this morning if deaths continue at this level is just grossly exaggerating the work he is doing?

Exaggerating about the Plan his committee just voted to pass this morning?

This entire event Rack you have consistently tried to push this narrative that somehow this isn't as bad as everyone is saying and looking for some way to dismiss reality.

US just went over 10k known deaths
330K+ have tested positve
NYC deaths due to Coronavirus quadrupled last week
1.5K Americans are dying every day right now and that number increasing and we don't know where the ceiling on that number is
 
Nov 26, 2006
855
197
1,593
So the Chairman of the New York City Council on Health who has been working on this is said they Medical Examiners office has 100's of people working 24/7 on how to deal with a mass death event and who is the Chair of the council that just approved this contingency plan this morning if deaths continue at this level is just grossly exaggerating the work he is doing?

Exaggerating about the Plan his committee just voted to pass this morning?

This entire event Rack you have consistently tried to push this narrative that somehow this isn't as bad as everyone is saying and looking for some way to dismiss reality.

US just went over 10k known deaths
330K+ have tested positve
NYC deaths due to Coronavirus quadrupled last week
1.5K Americans are dying every day right now and that number increasing and we don't know where the ceiling on that number is
 
Jan 14, 2006
1,103
651
1,743
So the Chairman of the New York City Council on Health who has been working on this is said they Medical Examiners office has 100's of people working 24/7 on how to deal with a mass death event and who is the Chair of the council that just approved this contingency plan this morning if deaths continue at this level is just grossly exaggerating the work he is doing?

Exaggerating about the Plan his committee just voted to pass this morning?

This entire event Rack you have consistently tried to push this narrative that somehow this isn't as bad as everyone is saying and looking for some way to dismiss reality.

US just went over 10k known deaths
330K+ have tested positve
NYC deaths due to Coronavirus quadrupled last week
1.5K Americans are dying every day right now and that number increasing and we don't know where the ceiling on that number is
It went down yesterday.