Big 12 Realignment thread, 2021 version

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What conference would you like to see OSU join?

  • ACC

  • Big Ten

  • PAC-12

  • Expanded Big 12

  • Other (please explain)


Results are only viewable after voting.
Nov 25, 2009
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Can't believe I never considered this. We can't sacrifice playing Texas teams. It would kill recruiting. That pretty much seals the PAC being the best option for me. As I think we eventually hit merger and geographic realignment it is more important to keep our sports relevant than to go to a high paying conference now. I'm going to guess it is us, Tech, Baylor, KSU who go to the PAC. Baylor's religious affiliation may screw it with the PAC so it could be TCU who is, but less so.
Not playing Texas teams as frequent will surely hurt recruiting.

During Big8 days, OU and Nebraska were raiding top Texas players without playing any Texas teams (except the Red River rivalries). We then as usual were getting leftovers, players with connections (huge alumni base in Dallas and Houston) or some projects with potentials diamond in the rough. Our proximity to Dallas, East Texas and North West Louisiana is not going away. Since we were always like that, we will continue to be like that. Our recruiting will not going to hurt badly like Nebraska when they started looking overrated recruits northwards after joining BIG.

I love Oklahoma recruits. Like oSu, OK HS players were always underrated, football savvy, unassuming, bleed orange etc. Once 0U keep tussling and rivalry against Georgia, LSU and Florida for talents in the south, two thirds of top instate talents will be ours. ...and few Kansas players here and there & now and thenh to ice the cake.

IF TCU and Tech or Baylor were to join us to where-ever, we will be better off in Texas HS football players eyes than those BIG8 days.

Since we develop 4* players rather than recruit 4*, we will be OK recruiting wise.
Our OL recruiting is more of a concern even right now while sleeping together with the whorn in Texas recruiting hot bed.

I am more concern about the uncertainty and shifts in the soul of NCAA football,
.
 
May 31, 2007
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Why did ou do it? They had the same situation, just a litte less cash. Many. many people want more just because it's more. They don't care who gets in the way.
OU is doing it because they know they’ll never win a NC playing in the Big 12. They’ll never get elite athletes on the defensive side of the ball (the true holy grail of recruiting) playing in this 2nd tier conference. Their only shot is joining the SEC and convincing elite defensive recruits that playing for them is no longer a detriment to their draft status.
 
Nov 25, 2009
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Bowlsby should be fired Monday morning.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nc...-played-by-greg-sankey-and-the-sec/ar-AAMunPu

Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby got played by Greg Sankey and the SEC
Wescott Eberts 22 mins ago


If the Big 12 ends up dissolving after the Texas Longhorns and Oklahoma Sooners officially receive invitations to join the SEC, a move likely to win approval as soon as next week, commissioner Bob Bowlsby deserves some of the blame.
© Kevin Jairaj-USA TODAY Sports
Hired from Stanford in 2012 to help lead the new version of the conference following the departures of four original members and the additions of TCU and West Virginia, Bowlsby faced the challenge of finalizing negotiations for Big 12 media rights and pulling together a conference split by the failures of his predecessor Dan Beebe.

But if Bowlsby’s legacy leading the Big 12 depends on the vision he’s displayed over the last year — or the lack thereof — it won’t be a positive one. In particular, he failed to recognize the extent to which Texas and Oklahoma wanted to get out of the conference, moves precipitated by leadership recently put in place. That failure of vision left Bowlsby and the conference unequipped to deal with the news when it finally, belatedly broke.

The signs were on the horizon, starting earlier this year.
With the SEC finalizing its new contract with Disney last December, the Big 12 hired a media consulting group that informed member institutions that the television partners were unwilling to engage in preemptive negotiations with the league, a strong sign that the Big 12 had fallen behind other Power Five conferences in valuation.

Meanwhile, Bowlsby was working with other commissioners like the SEC’s Greg Sankey on the College Football Playoff Board of Managers to initiate a feasibility study to expand the College Football Playoff to 12 teams, a move that stood to benefit the nation’s most powerful football conference much more than the Big 12.
During the process, Bowlsby publicly praised Sankey for his work on the board of managers.

But Sankey wasn’t focused on what was best for college football — he was doing his job focusing on the best interests of the SEC.

When Big 12 Media Days arrived, Bowlsby was not only unaware of any potential threats to his conference, he believed that concerns about realignment were a thing of the past. For the final question of his press conference, Bowlsby indicated that he’d invested more thought in whether he might receive another question about Big 12 expansion, joking that he’d won a five-dollar bet when it never came.

“It’s really moot on that question. Conference alignment is always at the discretion of the conferences. But you have to remember, the last time around, the last round of conference realignments was all driven by cable households, and we find ourselves now in a rapidly shrinking cable environment. It is much less driven by capturing a particular cable market because if it’s an in-market fee, you get a lot more money for it than if it’s an out-of-market fee. So the more you can include those things, the more revenue you’re going to derive from it,” Bowlsby said.

“That motivation is essentially gone. The cable universe has shrunk 20 million households already. It’s going to continue to shrink as we migrate to digital consumption and streaming. And so a lot of the motivation for realignment is no longer there.”

Bowlsby acknowledge that some of the motivation could still be there, but noted that “it’s not one of the things that keeps me up at night.”

Perhaps it should have, because for at least the last year, Texas and Oklahoma were planning the move to the SEC while engaging in back-channel communications with other leagues like the ACC, according to Pete Thamel of Yahoo Sports.

Even if Bowlsby didn’t have expansion on his radar, the pending end of the Big 12’s grant of rights and the dissatisfaction of Texas and Oklahoma made those two schools some of the only expansion candidates that television partners would actually pay to add.
Bowlsby seemed oblivious to that reality as the two schools and Sankey did such a good job of keeping those discussions quiet that the news didn’t emerge until this week at SEC Media Days, presumably when Texas A&M finally found out about the plans and leaked the news in an attempt to sabotage the addition of Texas that it opposed.

The Big 12 was left in a completely reactionary position, holding an emergency conference call with leadership on Thursday evening. By that time, Texas and Oklahoma weren’t even interested in joining in those discussions, having moved past the point of anything convincing them to stay.
In the most critical moment of his nearly 10 years leading the Big 12, Bowlsby was left without the option of even making a last-second pitch to his two most important member institutions.
It’s a ruthless business and while Bowlsby was sleeping soundly at night, exhausted from the demands imposed by the pandemic, Sankey was busy scheming to form the nation’s first super conference by adding two of the biggest programs in college sports.
And that’s exactly the type of bold, effective leadership that further puts into perspective why Texas and Oklahoma were so intent on leaving the Big 12 and focused on joining the SEC in the first place.
Espionage!

He work for Texas , not the BIG12.
 
Nov 25, 2009
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I saw someone on Twitter say that Texas is like the most high maintenance girlfriend ever...She demands all of your time and attention and money...the minute she feels unhappy or gets a better opportunity she'll cheat on you.
Very demanding and high maintenance, but we are living of her wealth and fame.

Take and Give.
 

marvin7

Greenhorn
Dec 12, 2020
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There is zero chance we play bedlam football for at least ten years , unless we meet up in postseason or something. OSU will hold the grudge as Texas did with the aggies + HCMG will have no appetite for that as a non con. Ou won’t schedule it either because with an SEC schedule they are going to go all cupcakes in the non con and won’t want their season spoiled by an in state rival with extra motivation.
Although I've got too much pride to want to stop playing our rival just because we usually lose, from a more rational perspective, it's a really good point that Mike Gundy shouldn't want any part of winning once every ten years...against any team. And as you implied, in the SEC, OU won't need OSU as a springboard to high rankings. That said, it's gotta be at least a little tempting, from OU's perspective, to keep that yearly win against a ranked opponent thing going.
 
Sep 8, 2014
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So right now it looks like if Notre Dame stays independent, we could get asked to join the ACC with West Virginia or we could go west to the PAC with a travel partner, either Tech or TCU if the conference expands, right?

Those are the best two options on the table at this time....

That or we join the AAC....(uggg)

At least CBS says we are the most “valuable player” left in the big twelve...whatever that means...
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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Just a thought. Nebraska and A&M left because of having to deal with Texas. With Texas leaving, Nebraska may consider coming back to the Big 12 and A&M has made it clear they don't want to be in the same conference with Texas as well. If these two teams returned to the Big 12, would it be enough to save the conference?
I know I'm way behind on the thread, but I'll put in my two cents. Even if they came back or said they wanted to come back, the only way to save this conference would be to then also add four more teams on top of that somehow to get to 16. I just don't think there's any way to compete with the SEC at that point without being in a 16 team conference.

Edit:. I meant add 6 more teams. Of course we are 12 in name only. Duh.

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Last edited:
Sep 29, 2011
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Did I see somewhere that OSU is the 3rd most watched B12 team? Add that to the quality of the programs, certainly we’re the most attractive program (ignoring academics) to any conference seeking to expand.

We should be okay.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

OstatePokes

Territorial Marshal
Aug 24, 2007
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Did I see somewhere that OSU is the 3rd most watched B12 team? Add that to the quality of the programs, certainly we’re the most attractive program (ignoring academics) to any conference seeking to expand.

We should be okay.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Overall I agree. I am far more optimistic today than I was Tuesday night when the first rumors were coming out, but it will be nice to see something official. It’s interesting how Kansas and the remaining Texas schools have all officially reached out to conferences. I can’t tell if we are about to end up with multiple offers or no offers.
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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Bowlsby should be fired Monday morning.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nc...-played-by-greg-sankey-and-the-sec/ar-AAMunPu

Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby got played by Greg Sankey and the SEC
Wescott Eberts 22 mins ago


If the Big 12 ends up dissolving after the Texas Longhorns and Oklahoma Sooners officially receive invitations to join the SEC, a move likely to win approval as soon as next week, commissioner Bob Bowlsby deserves some of the blame.
Kevin Jairaj-USA TODAY Sports
Hired from Stanford in 2012 to help lead the new version of the conference following the departures of four original members and the additions of TCU and West Virginia, Bowlsby faced the challenge of finalizing negotiations for Big 12 media rights and pulling together a conference split by the failures of his predecessor Dan Beebe.

But if Bowlsby’s legacy leading the Big 12 depends on the vision he’s displayed over the last year — or the lack thereof — it won’t be a positive one. In particular, he failed to recognize the extent to which Texas and Oklahoma wanted to get out of the conference, moves precipitated by leadership recently put in place. That failure of vision left Bowlsby and the conference unequipped to deal with the news when it finally, belatedly broke.

The signs were on the horizon, starting earlier this year.
With the SEC finalizing its new contract with Disney last December, the Big 12 hired a media consulting group that informed member institutions that the television partners were unwilling to engage in preemptive negotiations with the league, a strong sign that the Big 12 had fallen behind other Power Five conferences in valuation.

Meanwhile, Bowlsby was working with other commissioners like the SEC’s Greg Sankey on the College Football Playoff Board of Managers to initiate a feasibility study to expand the College Football Playoff to 12 teams, a move that stood to benefit the nation’s most powerful football conference much more than the Big 12.
During the process, Bowlsby publicly praised Sankey for his work on the board of managers.

But Sankey wasn’t focused on what was best for college football — he was doing his job focusing on the best interests of the SEC.

When Big 12 Media Days arrived, Bowlsby was not only unaware of any potential threats to his conference, he believed that concerns about realignment were a thing of the past. For the final question of his press conference, Bowlsby indicated that he’d invested more thought in whether he might receive another question about Big 12 expansion, joking that he’d won a five-dollar bet when it never came.

“It’s really moot on that question. Conference alignment is always at the discretion of the conferences. But you have to remember, the last time around, the last round of conference realignments was all driven by cable households, and we find ourselves now in a rapidly shrinking cable environment. It is much less driven by capturing a particular cable market because if it’s an in-market fee, you get a lot more money for it than if it’s an out-of-market fee. So the more you can include those things, the more revenue you’re going to derive from it,” Bowlsby said.

“That motivation is essentially gone. The cable universe has shrunk 20 million households already. It’s going to continue to shrink as we migrate to digital consumption and streaming. And so a lot of the motivation for realignment is no longer there.”

Bowlsby acknowledge that some of the motivation could still be there, but noted that “it’s not one of the things that keeps me up at night.”

Perhaps it should have, because for at least the last year, Texas and Oklahoma were planning the move to the SEC while engaging in back-channel communications with other leagues like the ACC, according to Pete Thamel of Yahoo Sports.

Even if Bowlsby didn’t have expansion on his radar, the pending end of the Big 12’s grant of rights and the dissatisfaction of Texas and Oklahoma made those two schools some of the only expansion candidates that television partners would actually pay to add.
Bowlsby seemed oblivious to that reality as the two schools and Sankey did such a good job of keeping those discussions quiet that the news didn’t emerge until this week at SEC Media Days, presumably when Texas A&M finally found out about the plans and leaked the news in an attempt to sabotage the addition of Texas that it opposed.

The Big 12 was left in a completely reactionary position, holding an emergency conference call with leadership on Thursday evening. By that time, Texas and Oklahoma weren’t even interested in joining in those discussions, having moved past the point of anything convincing them to stay.
In the most critical moment of his nearly 10 years leading the Big 12, Bowlsby was left without the option of even making a last-second pitch to his two most important member institutions.
It’s a ruthless business and while Bowlsby was sleeping soundly at night, exhausted from the demands imposed by the pandemic, Sankey was busy scheming to form the nation’s first super conference by adding two of the biggest programs in college sports.
And that’s exactly the type of bold, effective leadership that further puts into perspective why Texas and Oklahoma were so intent on leaving the Big 12 and focused on joining the SEC in the first place.
To be honest, no matter what Bowlsby said at media days, this man has no idea what was being done behind the scenes. In a week's time we could come out shocked because Bowlsby pulled off something because he's been working behind the scenes for the last 6 months. Granted that's not necessarily the actual outcome, but articles like this are nothing but meant to fan the flames. I wonder if it was written by an SEC alum?

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