Branding Success has now topped $900M

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BeatOU

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http://www.osugiving.com/page.aspx?pid=1092

Oklahoma State University campaign tops $900 million on its way to $1 billion goal

New major gifts help push total for 2011-12 to $157.3 million

Branding Success: The Campaign for Oklahoma State University has raised $906.1 million and attracted support from 77,621 donors as the campaign’s tremendous momentum continues to push the University closer to its goal of raising $1 billion. The campaign has created 853 new scholarships and 133 new endowed faculty positions.
For the one-year period from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, the University received support totaling $157.3 million, which far exceeded the goal of $120 million, according to a report from the OSU Foundation.
 

BeatOU

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Student Support: Goal$500 million; Raised$452.1 million
      • Secure an unprecedented level of student scholarship support, inviting students to dream big, work hard and exceed expectations through life-changing opportunities
Faculty Support: Goal$200 million; Raised−$184.8 million
      • More than double the number of endowed professorships and chairs, securing OSU’s ability to retain and recruit the best faculty
Facility Support: Goal$200 million; Raised−$178.3 million
      • Equip students and faculty with advanced facilities essential to community building and discovery in the 21st century
Program Support: Goal−$100 million; Raised$90.9 million
      • Invest in academic excellence with innovative, interdisciplinary programs that make the most of OSU’s considerable strengths
 

jobob85

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http://www.osugiving.com/page.aspx?pid=1092

Oklahoma State University campaign tops $900 million on its way to $1 billion goal

New major gifts help push total for 2011-12 to $157.3 million

Branding Success: The Campaign for Oklahoma State University has raised $906.1 million and attracted support from 77,621 donors as the campaign’s tremendous momentum continues to push the University closer to its goal of raising $1 billion. The campaign has created 853 new scholarships and 133 new endowed faculty positions.
For the one-year period from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, the University received support totaling $157.3 million, which far exceeded the goal of $120 million, according to a report from the OSU Foundation.
Nice. After reading the article I need to look at making a donation to the new Spears Business School building fund.
 

CowboyOrangeFan

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Great news! Can somebody with wiki access update our endowment numbers? :thumbup:
I didn't see anything in that article that listed updated endowment numbers (which I would be very interested to see). Keep in mind, $900 million toward the campaign, doesn't equal $900 million endowment.

Although I would bet that our endowment is pushing close to that number. Unfortunately the most recent report on the foundation site still lists the endowment at $350 million (2010). I know it is a lot more than that. I just haven't seen anything official.
 
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Great news! Can somebody with wiki access update our endowment numbers? :thumbup:
Interesting article on endowment. OSU's endowment is nearly $500,000,000. OSU professor in article says (See highlight in red below). Remember Endowment is not the branding campaign.

http://www.ocpathink.org/articles/1031

Oklahoma’s college presidents and higher-education bureaucrats are always asking for more money (no surprise there; that’s what governments do). But Professor Vance Fried pointed out something this week that often goes unnoticed: “The wealth of American colleges is massive.”
Dr. Fried, a lawyer and a CPA, is the Riata Professor of Entrepreneurship at Oklahoma State University. He has written for OCPA in the past, and is the author of a new book called Better/Cheaper College: An Entrepreneur's Guide to Rescuing the Higher Education Industry. In a new article called “The Endowment Trap,” Dr. Fried discusses the massive endowment funds of many colleges and universities.
For example, the University of Oklahoma has an endowment of nearly a billion dollars. Oklahoma State University’s endowment is nearly half a billion dollars. “These substantial holdings of financial assets (stocks, bonds, etc.) make non-profit colleges and universities very different from for-profit businesses,” Dr. Fried observes. “Except for the financial industry, for-profit companies rarely own a significant amount of financial assets. They maintain enough for working capital needs and hold financial assets short- to medium-term with an eye to reinvestment in productive assets or for return to shareholders.
“Non-profit colleges, however, hold substantial funds in an ‘endowment’ with no intention of ever spending any of the principal. In fact, they often do not spend all the income their endowment generates in order to protect the endowment’s purchasing power against inflation.”
Dr. Fried asks a simple question that perhaps many people have never considered: “Why should a school create a fund that it never intends to spend?” After all, “schools aren’t trust companies; they are educational institutions.
“These colleges are like poor little rich kids fixated upon their wealth. Although rich, they constantly complain about not having enough money to cover their needs. Although rich, they constantly try to get more money out of their students and society at large. They continue to build their endowments even though each dollar added to endowment represents a dollar that could have gone to providing an education to current students, researching today’s great problems, or to reducing tuition. …
“The task of preserving financial wealth for future generations is for a trust company, not a college. Colleges and universities best serve future generations by devoting their resources to their educational mission in the present.”
Dr. Fried makes the case—and again, I urge you to read the whole thing—that “excess endowments are a non-productive use of society’s limited resources. If a college has excess assets, then it should figure out how to put them to a productive use over the next twenty years. Spend them on research to cure cancer, or start a partner college in Africa, or give full-ride scholarships to low-income students, or build a small cathedral. Or be really radical and cut tuition.
“In the late twentieth century, organization scholars like Oliver Williamson and Michael Jensen found that a large amount of excess resources (organizational slack) leads to low productivity in any type of organization. That excess reduced internal discipline. Money gets spent without good justification, managers feather their nests at the organization’s expense, and weak-performing employees are tolerated.”
Oklahoma voters can sense the organizational slack. Here’s hoping Dr. Fried’s article will spur some discussion on how to increase productivity.
 

ScooberJake

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#18
Interesting article on endowment...

excess endowments are a non-productive use of society’s limited resources. If a college has excess assets, then it should figure out how to put them to a productive use over the next twenty years. Spend them on research to cure cancer, or start a partner college in Africa, or give full-ride scholarships to low-income students, or build a small cathedral. Or be really radical and cut tuition."


That is interesting. I can see the point. But not-for-profit organizations have historically relied on endowments to operate. This practice goes back for centuries. The point is to ensure the future of an organization in perpetuity. Could we make OSU a really awesome place over the next 20 years by doing what Fried suggests? You bet! But what then? By spending the endowment, you are by definition operating at a deficit. What happens when the cash runs out? I suppose his point is that by making OSU such an awesome place you hope to bring more cash in, thus offsetting all the spending. But I'm not convinced that would work. And I'm certainly not willing to bet the future of OSU on such a gamble.