Cedars.

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swamppoke

ole 3 putt.
A/V Subscriber
Feb 11, 2004
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The Sand Shaker
#22
Just curious, but why would you want to do that?
Years ago, people were paid to plant wind fences of cedars. Now there are programs to pay you to get rid of them. They are an invasive species, and can cover hundreds, if not thousands of acres in a relatively short time, choking out other trees and native grasses. Their only true enemies are man and fire. drive towards enid from tulsa on 412 and you can see vast tracts of (what used to be) prairie covered by cedars.
 

jakeman

Unhinged Idiot
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Apr 4, 2005
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Limbo
#23
Years ago, people were paid to plant wind fences of cedars. Now there are programs to pay you to get rid of them. They are an invasive species, and can cover hundreds, if not thousands of acres in a relatively short time, choking out other trees and native grasses. Their only true enemies are man and fire. drive towards enid from tulsa on 412 and you can see vast tracts of (what used to be) prairie covered by cedars.
That is it in a nutshell.


'Cause we don't let the prairie burn any more.

Prairie fire is a wonderful thing, for the prairie. Not so much for the structures people build on the prairie. So people have prevailed, and the prairie has suffered.
 

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
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Earth
#32
Don't they have any value as closets or cedar blocks to give the good smell and keep away moths? Seems like someone would buy them for the wood. There is currently a huge market in cities for pinon pine wood due to it's nice smell when burned. Why not red Cedar? Easter Red Cedar is actually a native species to Oklahoma, and indeed the suppression of fire on the prairie has led to it becoming invasive into prairie land. It's always been interesting to me because they do provide wildlife cover and wintertime evergreen landscape in areas where they are native which have somewhat rocky soil and aren't typically used for farming or ranching. Think areas around Keystone lake, the Osage Hills, Roman Nose State Park, Wichita Mountains. All of these areas wouldn't be the same without the Eastern Red Cedar. The problems arise when they invade crop and cattle land. I would think that we could find an economic solution that creates a demand for them to be removed from unwanted areas rather than just old fashion slash and burn?
 

wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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#34
Only thing I've found cedar good for, are walking sticks for hiking. Sturdy, but lightweight. Strip them, sand them, and treat them with orange oil and wax.

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Nov 16, 2013
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tractor
#35
Don't they have any value as closets or cedar blocks to give the good smell and keep away moths? Seems like someone would buy them for the wood. There is currently a huge market in cities for pinon pine wood due to it's nice smell when burned. Why not red Cedar? Easter Red Cedar is actually a native species to Oklahoma, and indeed the suppression of fire on the prairie has led to it becoming invasive into prairie land. It's always been interesting to me because they do provide wildlife cover and wintertime evergreen landscape in areas where they are native which have somewhat rocky soil and aren't typically used for farming or ranching. Think areas around Keystone lake, the Osage Hills, Roman Nose State Park, Wichita Mountains. All of these areas wouldn't be the same without the Eastern Red Cedar. The problems arise when they invade crop and cattle land. I would think that we could find an economic solution that creates a demand for them to be removed from unwanted areas rather than just old fashion slash and burn?
There is not much use for an Eastern red cedar except for fuel. One guy tried making pellets out of them, but the fire was to hot.