Guns and violence

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HeartLike_JohnStarks

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#41
...it'll take a sort of social awakening; what I mean is a movement towards the individual being responsible for their actions, and a respect for your fellow man...ya know, stuff that'll never happen...
Like I mentioned in hip hop thread, some things are just firmly entrenched, unfortunately, and its a combination of existing infrastructure (broken homes/family, broken/not strict enough education, etc) and culture. Things like contribute to the endless cycle of violence and instability.
Its easy to say pumping more wealth back into those parts , but most normal people don't want to risk opening businesses in those rough neighborhoods . Rather, the only businesses that seem to want to open down in those parts are the liquor stores (Hennessy's are an especially common drink in those parts btw ;) ) and 7Eleven's.


On a more practical note, we can probably cut down a decent chunk of gang violence and illegal arms dealing by focusing on our southern border *cough*.
The southern CA ghettos (ie Compton), Arizona, and some parts of Texas are responsible of a large chunk of the dope and weapons smuggling. The Cartels make our regular OG's like ballerinas.
 

HeartLike_JohnStarks

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#42
Here in PA you can walk into a gun store and walk out with a gun in about 10 minutes. The law is that unless they have a reason to not sell you a gun, they can sell it to you same day. The store just takes your id and makes a phone call. If everything checks out, you get your gun. That goes for ALL guns.
Which part of Philly do you live in? You've ever drove down to South Philly? ;)
 
#46
I wouldn't want to live in either part of the city, to be honest. I live in the suburbs to the north of the city. My wife teaches in a pretty rough part of the city, and our foster son is from southwest Philly, so we are in that area a lot for his visits with his family. Philly is a fascinating city. There will be a section of broken down, crime-riddled, burned-out homes just a block or two from a very well to do section. I have lived in and visited a lot of other parts of the country, but I have never seen the stark contrasts and odd juxtapositions that I have seen here.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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#49
Insuring that abortion remains legal and gasoline stays unleaded. ;)
Just so long as I can keep lead in my pencil.

We can't.

Freedom has a price. And the price of the Second Amendment is increased gun deaths.
I don't buy it. Or, if that is really true, if we really cannot have freedom to keep and bear without the violence, then maybe it is really time to give up the freedom.
 

naranjaynegro

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#50
When it comes to violent crime, all studies I have ever seen show that harsh penalties, including the death penalty, are not a significant deterrent.
The problem is that the legal system slows it down. I'm convinced that if justice was fast, you'd see a definite decline. Capital crimes need to take precedent on the court docket and all the other crap (petty individual drug user) needs to be done away with or taken to some secondary court.
Does Malaysia, Singapore, etc. have a drug problem? No, I'd say not because the first thing you read on the customs forms, in the airport...is that drug possession is punishable by death. And they mean it.
 

OP150

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#51
The problem won't be resolved until the government realizes it is not their job to baby society. A return to self accountability would be the first step followed by actually making incarceration a punishment. There are three basic needs for a human being; Shelter, Clothing and Food. Nothing more than that should be provided or allowed in a penal instituion. Inmates now "live it up" in comparison to some citizens who are working their ass off to make it day to day. Incarceration just doesn't have any bite to it.

Once you fix those two issues, you have to enforce the laws on the books. I am all for cutting someone a break when it is appropriate but too many receive a break just for the convenience it provides the prosecutor. It shouldn't matter if it's your first offence, etc. If you commit the act, the prosecution of that violation should be followed as written in statute. Don't pawn it off "until next time" when most likely the offense will be worse and you'll simply just create another victim.

I say all that to specifically state that we need to enforce the gun laws on the books as written. Felon in possession? Hammer them. If they are off of the street they aren't posing a problem. Use a firearm in the commission of a crime? Make it an automatic aggrivating factor for sentencing.

More regulation is not the key. Eliminating the NFA tax or even allowing machineguns again wouldn't raise the crime rate. There are plenty of those weapons on the streets as is and if they want one, they'll take it.
 

CocoCincinnati

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#52
Dumb question from me (I don't own guns). What good does the 53rd gun do you? One man can only carry so many guns. Aren't you just at some point allowing people to arm themselves as well as others?
Well I would imagine in a situation like we are discussing, there might be other people getting involved who don't have a gun themselves. And from a ligistical stanpoint, why would any military/police organization keep more weapons available than they have people? Why do we find large caches of weapons in Afghanistan that obviously aren't being used at that immediate time? The same rules would apply in this situation.
 

CocoCincinnati

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#53
I get the constituational argument and potential revolution and all that, but do you really think the revolution is going to come down to some assault rifles and handguns or do you think it will come down to control of the military as it does in most countries (e.g. Egypt, Syria)? I don't care how well armed the Michigan Militia has become, if they tried actual revolt it would take all of four hours to...

I think we've seen plenty of examples lately of what a loosely organized, low tech but highly motivated group can do aganist a high tech military. And if things ever got bad enough that something like that happened here, then who's to say what's going to happen with the military or whether the UN would help or whether France will blockade the Chesapeake, etc.

And even in the example you pointed to, the cartoon rabbits did survive. ;)