Homecoming Festivities Canceled

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PF5

Wrangler
Jan 3, 2014
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#21
Thing is, my kid and many others are saying the professors are telling them in person classes will only last 2 weeks then they are going online. Also, many student's classes have now changed to showing as "online" in their schedules instead of showing locations on campus.

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that would be about right...let me pay for a whole year of apartment rent as my kid sits at home...
 
Sep 23, 2018
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#23
I've heard from a student that the word on the street is probably about three weeks and then they will go to strictly online, but at this point who knows. Administration HAS to act like its full steam ahead as to not cause a panic and a majority of people dropping classes or enrolling in cheaper online classes elsewhere. But lets be honest here once COVID starts making its way through the many dorms and from there throughout stillwater there's not a thing they can do to stop it. My friend calls me a negative Nancy, maybe I am, but I also am a realist about 18-23 year olds making good decisions about social distancing. It's not going to happen. I would give football playing a complete 10 game schedule about a 15% chance and much lower percentage than that at OSU concluding its in person semester at Thanksgiving.
 
Aug 22, 2006
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#24
Everyone acts like this is the black death, maybe if you are 70 years old but not if you are under 40. This is ridiculous. If I were a student I would absolutely hate living in this time. I can't imagine walking around constantly in fear over something that's turning out to be way less deadly than the flu is for people under 25 years old. More people in that age bracket will be effected by pre 2020 conditions than covid.
 
Jan 21, 2006
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#25
Everyone acts like this is the black death, maybe if you are 70 years old but not if you are under 40. This is ridiculous. If I were a student I would absolutely hate living in this time. I can't imagine walking around constantly in fear over something that's turning out to be way less deadly than the flu is for people under 25 years old. More people in that age bracket will be effected by pre 2020 conditions than covid.
I agree and I am 75. We are all terminal, but just don't know the date.
 
Feb 18, 2009
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#26
While a part of me agrees, the town of Stillwater is heavily dependent on football games and even homecoming itself. I can't see how the town's economy does anything but collapse. It may recover quickly, but it's going to be very painful and may lose a solid chunk of its population. I'm not saying I have a solution, but this sucks horrendously bad.
Now extrapolate that over all the college towns that survive off their host. The impact is astronomical.
 

El Gato Bandito

that log had a child
Jan 5, 2009
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#27
Everyone acts like this is the black death, maybe if you are 70 years old but not if you are under 40. This is ridiculous. If I were a student I would absolutely hate living in this time. I can't imagine walking around constantly in fear over something that's turning out to be way less deadly than the flu is for people under 25 years old. More people in that age bracket will be effected by pre 2020 conditions than covid.
159,000 Americans have died from this virus in less than a year. What more will it take for you to view this as dangerous? Comparing this to flu is asinine.

Younger people may not die from it in higher percentages, but even one dying from it when it can be prevented is why these decisions are being made, and it’s the correct decision.
 
Feb 18, 2009
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#28
Everyone acts like this is the black death, maybe if you are 70 years old but not if you are under 40. This is ridiculous. If I were a student I would absolutely hate living in this time. I can't imagine walking around constantly in fear over something that's turning out to be way less deadly than the flu is for people under 25 years old. More people in that age bracket will be effected by pre 2020 conditions than covid.
My son starts the trip back today and will be in the house this weekend. Never considered keeping him home.

College is a once in a lifetime experience and goes by really fast, this year won't even look like college. He keeps relaying the "guidelines" from the school and IFC and it's depressing. It's also setting up for failure as they're college kids, they already think they're invincible and will rebel against much less. Is what it is.
 

OSUCowboy787

Territorial Marshal
Dec 31, 2008
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#29
Couldn't agree more. My son starts the trip back today and will be in the house this weekend.

College is a once in a lifetime experience and goes by really fast, this year won't even look like college. He keeps relaying the "guidelines" from the school and IFC and it's depressing. It's also setting up for failure as they're college kids, they already think they're invincible and will rebel against much less. Is what it is.
Exactly. Does anyone really think you're going to keep college kids away from each other if they are living in the same city? Guessing the intramural, Colvin and especially party scene are thriving as always in Stillwater this year.
 
May 31, 2007
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#30
159,000 Americans have died from this virus in less than a year. What more will it take for you to view this as dangerous? Comparing this to flu is asinine.

Younger people may not die from it in higher percentages, but even one dying from it when it can be prevented is why these decisions are being made, and it’s the correct decision.
He’s comparing it to the flu specifically in the younger age brackets. Flu is 7 to 9 times more likely to kill those in the school and college age range than Covid. It’s a more than fair point to bring up since zero precautions are taken for the flu on a comparative basis.
 
Feb 18, 2009
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#31
159,000 Americans have died from this virus in less than a year. What more will it take for you to view this as dangerous? Comparing this to flu is asinine.

Younger people may not die from it in higher percentages, but even one dying from it when it can be prevented is why these decisions are being made, and it’s the correct decision.
Directly from the CDC.

Screen Shot 2020-08-06 at 12.37.10 PM.png


Deaths for people under 25 years of age, 25-44 and 45-64 this year compared to 2015-2019. Additionally, take out 65 and older from your numbers and compare the excess deaths of each age group which is also available on the same CDC page. This is simple data that you can adjust on their site by age, sex, timeframe, state, etc.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cases-updates/us-cases-deaths.html

I am not making light of the virus, I do not want it. High risk, co-morbidity groups need to be very careful. Under 45 has to find a way to get back to life and the data says we should. Deaths in that group are actually less in week 32 of 2020 than in 2015-2019. The "cure" at this point is worse than the virus and the economic bill hasn't even come due yet. Everyone in the country will feel what's coming in their wallet. A small % will actually get sick, even smaller be hospitalized, even smaller ventilated, even smaller will die. 100% will feel the economic impact of what our "leaders" are doing.

edit: additional info from CDC regarding deaths 0-36 years of age.

https://twitter.com/kerpen/status/1286159555848806406?s=21
 
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CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
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#32
159,000 Americans have died from this virus in less than a year. What more will it take for you to view this as dangerous? Comparing this to flu is asinine.

Younger people may not die from it in higher percentages, but even one dying from it when it can be prevented is why these decisions are being made, and it’s the correct decision.
The virus is dangerous but so are many other things that we dismiss without a second thought...there are in fact more risky things in the world to this age group than covid.

For example, You would never argue that preventing even one death in a car accident is reason that students shouldn't drive to class and use that to force everybody to go online.

Leaving your house is risky....that's not a reason for everybody to stay home. Those more at risk should take every precaution, inclufing staying home...those less at risk need to get the country moving again.
 
Jun 18, 2010
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#33
While a part of me agrees, the town of Stillwater is heavily dependent on football games and even homecoming itself. I can't see how the town's economy does anything but collapse. It may recover quickly, but it's going to be very painful and may lose a solid chunk of its population. I'm not saying I have a solution, but this sucks horrendously bad.
No way can Stillwater economy possibly collapse. While not as much as it used to be, Stillwater is a blue collar college town from the industrial plants. Also people from neighboring towns help support the economy.

But too bad Stillwater has had no luck in attracting industry from airline service to Dallas since startup in 2016. I mostly blame that on Republicans in the Oklahoma Legislature making Oklahoma look like a backward hick state that won't adequately support education. Texas is also hard to compete with for attracting industry.
 
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Jun 18, 2010
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#34
That will be an issue, but it's tough to say how big. In person classes are far more popular and schools that announced in person classes fared better with enrollment than those who did online only. On the other hand, Stillwater may get hit with a public health crisis from students spreading it in a fairly small town. That combination may send students home early, which would further kill its economy. We'll find out in a little over a month about how bad it's going to be.
If students signed leases they will be stuck in Stillwater until the lease ends.
 
Jun 18, 2010
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Where else but Stillwater
#35
Everyone acts like this is the black death, maybe if you are 70 years old but not if you are under 40. This is ridiculous. If I were a student I would absolutely hate living in this time. I can't imagine walking around constantly in fear over something that's turning out to be way less deadly than the flu is for people under 25 years old. More people in that age bracket will be effected by pre 2020 conditions than covid.
Even young people can't be 100% sure their case of covid will be mild and brief with no lingering after effects. Covid irreversibly destroyed the lungs of this woman requiring her to get a double lung transplant.
https://www.livescience.com/covid-19-double-lung-transplant.html
 
Aug 22, 2006
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#36
I can't be 100% sure I won't have a fatal accident today either. I don't want to fear what is highly unlikely to effect me to the extent that I would give up a once in a lifetime event.

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May 4, 2011
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#38
No way can Stillwater economy possibly collapse. While not as much as it used to be, Stillwater is a blue collar college town from the industrial plants. Also people from neighboring towns help support the economy.

But too bad Stillwater has had no luck in attracting industry from airline service to Dallas since startup in 2016. I mostly blame that on Republicans in the Oklahoma Legislature making Oklahoma look like a backward hick state that won't adequately support education. Texas is also hard to compete with for attracting industry.
You may still have some industries, but sales taxes and property taxes will take a massive dip. Add that to drops in every retail and service industry. Nearly every restaurant, hair place, clothing store, grocery store, hotel, and other retailer depends on students being on campus to break even. Large portions of that are directly dependent on football games themselves (think restaurants, clothing, hotels, and other retail-even gas stations). Manufacturing and agriculture may largely stay in tact, but that's about it.
 
Feb 18, 2009
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#39
Even young people can't be 100% sure their case of covid will be mild and brief with no lingering after effects. Covid irreversibly destroyed the lungs of this woman requiring her to get a double lung transplant.
https://www.livescience.com/covid-19-double-lung-transplant.html
I know a 96 year old WWII vet that got it and is just fine.

Sound/rational decisions and strategies are not made/set on the far end of the extremes.

But since you went partisan I’m not surprised you choose to live on the edge of the bell curve. Republicans didn’t take control of the Oklahoma legislature until 2004. They gained control of the senate in 2010. Clearly they’re definitely to blame for all the state’s woes, not the 83-89 years of one party control. And I’m not a republican. Hyper partisanship is how we end up where we are now.
 
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Feb 18, 2009
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#40
You may still have some industries, but sales taxes and property taxes will take a massive dip. Add that to drops in every retail and service industry. Nearly every restaurant, hair place, clothing store, grocery store, hotel, and other retailer depends on students being on campus to break even. Large portions of that are directly dependent on football games themselves (think restaurants, clothing, hotels, and other retail-even gas stations). Manufacturing and agriculture may largely stay in tact, but that's about it.
No matter how clear and present the danger is, people refuse to see it. Lot of businesses in Stillwater in trouble.