Major world news - Osama Bin Laden Thread

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stonewallpoke

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Re: Major world news

I really think the speech was turned into a campaign speech. Obama deserves none of the credit, it was my brothers and sisters in uniform that did all the work and the guys in the intelligence community. The comment that HE directed the CIA director to make it his #1 priority. Are you kidding me that was thrown in for campaign reasons all the way, do you really not think Bush did the same thing?

This is a victory for all the families that have suffered from the events of 9/11 and all the American people. And mostly it is a victory for any of us who have been away from our family and friends for years doing what we can overseas. Great news was ruined by a campaign speech IMO.

But extremely grateful Osama is gonna rot in hell.
Any President, left or right, would've taken partial credit for the kill. He did, after all, have to approve the operation. He's the commander and chief. And he GAVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT WAS DUE. The only thing ruining the great news is that some people don't want Obama to have any credit because they don't like him personally or politically.

This country is so jaded by the political process that even the news that the most evil man since Adolph Hitler was killed pretty much the way we had all hoped (shot in the head by US forces) can't be taken in stride without political criticism from the other side of the aisle. C'mon, man.
 
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Re: Major world news

I really think the speech was turned into a campaign speech. Obama deserves none of the credit, it was my brothers and sisters in uniform that did all the work and the guys in the intelligence community. The comment that HE directed the CIA director to make it his #1 priority. Are you kidding me that was thrown in for campaign reasons all the way, do you really not think Bush did the same thing?

This is a victory for all the families that have suffered from the events of 9/11 and all the American people. And mostly it is a victory for any of us who have been away from our family and friends for years doing what we can overseas. Great news was ruined by a campaign speech IMO.

But extremely grateful Osama is gonna rot in hell.

Should have hung a giant banner from the Whitehouse huh ?
"MISSON ACCOMPLISHED"
 
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Re: Major world news

I really think the speech was turned into a campaign speech. Obama deserves none of the credit, it was my brothers and sisters in uniform that did all the work and the guys in the intelligence community. The comment that HE directed the CIA director to make it his #1 priority. Are you kidding me that was thrown in for campaign reasons all the way, do you really not think Bush did the same thing?

This is a victory for all the families that have suffered from the events of 9/11 and all the American people. And mostly it is a victory for any of us who have been away from our family and friends for years doing what we can overseas. Great news was ruined by a campaign speech IMO.

But extremely grateful Osama is gonna rot in hell.


I totally agree...thank you for your service and God Bless!
 

OSUMIKE17

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Re: Major world news

Any President, left or right, would've taken partial credit for the kill. He did, after all, have to approve the operation. He's the commander and chief. And he GAVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT WAS DUE. The only thing ruining the great news is that some people don't want Obama to have any credit because they don't like him personally or politically.

This country is so jaded by the political process that even the news that the most evil man since Adolph Hitler was killed pretty much the way we had all hoped (shot in the head by US forces) can't be taken in stride without political criticism from the other side of the aisle. C'mon, man.
I think what he is saying is that no president, right or left, should have taken that much credit for it. Rather, give all the credit to the men who carried out the task.
 

Orange_Blooded

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Re: Major world news

Guys... The most wanted man in the world is finally dead. Who cares wether the President took too much or gave too little credit. I like President Obama. I'm 16, most of ya'll will just discredit me; but I can tell you, that some of your petty arguments about this are childish and you're wasting time, when you should be happy and celebrating the comfort that has been brought to so many Americans and others around the world.
 
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Re: Major world news

I think what he is saying is that no president, right or left, should have taken that much credit for it. Rather, give all the credit to the men who carried out the task.
I'm pretty sure Presidents aren't trying to take credit when they use words like I and my:

"On my orders, coalition forces have begun striking selected targets of military importance to undermine Saddam Hussein's ability to wage war." -GWB

"Our war against terror is proceeding according to principles that I have made clear to all: Any person involved in committing or planning terrorist attacks against the American people becomes an enemy of this country, and a target of American justice."-GWB

This says everything:
"We give thanks for the men who carried out this operation, for they exemplify the professionalism, patriotism, and unparalleled courage of those who serve our country. And they are part of a generation that has borne the heaviest share of the burden since that September day."-Obama



This is certain:

"The war on terror is not over; yet it is not endless. We do not know the day of final victory, but we have seen the turning of the tide. No act of the terrorists will change our purpose, or weaken our resolve, or alter their fate. Their cause is lost. Free nations will press on to victory." - GWB

"The cause of securing our country is not complete. But tonight, we are once again reminded that America can do whatever we set our mind to." - Obama
 

stonewallpoke

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Re: Major world news

I think what he is saying is that no president, right or left, should have taken that much credit for it. Rather, give all the credit to the men who carried out the task.
And he did. It's not like he stood up there and said "I killed him". But he DID do what he claimed he did.

THE PRESIDENT: Good evening. Tonight, I can report to the American people and to the world that the United States has conducted an operation that killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of al Qaeda, and a terrorist who’s responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women, and children.

It was nearly 10 years ago that a bright September day was darkened by the worst attack on the American people in our history. The images of 9/11 are seared into our national memory -- hijacked planes cutting through a cloudless September sky; the Twin Towers collapsing to the ground; black smoke billowing up from the Pentagon; the wreckage of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, where the actions of heroic citizens saved even more heartbreak and destruction.

And yet we know that the worst images are those that were unseen to the world. The empty seat at the dinner table. Children who were forced to grow up without their mother or their father. Parents who would never know the feeling of their child’s embrace. Nearly 3,000 citizens taken from us, leaving a gaping hole in our hearts.

On September 11, 2001, in our time of grief, the American people came together. We offered our neighbors a hand, and we offered the wounded our blood. We reaffirmed our ties to each other, and our love of community and country. On that day, no matter where we came from, what God we prayed to, or what race or ethnicity we were, we were united as one American family.

We were also united in our resolve to protect our nation and to bring those who committed this vicious attack to justice. We quickly learned that the 9/11 attacks were carried out by al Qaeda -- an organization headed by Osama bin Laden, which had openly declared war on the United States and was committed to killing innocents in our country and around the globe. And so we went to war against al Qaeda to protect our citizens, our friends, and our allies.

Over the last 10 years, thanks to the tireless and heroic work of our military and our counterterrorism professionals, we’ve made great strides in that effort. We’ve disrupted terrorist attacks and strengthened our homeland defense. In Afghanistan, we removed the Taliban government, which had given bin Laden and al Qaeda safe haven and support. And around the globe, we worked with our friends and allies to capture or kill scores of al Qaeda terrorists, including several who were a part of the 9/11 plot.
Yet Osama bin Laden avoided capture and escaped across the Afghan border into Pakistan. Meanwhile, al Qaeda continued to operate from along that border and operate through its affiliates across the world.

And so shortly after taking office, I directed Leon Panetta, the director of the CIA, to make the killing or capture of bin Laden the top priority of our war against al Qaeda, even as we continued our broader efforts to disrupt, dismantle, and defeat his network.

Then, last August, after years of painstaking work by our intelligence community, I was briefed on a possible lead to bin Laden. It was far from certain, and it took many months to run this thread to ground. I met repeatedly with my national security team as we developed more information about the possibility that we had located bin Laden hiding within a compound deep inside of Pakistan. And finally, last week, I determined that we had enough intelligence to take action, and authorized an operation to get Osama bin Laden and bring him to justice.

Today, at my direction, the United States launched a targeted operation against that compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. A small team of Americans carried out the operation with extraordinary courage and capability. No Americans were harmed. They took care to avoid civilian casualties. After a firefight, they killed Osama bin Laden and took custody of his body.

For over two decades, bin Laden has been al Qaeda’s leader and symbol, and has continued to plot attacks against our country and our friends and allies. The death of bin Laden marks the most significant achievement to date in our nation’s effort to defeat al Qaeda.

Yet his death does not mark the end of our effort. There’s no doubt that al Qaeda will continue to pursue attacks against us. We must –- and we will -- remain vigilant at home and abroad.

As we do, we must also reaffirm that the United States is not –- and never will be -– at war with Islam. I’ve made clear, just as President Bush did shortly after 9/11, that our war is not against Islam. Bin Laden was not a Muslim leader; he was a mass murderer of Muslims. Indeed, al Qaeda has slaughtered scores of Muslims in many countries, including our own. So his demise should be welcomed by all who believe in peace and human dignity.

Over the years, I’ve repeatedly made clear that we would take action within Pakistan if we knew where bin Laden was. That is what we’ve done. But it’s important to note that our counterterrorism cooperation with Pakistan helped lead us to bin Laden and the compound where he was hiding. Indeed, bin Laden had declared war against Pakistan as well, and ordered attacks against the Pakistani people.

Tonight, I called President Zardari, and my team has also spoken with their Pakistani counterparts. They agree that this is a good and historic day for both of our nations. And going forward, it is essential that Pakistan continue to join us in the fight against al Qaeda and its affiliates.

The American people did not choose this fight. It came to our shores, and started with the senseless slaughter of our citizens. After nearly 10 years of service, struggle, and sacrifice, we know well the costs of war. These efforts weigh on me every time I, as Commander-in-Chief, have to sign a letter to a family that has lost a loved one, or look into the eyes of a service member who’s been gravely wounded.

So Americans understand the costs of war. Yet as a country, we will never tolerate our security being threatened, nor stand idly by when our people have been killed. We will be relentless in defense of our citizens and our friends and allies. We will be true to the values that make us who we are. And on nights like this one, we can say to those families who have lost loved ones to al Qaeda’s terror: Justice has been done.

Tonight, we give thanks to the countless intelligence and counterterrorism professionals who’ve worked tirelessly to achieve this outcome. The American people do not see their work, nor know their names. But tonight, they feel the satisfaction of their work and the result of their pursuit of justice.

We give thanks for the men who carried out this operation, for they exemplify the professionalism, patriotism, and unparalleled courage of those who serve our country. And they are part of a generation that has borne the heaviest share of the burden since that September day.


Finally, let me say to the families who lost loved ones on 9/11 that we have never forgotten your loss, nor wavered in our commitment to see that we do whatever it takes to prevent another attack on our shores.

And tonight, let us think back to the sense of unity that prevailed on 9/11. I know that it has, at times, frayed. Yet today’s achievement is a testament to the greatness of our country and the determination of the American people.

The cause of securing our country is not complete. But tonight, we are once again reminded that America can do whatever we set our mind to. That is the story of our history, whether it’s the pursuit of prosperity for our people, or the struggle for equality for all our citizens; our commitment to stand up for our values abroad, and our sacrifices to make the world a safer place.

Let us remember that we can do these things not just because of wealth or power, but because of who we are: one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

Thank you. May God bless you. And may God bless the United States of America.
There's the entire speech. Credit given to the troops, the SEALs who carried the operation out, and even to George W. Bush for also making it clear (along with himself) that this is not a war against Islam. Highlighted the "we" that people were missing so much in one paragraph, but it's like that in most of them. My guess is that most people who don't like the speech take issue with the fact that Pres. Obama said "Under my direction..." and "I determined...". So? He did those things. He deserves SOME of the credit. And he took it. He also gave some out. What's the big deal?

That's right: there's not a big deal. This reminds me of beating Nebraska in Lincoln a few years ago and people on here complaining that we let them outscore us in the 4th quarter. Or mudstomping some random team and people complaining that we should've run the ball more. Come on, we KILLED BIN LADEN!
 

RxCowboy

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Re: Major world news

From today's WSJ:
Too Good to Be Happy
By James Taranto

In his address last night, President Obama evoked "the sense of unity that prevailed on 9/11." It's hard to blame him: A president whose policies have been divisively ideological had accomplished something everyone could celebrate. Well, not everyone. Over at Salon, they're not happy, and they want you to know it's because they're better than you.

David Sirota scolds Americans for not responding with "somber relief":
Instead, the Washington press corps--helped by a wild-eyed throng outside the White House--insisted that unbridled euphoria is the appropriate response. And in this we see bin Laden's more enduring victory--a victory that will unfortunately last far beyond his passing.

For decades, we have held in contempt those who actively celebrate death. . . . But in the years since 9/11, we have begun vaguely mimicking those we say we despise, sometimes celebrating bloodshed against those we see as Bad Guys just as vigorously as our enemies celebrate bloodshed against innocent Americans they (wrongly) deem as Bad Guys.
Sirota has unwittingly done a public service here. He has killed off the worst post-9/11 cliché by reducing it to complete absurdity: If the terrorists lose and we're happy, the terrorists have won. Brilliant!

Also at Salon, Glenn Greenwald preens that he isn't happy:
I personally don't derive joy or an impulse to chant boastfully at the news that someone just got two bullets put in their skull--no matter who that someone is--but that reaction is inevitable: it's the classic case of raucously cheering in a movie theater when the dastardly villain finally gets his due.
Oh well, to each his own. We personally find that Greenwald's colicky mood enhances our elation.

It also reminds us of how terribly wrong Salon has been over the years. Way back in 2001, we made a note of a piece that ran there on Sept. 14 of that year, planning to use it when bin Laden was captured or killed. It's titled "An Afghan-American Speaks" and is written by Tamim Ansary:
Let me now speak with true fear and trembling. The only way to get Bin Laden is to go in there with ground troops. When people speak of "having the belly to do what needs to be done" they're thinking in terms of having the belly to kill as many as needed. Having the belly to overcome any moral qualms about killing innocent people. Let's pull our heads out of the sand. What's actually on the table is Americans dying. And not just because some Americans would die fighting their way through Afghanistan to Bin Laden's hideout. It's much bigger than that, folks. Because to get any troops to Afghanistan, we'd have to go through Pakistan. Would they let us? Not likely. The conquest of Pakistan would have to be first. Will other Muslim nations just stand by? You see where I'm going. We're flirting with a world war between Islam and the West.
And guess what: That's bin Laden's program. That's exactly what he wants. That's why he did this. Read his speeches and statements. It's all right there. He really believes Islam would beat the West. It might seem ridiculous, but he figures if he can polarize the world into Islam and the West, he's got a billion soldiers. If the West wreaks a holocaust in those lands, that's a billion people with nothing left to lose; that's even better from Bin Laden's point of view. He's probably wrong--in the end the West would win, whatever that would mean--but the war would last for years and millions would die, not just theirs but ours.
Who has the belly for that? Bin Laden does. Anyone else?
He was right about the need for ground troops, but somehow we managed to do it without conquering Pakistan, going to war with Islam, or wreaking a holocaust. Then there's this piece from 1998, after the bombing of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania:
Unless the Clinton administration can come up with some hard evidence that bin Laden is in fact calling the shots of a vast new anti-American terrorist network, all the present allegations and faceless intelligence-source leaks claiming facts too secret and explosive to be revealed should be taken with a grain of salt.
Bin Laden may be a dangerous anti-American zealot with a mouth as big as his bankroll. But the evidence so far does not support him being a cerebral Islamic Dr. No moving an army of terrorist troops on a vast world chessboard to checkmate the United States.
The author: Loren Jenkins, then and still senior foreign editor of NPR. Your tax dollars at work!
Yeah, I can live without Sirota's self-righteousness. There is good reason to be happy today.
 

steross

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"Again, this isn’t in any way to equate Americans who cheer on bin Laden’s death with, say, those who cheered after 9/11. Bin Laden was a mass murderer who had punishment coming to him, while the 9/11 victims were innocent civilians whose deaths are an unspeakable tragedy. Likewise, this isn’t to say that we should feel nothing at bin Laden’s neutralization, or that the announcement last night isn't cause for any positive feeling at all -- it most certainly is."

I guess the above part was missed.
 

RxCowboy

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"Again, this isn’t in any way to equate Americans who cheer on bin Laden’s death with, say, those who cheered after 9/11. Bin Laden was a mass murderer who had punishment coming to him, while the 9/11 victims were innocent civilians whose deaths are an unspeakable tragedy. Likewise, this isn’t to say that we should feel nothing at bin Laden’s neutralization, or that the announcement last night isn't cause for any positive feeling at all -- it most certainly is."

I guess the above part was missed.
I didn't miss it. He's better than us and wants to dictate how happy we get over the death of the world's most-wanted terrorist. I get it. I just don't have much use for his self-righteousness. If you like it, then good for you.
 

steross

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"Again, this isn’t in any way to equate Americans who cheer on bin Laden’s death with, say, those who cheered after 9/11. Bin Laden was a mass murderer who had punishment coming to him, while the 9/11 victims were innocent civilians whose deaths are an unspeakable tragedy. Likewise, this isn’t to say that we should feel nothing at bin Laden’s neutralization, or that the announcement last night isn't cause for any positive feeling at all -- it most certainly is."

I guess the above part was missed.
Nope not missed. You can't write several paragraphs attempting to demonstrate that we are "vaguely mimicking" them then brush it all away with one weak caveat paragraph. We both know what the author meant.
 

Cimarron

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Saying Obama doesn't deserve credit because he didn't fire the shot is like saying Osama is not responsible for 9/11 because he didn't fly the planes.
What exactly did Obama do other than say go ahead and take him out? I'm not saying he doesn't deserve some credit, but what do you think he deserves credit for?