oSu VS. K State Pushed to ESPN+

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

OSUCowboy787

Territorial Marshal
Dec 31, 2008
6,946
4,795
1,743
34
Keller, Texas
#41
I don't understand how ESPN is doing this. Hopefully they're paying us extra, because they aren't supposed to broadcast more than one of our games per season on ESPN+.

https://apnews.com/article/ecd675b1f70d4d1abd377aa53f495926
New ESPN deal with Big 12 lands 3 football title games
The deal calls for each school, except Texas and Oklahoma, to have one football game per season exclusively shown on ESPN+, starting in 2020. Baylor, Kansas, Kansas State and Oklahoma State will have football games on ESPN+ starting this season and Iowa State, West Virginia. TCU and Texas Tech will join them in 2020.
Probably pertains to 'home games' meaning that they can technically show half your season on espn+ if your game vs whomever is their 1 game on ESPN+
 

LS1 Z28

Territorial Marshal
Oct 30, 2007
5,029
4,032
1,743
#42
Probably pertains to 'home games' meaning that they can technically show half your season on espn+ if your game vs whomever is their 1 game on ESPN+
This will be our second home game on ESPN+. K-State is having multiple home games on ESPN+ as well. I'm not sure how this is happening unless Bowlsby caved and allowed them to broadcast as many games as they want on their app.
 
Aug 7, 2006
1,506
1,099
1,743
#43
This isn't the first time they moved one of our conference games to ESPN+. The last time K-State played here, it was on ESPN+. I seem to remember there being a loophole ESPN is using to do so, but I haven't been able to find the article that talks about that. Something like if a game isn't picked up by a network it reverts back to being 3rd tier and therefor ESPN can put it on +... or something like that.
 

Boomer.....

Territorial Marshal
Feb 15, 2007
7,629
6,289
1,743
OKC
#44
It’d be interesting to know if this is a new change in all conferences or just the Big 12 due to a lack of leadership and overall pull.
 

LS1 Z28

Territorial Marshal
Oct 30, 2007
5,029
4,032
1,743
#45
It’d be interesting to know if this is a new change in all conferences or just the Big 12 due to a lack of leadership and overall pull.
It appears that the SEC entered into an agreement with ESPN a few months ago that allows them to broadcast one non-conference game per year per school on ESPN+. I don't think that the Pac 12, ACC, or Big 10 have an agreement in place to broadcast games exclusively on ESPN+.

https://www.saturdaydownsouth.com/sec-football/espn-plus-sec-network-football-games-2021/
SEC games will air on ESPN+ for the first time ever in 2021
As part of the SEC’s new agreement with ESPN, select SEC football games will be available on ESPN+ beginning this fall. ESPN+ has the right to stream one non-conference football game per school each season kicking off in 2021. These matchups will also be simulcast on SEC Network+, with both streams accessible in the ESPN App via connected devices.
 

Boomer.....

Territorial Marshal
Feb 15, 2007
7,629
6,289
1,743
OKC
#48
Serious question, what kind of buy rates do your ppv games have? I'm assuming it's enough to cover expenses otherwise they wouldn't do it, but I'm curious to know how many fans are willing to pay that much to watch a single game on tv with commercials.
I don't know of many people who aren't willing to shell out the $40-60 each year to watch it.

I was trying to do some digging on the viewership numbers and found this article from last year which gave all sorts of information I didn't know about:

FOX SPORTS SOUTHWEST TO KEEP PPV BUY REVENUE, BUT OU CLEARLY BENEFITING FROM UNIQUE BROADCAST ARRANGEMENT

When the University of Oklahoma (OU) takes the field tomorrow night against Missouri State, the only way for Sooners fans to see the game will be to tune into SoonerSports.tv (the school’s digital network) or purchase the pay-per-view broadcast through a participating cable, satellite or telco provider. Pay-per-view distribution is nothing new to OU supporters. For the last 20+ years, Fox Sports Southwest has sold one home Oklahoma football game as a PPV event (i.e. tomorrow night’s PPV broadcast has nothing to do with any revenues lost to the Coronavirus pandemic). But with the broadcast network entitled to keep 100% of the revenue generated from PPV buys, it’s fair to wonder how OU benefits from the unique broadcast arrangement (beyond monetizing their portion of the commercial advertising inventory). Athletic Director Joe Castiglione explained that the proceeds generated from PPV sales of the ‘retained game’ help Fox Sports Southwest fund its relationship with the school (think: lucrative annual rights fee payment) and the game serves as “the impetus [for the school] to get many more events on television; it’s the motor to [the OU] institutional network.”

Our Take: To understand why the ‘retained game’ (the one home football game Big 12 schools retain the broadcast rights to) is critical to SoonerSports.tv’s existence, one should understand how the member institutions regained the rights to it in the first place. Back in 2008, when just about every Power 5 conference began exploring the viability of a conference-owned network (the B1G Network launched in ‘06), the Big 12 schools decided they wouldn’t be following suit unless the launch was done in collaboration with one of the league’s existing media partners. So, when Fox and ESPN decided not to participate (together the two networks inked a 13-year, $2.6 billion deal with the conference in ’12, taking on more Tier 1 and Tier 2 inventory in the process), they returned the schools’ Tier 3 rights (including the one football game); games and events that were not going to otherwise receive airtime (as they’re the conference’s least desirable/valuable games/events).

Without a conference-wide network, Big 12 schools were left to monetize the Tier 3 rights they clawed back on their own. Some sold them to Learfield/IMG College, while others did deals with a local RSN; Texas, in a joint venture with ESPN, launched Longhorn Network (a linear cable channel). Oklahoma went another route. In partnership with Fox Sports Southwest, the regional sports network that is currently a Sinclair Broadcast Group property, the school launched a subscription-based digital network (SoonerSports.tv) and made the ‘retained game’ its primary draw. There was just one catch: Fox Sports Southwest wanted to continue offering the ‘retained game’ via PPV, as they had been doing for years. Castiglione explained, “[Fox Sports Southwest] developed what they saw as a very good return [on those games] and [the ability to hold onto those PPV rights] likely figured into their decision to become our media partner in SoonerSports.tv.” In other words, there was no SoonerSports.tv without allowing Fox Sports Southwest to continue cashing in on the ‘retained game’.

While Fox Sports Southwest will reap all of the PPV buy revenue generated this weekend, it’s not as if Oklahoma will come away empty-handed. A pair of sources familiar with the terms of the joint venture suggested Fox Sports Southwest pays OU between $5 million and $10 million annually for rights to the ‘retained game’ and the balance of the content they carry from SoonerSports.tv (+/- 1,000 hours). OU also benefits from the exposure provided by Fox Sports Southwest and Fox Sports Oklahoma—the networks carry SoonerSports.tv programming in-market—and the school keeps nearly all of the revenue generated from the digital network (which has +/- 8,000 out-of-market subscribers). From an academic standpoint, SoonerSports.tv gives OU’s journalism students fertile training ground to hone their skills.

For comparison purposes, one media rights consultant, who asked to remain anonymous as he/she works with schools in the league, suggested there are Big 12 programs that are only able to command $700,000 or $750,000 for the broadcast rights to their retained game. So, while not an apples-to-apples comparison (because OU is including the balance of their Tier 3 inventory in the deal with Fox Sports Southwest), it’s not unreasonable to suggest that the rights fee Oklahoma receives—which doesn’t exist without the rights to the retained PPV game—is multiples greater than what their competition receives. It should be noted that as of 2018, with the launch of the Big 12 digital network on ESPN+, there is now a viable way for all member schools to monetize their Tier 3 rights.

Considering the significant revenue gap, it’s fair to wonder why other Big 12 schools have not chosen to follow OU’s path. The media rights consultant explained that direct-to-consumer digital distribution is just not a viable strategy for most universities. “OU can do it because they’re good enough at football and big enough nationally [from a relevance perspective], that they can command subscriptions and PPV buys (which incentives Fox Sports Southwest to participate),” they said. “UT aside, the rest of the schools in the conference—their content is not that premium.”

One can certainly understand why fans would be less-than-pleased to shell out $54.99 (or $79.99 for an annual subscription to SoonerSports.tv) for the right to watch OU steamroll a cupcake (and why 32K fans concurrently viewed an illegal Twitch stream of the Oklahoma/Army PPV game in 2018). But as Castiglione said, “It’s one of the underpinnings of creating SoonerSports.tv. It was our thruway to TVs everywhere.”
 
#49
That doesn't make it any more palatable to me. I am paying more than I normally would to watch something that they will soon be paying less to broadcast. Just rubs me the wrong way. Then again, I'll be at the KSU game so I guess it really doesn't affect me. Although it would be nice if streaming meant fewer commercials so I could get home before midnight.
The issue is a bit different for football because the past 10 years almost every game has made some kind of broadcast (although not always nationally when we were fox regional). But there were a lot of basketball games that didn't make TV before, so I was happy when the ESPN plus feature was added because it meant I was going to be able to watch even the obscure games. $70/year to insure I have the chance to watch every OSU football and basketball game felt pretty good to me. I am more of basketball guy, so I use the ESPN plus for other games and USA basketball games for U19 and what not.
You can also cancel in off season and get again when back in season.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Jan 14, 2007
458
177
1,593
Yukon, OK
#50
I don't know of many people who aren't willing to shell out the $40-60 each year to watch it.
The only ou alums I know refuse to buy it, and not because they're poor. They just don't see the value, they told me.
I read for years that the reason ou does the PPV is because the revenue generated from that one game covers all the non-revenue sports for the year. Not sure how much of that is true. Personally, I don't see how they can sell that idea to the fans after the SEC move is done. Everyone will KNOW that they moved for a lot more money, why do they need to hit the fans up for even more?
 
Dec 18, 2019
464
115
93
41
Central Oklahoma
#57
Not sure on the details (my wife did it all) but we have a free subscription to ESPN+ and Disney + via our Verizon phone plans. We recently added a line for my daughter so not sure if it’s all customers or just because we added a line. Also not sure how long it lasts. I wasn’t involved in the transaction and my wife doesn’t ask very good questions.
 
Sep 30, 2013
383
311
613
plus.google.com
#58
Although it would be nice if streaming meant fewer commercials so I could get home before midnight.
YES. That being said, while D1 college football is still tolerable, I can't watch D1 college basketball anymore. It feels like watching a 2+ hour commercial interspersed by occasional basketball clips (another comparison would be sitting through glorified live sports versions of those clickbait articles).

Anyway, sorry for going a bit off-topic. I just HATE paying to watch something that's basically a super-long commercial.
 
Last edited: