Probing the Secrets of the Antikythera Mechanism

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

Noven

'Neer Deez Nutz
A/V Subscriber
Sep 27, 2010
31,647
26,407
743
#1
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-17989915

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antikythera_mechanism


The secrets of one of the most remarkable technological finds from Ancient Greece have been probed for the first time using powerful X-ray imaging equipment, specially shipped to Athens.
The Antikythera Mechanism as it is known, is regarded as the world's oldest "computer" and is thought to have been used to predict solar and lunar eclipses and record dates of the ancient Olympiad. Its remains were recovered from a Roman shipwreck off the southern coast of Greece in 1901.
BBC Four's The Two-Thousand Year Old Clock will be broadcast on Thursday 10 May 2012 at 2100 BST. Or watch afterwards on BBC iPlayer.
 

NYC Poke

The Veil of Ignorance
A/V Subscriber
Sep 24, 2007
36,344
46,270
1,743
#3
The knowledge and technology of earlier civilizations amaze me.
Man, me too. I feel like a freaking genius when I can figure out how to roll something heavy on some downed logs. And I can go out to eat afterwards.

How they figured out movement of stars and stuff is really beyond me. I would have been too busy dodging dinosaurs.
 

State

Russian Bot
A/V Subscriber
Mar 15, 2007
13,358
7,939
1,743
Working on the Railroad
#4
Man, me too. I feel like a freaking genius when I can figure out how to roll something heavy on some downed logs. And I can go out to eat afterwards.

How they figured out movement of stars and stuff is really beyond me. I would have been too busy dodging dinosaurs.
I'm reminded of it so often by my kids asking me how we know the things we know and I often find I'm unable to explain it other than some dudes way back when were really smart.