What Would The End of Football Look Like?

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

Gman

Sheriff
Jul 27, 2004
2,768
200
1,693
#1
http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/7559458/cte-concussion-crisis-economic-look-end-football

Before you say that football is far too big to ever disappear, consider the history: If you look at the stocks in the Fortune 500 from 1983, for example, 40 percent of those companies no longer exist. The original version of Napster no longer exists, largely because of lawsuits. No matter how well a business matches economic conditions at one point in time, it's not a lock to be a leader in the future, and that is true for the NFL too. Sports are not immune to these pressures. In the first half of the 20th century, the three big sports were baseball, boxing, and horse racing, and today only one of those is still a marquee attraction.

The most plausible route to the death of football starts with liability suits. Precollegiate football is already sustaining 90,000 or more concussions each year. If ex-players start winning judgments, insurance companies might cease to insure colleges and high schools against football-related lawsuits.
Any location where football is the only game in town will suffer. If the Jets and Giants go, New York still has numerous other pro sports teams, Broadway, high-end shopping, skyscrapers, fine dining, and many other cultural activities. If college football dies, Norman, Oklahoma (current home to one of us), has … noodling?
 
Nov 26, 2008
4,608
1,872
743
#3
What I don't get...in boxing it's totally fine and acceptable for head injuries to occur because they know what they are getting into, but in football we've got to shut it down?
 

OSUCowboy787

Territorial Marshal
Dec 31, 2008
6,685
5,903
743
30
Keller, Texas
#6
That or, like boxing, will be marginalized to the realm of pay-per-view.
I don't think it will go to pay per view ever. People would throw such a fit that it wouldn't make sense for the networks not to air them. Plus people would just stop watching. I for 1 would not want to buy that many games at however much they would cost. ESPN would love it because people like me would just have the gamecast up all the time and not really worry about watching a video feed.
 

Celldweller7

Federal Marshal
A/V Subscriber
Jul 17, 2004
10,251
5,165
1,743
A very specific place
#7
What I don't get...in boxing it's totally fine and acceptable for head injuries to occur because they know what they are getting into, but in football we've got to shut it down?
No one boxes anymore, it took care of itself. If the head injury stuff gets more headlines, more medical backing, and especially if lawsuits get involved, will moms allow their kids to sign up for football in the coming decades?
 
Jul 19, 2011
327
72
78
70
#8
Football injuries and deaths almost killed the sport just after the turn of the century. Theodore Roosevelt led a successful movement to change the rules to make the game safer, probably saving the sport. This was before there was any scientific evidence about the long term physical effects. We may be witnessing the beginning of the end of the sport as we know it.