Covid-19

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Rack

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We hire a couple hundred thousand more epidemiologists and contract tracers and such data might be possible. Who's going to pay for it?
So you are saying that we don't track total number of deaths overall by month from one year to the next? That is surprising. She doesn't want details, just total US death comparisons (using the exact same scientific parameters) month to month pre covid vs covid...
 

RxCowboy

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So you are saying that we don't track total number of deaths overall by month from one year to the next? That is surprising. She doesn't want details, just total US death comparisons (using the exact same scientific parameters) month to month pre covid vs covid...
From Medline Plus:
Reportable diseases
Reportable diseases are diseases considered to be of great public health importance. In the United States, local, state, and national agencies (for example, county and state health departments or the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) require that these diseases be reported when they are diagnosed by doctors or laboratories.

Reporting allows for the collection of statistics that show how often the disease occurs. This helps researchers identify disease trends and track disease outbreaks. This information can help control future outbreaks.

Information
All US states have a reportable diseases list. It is the responsibility of the health care provider, not the patient, to report cases of these diseases. Many diseases on the list must also be reported to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Reportable diseases are divided into several groups:
  • Mandatory written reporting: A report of the disease must be made in writing. Examples are gonorrhea and salmonellosis.
  • Mandatory reporting by telephone: The provider must make a report by phone. Examples are rubeola (measles) and pertussis (whooping cough).
  • Report of total number of cases. Examples are chickenpox and influenza.
  • Cancer. Cancer cases are reported to the state Cancer Registry.
Diseases reportable to the CDC include:
  • Anthrax
  • Arboviral diseases (diseases caused by viruses spread by mosquitoes, sandflies, ticks, etc.) such as West Nile virus, eastern and western equine encephalitis
  • Babesiosis
  • Botulism
  • Brucellosis
  • Campylobacteriosis
  • Chancroid
  • Chickenpox
  • Chlamydia
  • Cholera
  • Coccidioidomycosis
  • Cryptosporidiosis
  • Cyclosporiasis
  • Dengue virus infections
  • Diphtheria
  • Ehrlichiosis
  • Foodborne disease outbreak
  • Giardiasis
  • Gonorrhea
  • Haemophilus influenza, invasive disease
  • Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome, post-diarrheal
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV infection
  • Influenza-related infant deaths
  • Invasive pneumococcal disease
  • Lead, elevated blood level
  • Legionnaire disease (legionellosis)
  • Leprosy
  • Leptospirosis
  • Listeriosis
  • Lyme disease
  • Malaria
  • Measles
  • Meningitis (meningococcal disease)
  • Mumps
  • Novel influenza A virus infections
  • Pertussis
  • Pesticide-related illnesses and injuries
  • Plague
  • Poliomyelitis
  • Poliovirus infection, nonparalytic
  • Psittacosis
  • Q-fever
  • Rabies (human and animal cases)
  • Rubella (including congenital syndrome)
  • Salmonella paratyphi and typhi infections
  • Salmonellosis
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus disease
  • Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)
  • Shigellosis
  • Smallpox
  • Syphilis, including congenital syphilis
  • Tetanus
  • Toxic shock syndrome (other than streptococcal)
  • Trichinellosis
  • Tuberculosis
  • Tularemia
  • Typhoid fever
  • Vancomycin intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA)
  • Vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA)
  • Vibriosis
  • Viral hemorrhagic fever (including Ebola virus, Lassa virus, among others)
  • Waterborne disease outbreak
  • Yellow fever
  • Zika virus disease and infection (including congenital)
The county or state health department will try to find the source of many of these illnesses, such as food poisoning. In the case of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs), the county or state will try to locate sexual contacts of infected people to make sure they are disease-free or are treated if they are already infected.

The information gained from reporting allows the county or state to make informed decisions and laws about activities and the environment, such as:
  • Animal control
  • Food handling
  • Immunization programs
  • Insect control
  • STD tracking
  • Water purification
The provider is required by law to report these diseases. By cooperating with state health workers, you can help them locate the source of an infection or prevent the spread of an epidemic.

---
The CDC is primarily concerned with tracking infectious diseases. All other diseases are not required to be reported. Data is tracked and reported in MMWR using modeling, getting information where we can get it.
 
May 4, 2011
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We hire a couple hundred thousand more epidemiologists and contract tracers and such data might be possible. Who's going to pay for it?
Not sure what you mean there, but CDC puts out death data by cause. They're all rough categories and get updated multiple times per year. Granted, early release stuff is usually less accurate and gets revised. For someone who knows what they're doing, you can spend a few hours and make a lot of cause of death tables.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/mortality_tables.htm#lcod_hr
 

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
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From Medline Plus:
Reportable diseases
Reportable diseases are diseases considered to be of great public health importance. In the United States, local, state, and national agencies (for example, county and state health departments or the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) require that these diseases be reported when they are diagnosed by doctors or laboratories.

Reporting allows for the collection of statistics that show how often the disease occurs. This helps researchers identify disease trends and track disease outbreaks. This information can help control future outbreaks.

Information
All US states have a reportable diseases list. It is the responsibility of the health care provider, not the patient, to report cases of these diseases. Many diseases on the list must also be reported to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Reportable diseases are divided into several groups:
  • Mandatory written reporting: A report of the disease must be made in writing. Examples are gonorrhea and salmonellosis.
  • Mandatory reporting by telephone: The provider must make a report by phone. Examples are rubeola (measles) and pertussis (whooping cough).
  • Report of total number of cases. Examples are chickenpox and influenza.
  • Cancer. Cancer cases are reported to the state Cancer Registry.
Diseases reportable to the CDC include:
  • Anthrax
  • Arboviral diseases (diseases caused by viruses spread by mosquitoes, sandflies, ticks, etc.) such as West Nile virus, eastern and western equine encephalitis
  • Babesiosis
  • Botulism
  • Brucellosis
  • Campylobacteriosis
  • Chancroid
  • Chickenpox
  • Chlamydia
  • Cholera
  • Coccidioidomycosis
  • Cryptosporidiosis
  • Cyclosporiasis
  • Dengue virus infections
  • Diphtheria
  • Ehrlichiosis
  • Foodborne disease outbreak
  • Giardiasis
  • Gonorrhea
  • Haemophilus influenza, invasive disease
  • Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome, post-diarrheal
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV infection
  • Influenza-related infant deaths
  • Invasive pneumococcal disease
  • Lead, elevated blood level
  • Legionnaire disease (legionellosis)
  • Leprosy
  • Leptospirosis
  • Listeriosis
  • Lyme disease
  • Malaria
  • Measles
  • Meningitis (meningococcal disease)
  • Mumps
  • Novel influenza A virus infections
  • Pertussis
  • Pesticide-related illnesses and injuries
  • Plague
  • Poliomyelitis
  • Poliovirus infection, nonparalytic
  • Psittacosis
  • Q-fever
  • Rabies (human and animal cases)
  • Rubella (including congenital syndrome)
  • Salmonella paratyphi and typhi infections
  • Salmonellosis
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus disease
  • Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)
  • Shigellosis
  • Smallpox
  • Syphilis, including congenital syphilis
  • Tetanus
  • Toxic shock syndrome (other than streptococcal)
  • Trichinellosis
  • Tuberculosis
  • Tularemia
  • Typhoid fever
  • Vancomycin intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA)
  • Vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA)
  • Vibriosis
  • Viral hemorrhagic fever (including Ebola virus, Lassa virus, among others)
  • Waterborne disease outbreak
  • Yellow fever
  • Zika virus disease and infection (including congenital)
The county or state health department will try to find the source of many of these illnesses, such as food poisoning. In the case of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs), the county or state will try to locate sexual contacts of infected people to make sure they are disease-free or are treated if they are already infected.

The information gained from reporting allows the county or state to make informed decisions and laws about activities and the environment, such as:
  • Animal control
  • Food handling
  • Immunization programs
  • Insect control
  • STD tracking
  • Water purification
The provider is required by law to report these diseases. By cooperating with state health workers, you can help them locate the source of an infection or prevent the spread of an epidemic.

---
The CDC is primarily concerned with tracking infectious diseases. All other diseases are not required to be reported. Data is tracked and reported in MMWR using modeling, getting information where we can get it.
She doesn't want a break down of diseases, just a flat out number of deaths. Two numbers one for month's pre covid vs now. This number would include ALL deaths not just those by diseases. That's the comparison she asked for and I might add will give us an idea of normal mortality for time periods. Do you mean to tell me we don't track ALL deaths no matter the cause (not including abortion) month to month year to year? To answer her question I would need a lack of complexity, not more of it.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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PLEASE...Don't paint people who question things with being totally insensitive assholes, we just aren't all sheep. EVERY single death is tragic, but to ask for more information about them isn't being an asshole, is wanting more information. That Is it...btw, this one has little to no open information. Certainly I understand that HIPA makes it illegal to release that information at this point. With my wife being a teacher however, there are implications to this particular death (and others tragically among children) that may emotionally impact the classroom this fall. So eventually the public is going to need more information about this specific one.

Prayers to this family in dealing with this horrible loss of a child, I cannot imagine their pain.
There are people in this forum who have said that exact thing. They deserve derision.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
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Wishing I was in Stillwater
She doesn't want a break down of diseases, just a flat out number of deaths. Two numbers one for month's pre covid vs now. This number would include ALL deaths not just those by diseases. That's the comparison she asked for and I might add will give us an idea of normal mortality for time periods. Do you mean to tell me we don't track ALL deaths no matter the cause (not including abortion) month to month year to year? To answer her question I would need a lack of complexity, not more of it.
https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/leading-causes-of-death.htm

It just simply isn't required to be reported the number of deaths, the causes of death every month so there is no way to be that granular with the data. The best you can do is look at 2017 and divide it by 12, then multiply by 6. If you do that, through June COVID-19 is the 3rd leading cause of death in the country. It went from causing zero deaths, to the 3rd leading cause.

There is also some public health data on excess deaths during the pandemic.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid19/excess_deaths.htm
 

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
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https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/leading-causes-of-death.htm

It just simply isn't required to be reported the number of deaths, the causes of death every month so there is no way to be that granular with the data. The best you can do is look at 2017 and divide it by 12, then multiply by 6. If you do that, through June COVID-19 is the 3rd leading cause of death in the country. It went from causing zero deaths, to the 3rd leading cause.

There is also some public health data on excess deaths during the pandemic.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid19/excess_deaths.htm
Thanks! I'll forward this data for her to dig into. She's just studying it academically and wants a more clear understanding sans biases. CDC is the best information I would think and should be without bias. Appreciate the help.
 

Rack

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There are people in this forum who have said that exact thing. They deserve derision.
I would agree that if someone is that insensitive they deserve derision, I just haven't seen that many insensitive people on either side in this forum...occasionally people get crass out of frustration and emotion because this thing has been very hard on all of us....but I don't think, at the core, people are this bad. It's a horrible thing that someone loses a child...I know you hate it and I would like to believe that others on this forum do as well.
 

Binman4OSU

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Memorial Hospital CEO in Florida just said they are at 103% ICU bed capacity overall. For ICU beds reserved for only COVID 19 patients their capacity is at 180%. They have set up multiple tents outside of the ER to handle the ER load.

They have converted the hospitals Auditoriums, conference rooms, and class rooms into standard hospital beds space and are treating non COVID patients there.

Said ICU capacity is up 26% since last Monday
 

PanhandleCowboy

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I will say that I don't have any first hand experience with Covid and I live in a very rural area of the country. For me, grasping all of the information from where I live is tough to do. My area went thru the spike with positive tests early on with the packing plants. The county I live in has had 32 positives and 0 deaths. I see all these numbers across the country with death rates that are way higher than the seasonal flu. I went and looked at the counties affected in my area and for some strange reason the death rate is more closer to the seasonal flu.

Beaver County OK - 32 Positives/0 Deaths
Texas County OK - 1005 Positives/6 Deaths (packing plant)
Seward County KS - 1048 Positives/2 Deaths (packing plant)
Ford County KS - 2028 Positives/10 Deaths (packing plant)
Finney County KS - 1604 Positives/10 Deaths (packing plant)

Total - 5717 Positives/28 Deaths .49% Death Rate

My area has a .49% death rate compared to the national reported percentage of around 4% (usafacts.org).

I have been to all of these counties and the percentage of mask wearing is at best 20%. Our area became national news as big hotspots, but the deaths didn't follow so now we are no longer mentioned.

Any reason why my area hasn't seen anywhere close to the same death rate?
 
Last edited:

Binman4OSU

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Any reason why my area hasn't seen anywhere close to the same death rate?
The national death rate of Meat packing workers is 9% too as announced last week by the CDC. So meat packing workers are actually seeing higher than the national avg of 4%

And also keep in mind for those who get sick to the point they require hospital care may be up to 2 weeks and then the national avg from that point on from Hospitalization to recovery OR death is an avg of 16 days. You are potentially looking at a time frame of a month to a month and a half before the trend in deaths begin to reflect the trend of positive cases.
 

PanhandleCowboy

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The national death rate of Meat packing workers is 9% too as announced last week by the CDC. So meat packing workers are actually seeing higher than the national avg of 4%

And also keep in mind for those who get sick to the point they require hospital care may be up to 2 weeks and then the national avg from that point on from Hospitalization to recovery OR death is an avg of 16 days. You are potentially looking at a time frame of a month to a month and a half before the trend in deaths begin to reflect the trend of positive cases.
The spike in the cases in the counties around me (packing plants) were back in mid-April to mid-May.

This is Dodge City (areas largest hotspot):

DC.jpg
 
May 31, 2007
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when you have an ego like this....you can't see the reality
It depends on what is meant by lying. Is omission and/or intentionally placing things out of context lying? I would argue yes, some would argue no I suppose. I can’t agree with the notion that most doctors are lying. Every single doctor I’ve spoke to IRL has given me their honest appraisal and it matches with the common sense approach I’ve been practicing.