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History of cheating

Discussion in 'Bedlam & Flame' started by OSUFan, Oct 15, 2010.

  1. OSUFan

    A/V Subscriber OSUFan Born to wear orange!

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    History of Oklahoma NCAA Major Violations

    What's the history of NCAA violations involving the University of Oklahoma football team? This includes only major violations (as listed by the NCAA) for football team. The NCAA list six major infractions by the Oklahoma football team dating back to January 1956.

    January 11, 1956 - NCAA found University of Oklahoma football team violated improper transportation; extra benefits; improper recruiting inducements.

    Result: 1 year Probation

    January 11, 1960 - NCAA found University of Oklahoma football team violated improper financial aid; improper recruiting inducements; outside fund; lack of institutional control.

    Result: 1 year Probation, 1 year post season ban, 1 year television ban

    September 20, 1973 - NCAA found University of Oklahoma football team violated extra benefits; including improper recruiting inducements; lodging, publicity and transportation; tryouts; excessive number of official visits; excessive time for official visits; in addition to academic fraud; eligibility; unethical conduct.

    Result: 2 year Probation, 2 year post season ban, 2 year television ban, one assistant football coach not allowed to recruit.

    November 11, 1980 - NCAA found University of Oklahoma football team violated improper financial aid; improper recruiting contacts, entertainment and transportation.

    Result: Publicly reprimand.

    December 19, 1988 - NCAA found University of Oklahoma football team violated improper transportation; extra benefits; complimentary tickets; improper recruiting contacts, employment, entertainment, inducements and transportation; unethical conduct; outside fund; lack of institutional control; certification of compliance.

    Result: 3 years probation; 1 year television ban; 3 years probation; Maximum of 18 initial grants for 1989-90 and 1990-91 football season. maximum of eight coaches may recruit off campus for 1989-90; OU limited to maximum of 50 official visits for 1988-89 and 1989-90; The University of Oklahoma files annual reports regarding compliance programs; University of Oklahoma must show cause why more penalties should not be imposed if institution does not remove two assistant coaches and recruiting coordinator from recruiting and disassociate one representative.

    And then the latest July 11, 2007. The NCAA Division I Committee on Infractions has penalized the University of Oklahoma for major violations in its football program.

    Source: NCAA

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    “But you also need to understand this: With Oklahoma football, history has been powerful and timeless, if sometimes tarnished… five major NCAA infraction cases in football between 1956 and 1988 - the last such case at OU - resulting in six total years of probation, five years of postseason bans and various other penalties.” ? Ron Bellamy, The Eugene Register-Guard, Dec 18, 2005

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    “Sometimes [Oklahoma] athlete janitors are credited with hours of work out of all proportion to the amount actually performed; for example, twenty athletes are regularly employed for the tasks that some of them estimate would engage half that number of non-athletes…” ? H. Bentley, J. McGovern, H. Savage, D.F. Smiley, American College Athletics, 1929

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    “A black limousine crawled along the dirt road in front of the Burris farmhouse and stopped at the end of the furrows...stepping gracefully from the sleek automobile was Jewel Ditmars, the richest woman in several counties...Jewel and her family were among the wealthiest in the state. When she wasn't counting her money, she was following her favorite football team--the Oklahoma Sooners…‘Buddy, come here,’ Jewel said. ‘I want you to meet my new friend...the new coach of the Oklahoma Sooners...This is Jim Tatum, the man who's gonna lead us to the national championship. Jim wants you in Norman. I think he has a few goodies you might be interested in.’ Buddy was invited to the Oklahoma campus for a recruiting visit. At the time the National Collegiate Athletic Association was in the process of assembling its first investigative staff, and the hounds had yet to sniff out the trail. Tatum peered across the desk at Buddy and said ‘OK, King Kong, how much you need up front?’

    ’Jeez, Coach, how 'bout a thousand now and some more later?’

    ’You got it.’ " ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “Recruits who visited the campus were led into [OU football coach Jim] Tatum’s office, where the coach was normally found sitting in his underwear, smoking a cigar. As the player took a seat across the desk, Tatum would open a deep desk drawer and say, ‘feast your eyeballs on this, big fella.’ Mountains of large bills caused eyes to pop. The slush fund, which amounted to $125,000, had been raised during the war years....During the season, players would receive twenty-five bucks for touchdowns, fifteen bucks for interceptions, and ten for fumble recoveries.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “During our session I asked [OU head coach Jim Tatum] if he had given presents to the members of the football squad during [the Gator Bowl]. He admitted he had…Knowledge of this violation placed me in a most uncomfortable quandary. From a strictly ethical point of view, I realized that I should report the violation to the conference and the National Collegiate Athletic Association, but, on the other hand…it would mean also the ruin of the university’s football program for the next few years. I finally decided to tell the regents of the university and let them decide what should be done…My suggestion apparently was not considered by the board; the unrecorded decision was to ‘keep quiet’ about what had happened…” ? former OU president George Cross, Presidents Can’t Punt

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    “On January 17, [1947, OU president George] Cross was working behind his oaken desk when he spotted a note that someone had slid beneath his office door. It stated that [OU football coach Jim] Tatum has left Norman that day for another coaching job. The anonymous author also informed Cross that Tatum had kept a large stash of cash in the bottom drawer of his desk, and it might be worth checking to see if the money was still there. Cross hurried out of his office and ran down the sidewalk toward the fieldhouse, where the coaches’ offices were located. He marched into Tatum’s dark and empty office and yanked open the right bottom drawer. The drawer was empty.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “From the records available to us it appeared that the basis for payment to the members of the football squad has been $15.00 a month plus room and board for single men and $75.00 a month for married men. But there were no records of work performed by athletes, and it seemed clear that the year’s operation had been in violation of the regulations of the conference ? in violation also of the 1946 NCAA code.” ? former OU president George Cross, Presidents Can’t Punt

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    “No one was more tightly tethered to Oklahoma football than Big Boy [OU booster E.G. Johnson]…when OU tackle Dub Wheeler’s concentration was drifting, Big Boy paid off Dub’s debts…Three years later, at the height of the recruiting battle for ‘Indian’ Jack Jacobs, Big Boy stashed the quarterback/punter at his lake house in Arkansas…Some OU players were regularly treated to ‘loans’ from Big Boy, who also picked up the tab for expensive suits at McCall’s Men Store.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “One major factor caused Bud [Wilkinson] to gravitate to Big Boy [OU booster E.G. Johnson] like a bug to a light. On the night he signed on, Johnson had promised to launch a fund-raising club to assist the football program in its quest for more national championships. He promised money galore from the big guns. The Sooners would have cash to spend on the best players…” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “[OU president] Cross was unaware at the moment that [OU assistant] Coach Gomer Jones had a vast amount of cash locked away in his desk drawer for the purpose of paying for players’ tickets. Jones paid ten times face value. He also paid ‘advances’ on ticket money if a certain star player was strapped for cash.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “It seemed to me that a winning team had done a great deal for the state of Oklahoma, but not nearly as much for the university.” ? former OU president George Cross, Presidents Can’t Punt

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    “Oklahoma and the Touchdown Club?How Does a Third-rate College Football Team Suddenly Become One of the Best in the Country?” ?headline from True Magazine, 1950

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    “As [OU president] Cross dug deeper, he learned that funny money was everywhere. There was no system of checks and balances inside the athletic department. When university administrators tried to track expenditures, they were often led down blind alleys or treated as if they had no business sticking their noses into football matters.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “Besides the largess from the [OU] Touchdown Club, which was distributed through official university channels, athletes pick up extra money by holding campus job sinecures. The job titles include janitorial services and grounds maintenance, but even the university president doesn’t pretend they work at them...” ? The New York Times, commenting on the OU athletic program, March 1951

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    “…Quintin Little, a member of the Oklahoma board of regents and a man who had opened his heart and his wallet to Sooner football. [Oilman Roy] Guffey was [OU player] Jimmy Harris’s sugar daddy and, along with paying a huge premium for game tickets, had bankrolled a trip to James K. Wilson, an expensive men’s store in Dallas, after Jimmy signed with the Sooners in the spring of ’53.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “…football fans, and some sports writers, are inclined to regard the sport as belonging more to the public than to the university and to consider football more important than anything else that goes on in the institution. An increasing number of Oklahomans thought of the university primarily in terms of the ‘Big Red’ ”. ? former OU president George Cross, Presidents Can’t Punt

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    “…Bud [Wilkinson] was known to run with a crowd of fast and rich oilmen during the offseason; tales of drinking and hanky-panky were widespread. Of course, Wilkinson kept most of his affairs quiet…Bud liked to chase women but was discreet and did most of his womanizing out of town…At midnight [prior to the 1953 OU-Texas game], an hour past the players’ bedtime, the elevator bell dinged on the eighth floor. A half-dozen players were lifted into the voyeur pose [looking through the transom]…they saw two Braniff stewardesses dressed in tight shirts, black stockings, and high heels, strolling down the hallway…The women knocked and, when Bud Wilkinson swung open that door, they eagerly entered.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “Rich Oklahoma alumni flooded the OU dressing room after the [1953 OU-Colorado] game. [OU player Merrill] Green set his helmet on a chair next to his locker and it soon was brimming with tens, twenties, fifties, and a couple of Ben Franklins. [OU booster] Doc Rountree was, as usual, the biggest contributor. The stash became so large that Green worried that someone would steal it. He didn’t shower until the locker room had cleared out, almost ninety minutes later.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “By the mid-1950s, the NCAA enforcement division had quite a large file on this illegal activity at OU. [OU president] Cross made two trips to Kansas City, hoping to dissuade executive director Walter Byers. But Byers was having nothing to do with it, citing boxes of letters accusing Oklahoma of operating a slush fund.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “As the rumors swirled about dirty laundry, [OU president] Cross called [OU coach] Wilkinson into his office and asked if money was changing hands. Wilkinson admitted that some players had been paid, that the ticket business was healthy. But he pointed out that Oklahoma was an equal opportunity employer?linemen as well as backs and end were reaping the benefits.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “…[OU president] Cross picked up the trail of Arthur Wood, an Oklahoma City accountant who was overseeing a stash of money earmarked for the football program. Wood freely admitted to Cross that he had disbursed funds for years to Bill Jennings, OU’s chief recruiter. The demand for money became so great, Wood said, that more had to be raised by the Touchdown Club. NCAA enforcers interviewed Wood, but he refused to open his books. When [NCAA executive director] Byers persisted, Wood moved himself to Reno, Nevada, in the mid-1950s, taking the financial records with him.” ? Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “The NCAA wanted to know who was responsible for the development of athletic policies at OU and who had the responsibility of making sure that approved policies were followed. Especially pointed was a question about whether a fund or funds were available for use by the Department of Athletics that were not administered by the university...Wilkinson and I had several conferences during the course of the investigation and the preparation of the report. He was undisturbed by the inquiry and assured me that his coaching staff had been following the policies of the Big Seven Conference and the NCAA ‘to the letter.’ There was nothing to fear, he said, from any detailed investigation the association might make. Bud proved to be a poor prophet. Soon we would learn that we had much to fear.” ? former OU president George Cross, Presidents Can’t Punt

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    "The alternates were in the [1955 OU-Texas] game in the third quarter and moving the ball with ease, when [OU quarterback Jay] O'Neal pitched to fullback Dennit Morris, who slid out-of-bounds at the Texas nine in a tangle of arms and legs. The side judge marked the spot by dropping his cap on the yard marker. Then he dived into the pile of bodies to retrieve the football. Along came a female Sooner cheerleader, strutting along the boundary line. She spotted the cap, stopped, looked both ways, and kicked it all the way down to the four-yard line. Returning to the field, the official marked the ball precisely where his hat now lay. The Sooners, however, were held on downs and didn't score, a sign, perhaps, that God had disapproved of the ruse. Even [head coach Bud] Wilkinson would laugh on Monday when, during the team meeting, he ran the film projector back and forth, replaying the cheerleader's devilish deed." ?Jim Dent, The Undefeated

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    “…football enthusiasts no longer had the game in proper perspective. They were placing disproportionate emphasis on the importance of not just winning but winning by overwhelming margins. I began to think it might be wholesome if OU lost a game or two.” ? former OU president George Cross, Presidents Can’t Punt

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    “Then came ‘O’ Club initiation, for all the men who had lettered in a varsity sport [during 1962-63], a terrifying ritual at Oklahoma that defied imagination…if the upperclassmen didn’t like our performance, they shocked the hell out of us with ‘hot shots,’ battery-powered cattle prods that were used to move animals. They moved humans even better. No one ever got through this day without the torture of being shocked by those things…They sat us down before a dish full of urine and garbage with orders to eat it. And we ate it, just to avoid that hot shot…A friend of mine named Steve Davis had gotten mad at one of the ‘O’ club members and took a swing at him…They shocked him so many times he passed out, so they carried him off like a dead tiger on a pole…it was a preposterous initiation, barbaric, in a way, even though some of the coaches were there watching, just to see that it didn’t get too sadistic.” ? former OU receiver Lance Rentzel, When All The Laughter Died In Sorrow

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    “OU in the early years "outbought" UT for Texas high school stars. Only later did the Sooners suffer NCAA major probations for cheating, because NCAA rules prior to 1953 wouldn't frighten a girl scout.” ? Robert Heard, writing for ESPN.com, 2001

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    “Finally [Jack] Mildren culled the list to two candidates. Oklahoma and SMU…This time, the Sooners, under first year coach Chuck Fairbanks, sealed the deal. Not only did OU obtain the services of a premier quarterback, the state of Oklahoma additionally secured the services of an excellent new director of parks administration in the form of Jack Mildren’s dad, Larry.” ? Mike Shropshire, Running With The Big Dogs

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    “On the football field last season, Oklahoma used its devastating Wishbone-T offense to win the Big Eight Conference title, the Sugar Bowl and the No. 2 ranking in the national polls. Off the field, the Sooners tried a variation on the old quarterback sneak that last week caused them to forfeit, retroactively, eight victories in which Freshman Kerry Jackson had participated. According to Big Eight investigators, Quarterback Jackson and Center Mike Phillips, who was on the freshman team, had been ineligible to play. Reason: their grade transcripts from Galveston Ball High School in Texas had been doctored?no one would say by whom?in order to qualify them for athletic scholarships.” ? Time, Apr. 30, 1973

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    “The most serious of 14 [NCAA] recruiting violations involved the doctoring of the high school transcripts of quarterback Kerry Jackson and linebacker-defensive end Mike Phillips of Galveston…Oklahoma had to forfeit the eight games in 1972 that Jackson had played in, including the one it lost ? to Colorado ? on the field…The Oklahoma football brochures continue to note forfeits in 1972, but only three of them ? to Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma State.” ? Robert Heard, Oklahoma vs Texas

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    “During one period I did use what might be called negative recruiting…”? former OU head coach Barry Switzer, Bootlegger’s Boy

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    “College coach Barry Switzer is king in Oklahoma. Here’s a disturbing glimpse at how he has kept his team number one.” Esquire magazine headline, 1978

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    “What I saw at Oklahoma was a…disturbing, often frightening glimpse of what it takes to be number one in the nation.” ? Philip Taubman, Esquire, 1978

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    “The state is infatuated with football, and Oklahomans spare nothing for their team. They want glory and will pay any price…They brook no criticism and treat anyone who questions the OU football program as a traitor. Most of all, the folks of Oklahoma revel in the success of the Sooners.” ? Philip Taubman, Esquire, 1978

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    “The other result of Oklahoma’s football fever is a college football program grossly out of control, a team and a head coach running away with a university. It is football madness, with a vengeance.” ? Philip Taubman, Esquire, 1978

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    “It’s nice to have a football team. But this is, after all, supposed to be a university. Our priorities are skewed. Football fever here has gotten to the point of obscenity.” ? OU assistant political science professor Jean McDonald, 1978

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    “Switzer is married, with three children, but that seems hardly to have cramped his style. His reputation as a ladies’ man has fueled all kinds of rumors around Oklahoma, particularly during the last year. Last spring a member of the team’s staff told friends he discovered Switzer was having an affair with his wife. The man said Switzer had paid him $25,000 hush money. Switzer vehemently denies the story saying, ‘It’s all a fabrication.’ Switzer’s accuser now refuses to discuss the matter, saying, ‘I just don’t want to hurt anyone.’ Nevertheless, the story has persisted and flourished in the hothouse atmosphere of Oklahoma. You can’t set foot in the state these days without hearing someone talk about ‘Peyton Place at OU.’ Switzer isn’t the only target. Another story holds that a member of the august board of regents is involved with an assistant coach’s wife. ” ? Philip Taubman, Esquire, 1978

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    “ ‘Another thing I’ve never understood,’ Frank [Broyles, former Arkansas coach] said, ‘is why your investigators can’t walk through a dormitory parking lot at OU and write down the license plate of those new sports cars the athletes are driving. Then you could trace the ownership and financing.’ He had hit a tender spot…Our investigators had worked hard on the car problem, and we knew there were a number in the OU parking lot…” ? Walter Byers, Unsportsmanlike Conduct: Exploiting College Athletics. Byers is the former executive director of the NCAA.

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    “[In 1976] the NCAA conducted still another investigation, this time looking into ticket scalping by OU players. No public action was taken but OU was told to stop letting players sell their season tickets at huge premiums to OU rooters. Even so, it is hard to spend any time at OU without hearing stories about continued scalping and huge profits raking in by coaches selling off large blocks of OU-Texas tickets. Priced at $10, those seats sell for as much at $300 on the black market. The revenue is supposedly plowed into illicit payments to players for such items as cars and clothes.” ? Philip Taubman, Esquire, 1978

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    “OU players could buy four tickets to each game and eight to the especially lucrative Texas game. The school sold all of the tickets to the players in advance of the season. Coaches would sell the tickets for them, and the OU-Texas tickets occasionally brought as much as $300 each. The players made $1,500 to $2,000 a year from these sales.” ? Robert Heard, Oklahoma vs Texas

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    “I’ve heard of players selling their Red River War tickets for as much as $200 each and season books for $400 to $500. Obviously, this was a windfall of $4,000 or more to players?all of it ‘illegal’ by NCAA standards…” ? former OU head coach Barry Switzer, Bootlegger’s Boy

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    “Unfavorable publicity is not something Oklahoma rooters tolerate. After Oklahoma City Times reporter Frank Boggs broke the ticket story, he was subjected to the kind of harassment most Americans thought went out with the witchhunts. Dozens of death threats were phoned in to him and his family. Fellow reporter Jack Taylor got home one day to find police guarding his house. His editors told him that the Times had received thirty threats against Taylor and Boggs that day.

    Barry Switzer diplomatically says he doesn’t condone the hysteria, but he sums up the local feeling about Sooners football and its excesses when he says, ‘If you’re a reporter, be neutral or be for us, but don’t be against us. I don’t know why anyone would want to be against us.’ ” ? Philip Taubman, Esquire, 1978

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    “Way back a million years ago when I started in this business at a tiny little newspaper, I worked for a terrific guy named Frank Boggs… At one point we wondered why Frank was working at this little newspaper in the foothills of Colorado since he'd obviously been everywhere and done everything. Gradually we heard the story.

    Frank was a legend in Oklahoma, where he was the top sports columnist. He'd even been inducted into the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame. He walked like an Oklahoman (slow and deliberate), he talked like an Oklahoman (drawling and funny), and he thought like an Oklahoman (Oklahoma was the center of the universe.)

    But at one point Frank got a story about a ticket scandal involving OU football. He broke the whole darn thing…The boosters couldn't believe that good ol' Frank had turned on the Sooners. Frank just figured it was something that had to be written.

    We heard the story a little at a time. There were death threats. Lots of them. A guy called and said he knew where Frank's kids went to school and that they just might not make it home one of these days. It went on and on.

    Finally Frank accepted a move to a smaller paper in Colorado to let the fuss die down. It took years and years…But I never forgot how they treated Frank Boggs in Oklahoma. They took a man of principal and talent like that, threatened his family and drove him out of town. All over a college football team.” ? C.W. Nevius, writing for SFgate.com, Sep. 21, 2006

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    “We’re a young state, striving for excellence, and football has been the one place where we have achieved excellence…It’s unprecedented [for] a home daily newspaper [to] assume such a petty adversary role.” ? Charles Engleman, OU regent and publisher of the Clinton News, commenting on the Daily Oklahoman’s coverage of the mid-seventies OU athletes’ ticket scalping scandal

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    “Oklahoma has not been content with just recruiting violations. Several years ago, OU was caught spying on the opposition. Though technically not a violation of NCAA rules, the spying was unethical as hell. And comically clumsy. Before an OU game against California, four Sooner rooters drove down to Dallas to sneak in on a Cal practice at Texas Stadium. Questioned at the gate, they claimed to be interior decorators working on the Lincoln-Mercury Dealers’ Association box in the stadium. I met two of the spies when I was in Oklahoma, and less likely interior decorators it’s hard to imagine. They’re both heavy, rough-looking jocks. Officials let them in, but one stupidly signed his name in the security log. When rumors started spreading, newspapermen had no trouble unraveling the case.” ? Philip Taubman, Esquire, 1978

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    “In 1976, we played California in Norman for the second game of the season. That game created another infamous ‘spying scandal.’ Lonnie Williams, who lived in Dallas, the same guy who got caught spying on Texas in earlier years, had watched California working out at Texas Stadium in Dallas and told some of our coaches what he saw.” ? former OU head coach Barry Switzer, Bootlegger’s Boy

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    “One OU spy began his work at least as far back as 1972, but Texas did not learn his identity until four years later. During the construction of the upper deck at Texas’ Memorial Stadium, the spy donned a hard had and watched ‘closed-door’ Longhorn practices from that deck before the Oklahoma game…Royal had not used a quick kick for four years, but he put it in for [the OU-UT] game. The spy saw that, and that one piece of information turned the game around. The Longhorns faced third and 16 from the own 25, trailing, 3-0, late in the third quarter, when they had the wind. Royal called for the quick kick…The Oklahoma players knew immediately. Before Texas broke its huddle, the Sooners yelled, ‘Quick kick!” …Oklahoma tackle Derland Moore, anticipating the snap and not worried at all about a run or even a pass, shot past Texas offensive tackle Jerry Sisemore and blocked the kick. The ball bounced into the end zone, where Oklahoma’s Lucious Selmon fell on it for a touchdown. The Sooners went on to win, 27-0, even though their offense scored only one touchdown.” ? Robert Heard, Oklahoma vs Texas.

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    “The '76 game dripped with drama. OU under Chuck Fairbanks and Barry Switzer had beaten Texas five straight after copying, at Switzer's suggestion to Fairbanks, the new (1968) wishbone formation that Royal used in his last victory over OU, 41-9, in 1970. Worse, Royal accused Switzer of spying on UT practices and offered $10,000 each to Switzer, defensive coordinator Larry Lacewell and the spy he named, Lonnie Williams, if they would take polygraph tests. Turned down and also ridiculed by Switzer, Royal, in an AP interview with me, called the OU coaches "sorry bastards," a phrase Okie fans chanted outside Royal's hotel room the night before the game. Lacewell later admitted the Sooners benefited from spying, and, later still, Switzer confessed it, too.” ? Robert Heard, writing for ESPN.com, 2001

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    “That’s not the way Switzer operates. It’s a rumor in the past, saying someone was watching Texas practice. If he did, he did a poor job. I died laughing when I heard it. Did they catch [the spy] in Austin this week? Last year? The year before? I know why [they haven’t caught the spy], ‘cause he didn’t do it.” ? OU assistant Larry Lacewell, 1976

    “Yeah, [UT coach Darrell Royal] was pretty right [about the spying charge]…I’m not always proud of one or two things. This is one of them.” ? former OU assistant Larry Lacewell, 1979

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    “…before the 1976 game we had our big spying scandal…it did happen…Darrell [Royal] was right to accuse us of that…I denied it happened…When Richard M. Nixon said the same thing I did, they called it Watergate.” ? former OU head coach Barry Switzer, Bootlegger’s Boy

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    “[OU president William] Banowsky, a realist, accepts his fate. ‘Given the intense devotion of the fans and the expectations of the board of regents,’ he says frankly, ‘it’s much easier to be president while we’re 8 and 0. If it were the other way around, both Barry [Switzer] and I would be looking for other jobs.’ ” ? Philip Taubman, Esquire, 1978

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    “No one in Oklahoma is going to stop Barry Switzer. President Banowsky is cowed, the faculty is powerless, and the board of regents loves to have the number-one football team in the nation. The notion of a balance between academics and athletics has been completely abandoned, and these professional football bureaucrats do what they please to enhance their reputations.” ? Philip Taubman, Esquire, 1978

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    “[Barry] Switzer wasn’t afraid of [OU president William] Banowsky…Banowsky would let Switzer run the football program like he’d always run it. It was one of the most successful in the country, so why not?” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

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    “…it’s all out of control. Seventy thousand people driving 900 miles to see a football game, rooting for us the year around, basing their whole identity on a game. It was never meant to be like that.” ? Barry Switzer to the Houston Chronicle, 1979

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    “We look at this game as though it were the national championship.” ? Barry Switzer on the 1979 OU-UT game, in the Daily Oklahoman

    “We now face the task of bouncing back to try and win the Big Eight. That is more important than beating Texas.” ? Barry Switzer to OU season ticket holders, two days after losing the 1979 OU-UT game.

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    “[Before] the Nebraska-Oklahoma rematch in the 1979 Orange Bowl, an unnamed individual handed Nebraska coaches a note pad belonging to an Oklahoma coach. Nebraska had put in a special set of plays for the game in secret workouts. The note pad contained diagrams of those plays, including the blocking assignment for each player. Lance Van Zandt, Nebraska defensive coordinator, said, ‘It had our terminology and other information in it they shouldn’t have known about. The plays, diagrammed in detail, had never been used in a game.’ Head coach Tom Osborne said, ‘What concerned me was the fact that we had never even used that formation this season ? and never with motion. Yet that note pad not only showed the play ? with motion ? but how they intended to defense it. They couldn’t have learned that from looking at the films of our past games.’ ” ? Robert Heard, Oklahoma vs Texas

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    “Switzer is not the problem at Oklahoma. He is like the point man in a lynch mob. The mob marches whether he or another leads it. He merely is one of the better lynch mob leaders. He knows how to encourage the mob to continue to be and do what makes it a mob…When Switzer leaves, another Switzer will take his place. If the new coach is not a Switzer, the mob will shove him aside and get someone who is.” ? Robert Heard, Oklahoma vs Texas, 1980

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    “After Bud Wilkinson's great career at OU, 1947-63, Okie fans, sensitive about the "outlaw" tag, argued the Sooners started winning the recruiting wars because of "tradition." There is truth to that. But it is a tradition built on cheating.” ? Robert Heard, writing for ESPN.com, 2001

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    “Injured and abused this season, [OU running back Marcus] Dupree quit the team two weeks ago and went home to Mississippi. It was not until after he left that the academic counselor for the Oklahoma athletic department, Jin Brown, told a reporter that Dupree had essentially attended no classes this year. In any case, then, why was he still on the team? ‘When we give a kid an athletic scholarship, it's to represent us in games,’ Brown said bluntly. ‘Because he doesn't cut it scholastically, how can you hold him out of games?’ ” ? Tom Callahan, Time, Oct 31, 1983

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    “ ‘Barry,’ says one OU grad, fan, season-ticket holder, and heavy contributor to the athletic fund, ‘had what people nowadays might refer to as libido issues. If there was a pretty woman in the room, Barry would hit on her. She could be sitting there with her husband?didn’t matter if it was a senator’s wife?and Barry would make his move. If anybody had a problem with that, Barry sure as hell didn’t regard it as HIS problem.’ ” ? Mike Shropshire, Running With The Big Dogs

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    “The King [Barry Switzer] is divorced and not because his wife didn’t like his cooking…The King was the ruler of Norman, Oklahoma, and he could have as much fun as he wanted?any way he wanted…For a man who was fifty-one in 1988, his life isn’t exactly a bedrock. He’s not married. He’s got a girlfriend that he has an off-and-on relationship with. He hits the town a lot, staying out late. He’s been in all kinds of business trouble all his life. He’s kind of like Gary Hart. His judgement is not always the best.” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    ***********************************************************************
    “[Barry] Switzer came to my house a bunch of times, four or five. He exceeded the number of official visits he was supposed to make (three)…” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    ***********************************************************************
    “[OU Coach Barry Switzer] frequently violated NCAA regulation by giving his own money to needy players. He also was aware of boosters violating the rules through their financial aid to players, and was responsible for this abuse by allowing the booster network to exist; but Switzer was never a person to worry much about rules.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    ***********************************************************************
    “[Barry] Switzer just turns his back and lets players fend for themselves. He never wanted to know how it was that I was living in a nice $500-a-month condo, watching a big-screen TV driving a Jeep and a Corvette, and always operating with $2,000 in my checking account. And he never asked. Neither did our athletic director, Donnie Duncan…” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “Barry Switzer did not love us; more often than not he only tolerated us. He got his position and respect in Oklahoma because of his winning record on the football field. He needed his players, and as long as our behavior did not force his hand, everything was cool.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “Somehow nothing I could do was enough to get [Barry] Switzer pissed off at me…I see the same things happening now with [OU quarterback] Jamelle Holieway. He can do no wrong for Switzer and Switzer does everything for him. Lets him drive his car, lets him use his car phone, lets him come late to practice, lets him have run of the land…I go late to meetings. Not just a few. Every meeting. Ten, twenty minutes late. Nothing happened. Switzer’s Rule was always in effect, no matter what the circumstance. If you were a great player who helped HIM look good, who helped him keep his job, you could do anything, and he let me do ANYTHING.” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “Keith [Jackson] must have been the greatest tight end in the world, playing in the dumbest place. Why’d he choose Oklahoma, where the forward pass is thrown about every eclipse? ” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “Indeed, the year before Switzer had bragged to me about how many Oklahoma football players were getting their degrees and making the dean’s list and how all-American tight end Keith Jackson had graduated in less than four years. Jackson, of course, later admitted to taking improper gifts and money from alumni while at OU, but justified it by saying, ‘Football is a business and that includes college football. When you shut down Oklahoma, you’re hurting the business all around the nation.’ ” ? Rick Telander, The Hundred Yard Lie, 1990

    **********************************************************************
    “Keith [Jackson] taught me all I needed to know about ‘freaking’ ? dealing with boosters and alumni when you attain a certain level of popularity and stature and when they want to court you…Freaking with boosters and alumni meant they showered you with gifts and money, and sometimes drugs…Keith’s attitude was that when you are offered gifts from the boosters always show some appreciation and never abuse their generosity…He didn’t always have his hand out because he believed that he would be able to return to the boosters after his career was over and, should he need it, they would help him. I watched Keith do favors for boosters and receive nothing in return.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “[OU running back] Buster Rhymes opened up his balcony door at the Bud Wilkinson Athletic Dorm and fired about a hundred and fifty rounds out of an Uzi machine gun…Of course, we had a team meeting afterward about it. The King, Barry Switzer, our head coach, was pissed. But not too pissed, I guess, because nobody got thrown in jail over it. Switzer was smart. He’d give up his fur coat before he’d lose a player over something stupid.” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “[Jackie] Cooper owned several automobile dealerships in the Oklahoma City-Norman area…Cooper joined me in the men’s room and asked me if I had a car. When I said I didn’t he said, ‘Well, why don’t you get my phone number from Keith [Jackson] and give me a call? You come on down to the lot and pick something out. And don’t worry, we’ll work something out.’ ” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “Steroids were about as common as Anacin in our locker room. I’d guess about half the guys took them just to look good?to help them buff up?and another 20 to 25 percent took them seriously to get strong and put on weight.” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “Brian [Bosworth] wasn’t the only OU player to use steroids. I knew first-hand of five players and was told by others that there were about a dozen.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “Anybody could tell the Boz [Brian Bosworth] had used steroids at some time or another just by looking at him. We coaches knew he must have taken steroids…” ? former OU head coach Barry Switzer, Bootlegger’s Boy

    **********************************************************************
    “I had always thought, growing up, that college was special; yet here I was and everyone was cheating. Whether they were NCAA rules, OU rules, or society’s rules, my coaches and instructors were demonstrating to me that they didn’t apply to good football players.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “I got everything and anything I wanted in Norman. I can hardly remember paying for a thing. ” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “My family and I got thousands of dollars from OU boosters in exchange for my spending time with them talking about football. I was their toy to show off to their friends and I cost them no more than other gadgets that are signs of success. I had yet to play in one football game for the University of Oklahoma, but there were at least ten wealthy Sooner businessmen who were prepared to help me at any time. If I sound ungrateful it’s only because I’ve learned how phony they are. You learn that once you’re no longer on the football team, you’re no longer someone they need to know.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “I had a guy?not an OU alumnus?who used to set me up…He helped me buy my ‘Vette. I got money from this guy for doing certain jobs. Like checking my mailbox once a week.” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “Another OU booster in Norman owned a car dealership, and I chose a white Buick Regal that cost about seventy-five hundred dollars. The deal was for me to put down two thousand, and have a loan taken out by a friend, in this case a former teacher at Lawton High School, for the balance. I was able to get the two thousand from a few boosters and return the same day to pick up the car. The car wasn’t in my name, but I owned it, and I didn’t give a damn…” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “Frank Vale owned a large furniture store. Whatever we needed to furnish the apartment?couches, tables, chairs, waterbed?Frank gave to us. All he wanted in return was to hang out with us and have us sing the pictures he had hanging in the windows of his store. I have no doubt about Frank’s sincere desire to help us out, but it remains a mystery why he and other wealthy businessmen went out of their way to please teenagers with whom they had little in common. It was more than supporting your neighborhood football team, when you consider that they were endangering the team by violating NCAA regulations. Even after OU was put on suspension by the NCAA in December 1988, Frank continued to wire Jamelle [Holieway] and me money from Tulsa. Of course, players like Jamelle and myself were too greedy to worry about NCAA regulations, except to make sure we didn’t get caught breaking them.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “We rarely paid for anything. Beer and booze were supplied to us by Switzer. All we had to do was go to his house and he would load up the trunk of our car…We even stopped paying rent to the landlord. All we did was go to Frank Vale or some other booster and they would make up the two hundred fifty we owed each month. We found none of this strange and, in fact, only expected things to get better. I think Jamelle’s [Holieway] greatest goal in life was to one day be an OU booster.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “When I returned from court a few days later I asked Switzer about the community work. Again, he told me not to worry about it and that Shirley Vaughn would take care of it. Shirley officially was a recruitment assistant, but she was Barry Switzer’s right-hand woman. She handled things like airline tickets, game tickets, spending money. (In December 1988, she was cited by the NCAA and fired by OU for recruitment violations.) Switzer told me that Shirley would be able to have the community service hours written off for me. When I reported to Shirley and asked her where I should go to begin the work, she told me that it was all being taken care of. That was one of the many times during my first semester that I went to her about it, and each time her answer was the same: It was being taken care of.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “The people in Oklahoma knew of his business dealings. They knew of his marital problems and his other women, including the wife of an assistant coach. They knew that and more, but were never much concerned about any of it.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “[Switzer] drank hard, loved to run around with women, and his players followed his example. He could outparty any of us. He enjoyed good wine and Scotch. When we drank with him, he put us under the table. At first, I looked up to him for it; later, his behavior puzzled me. It seems weird that a man more than twice my age was carrying on as he was, going out with women younger than my girlfriends.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “Toward the end of his tenure, acting OU president David Swank came at Barry [Switzer] with a big tut-tut. Somebody claimed to have seen Switzer in a hotel suite in Las Vegas where some people were allegedly sucking Peruvian marching powder up their noses. Switzer was indignant. Later, Switzer would reflect, ‘Well, it might have been true. I don’t know.’ ” ? Mike Shropshire, Running With The Big Dogs

    **********************************************************************
    “There were other people?alumni, ex-players, fans, people in the town?who wanted to play the Godfather or something and I’d let them. They’d come up to you and they’d want you to like them. They figured if you liked them, they fit in…Everybody was like that. OU was a winner, so they figured if they were part of it, they were winners, too.” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “Like Keith Jackson, [Brian Bosworth] advised me about the advantages of being a Sooner, especially when dealing with alumni and boosters. He told me to remember that although there was a great deal I could get from them, they were not my friends.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “There were other instructors who were boosters and showed favoritism to the athletes in their classes. Although I didn’t expect to have any difficulty in my Business Communication course, the instructor volunteered that because I was busy with football practice I would only have to complete eight of sixteen assignments.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “Everybody wanted to help. I don’t know how many traffic tickets I got out of during college. Thirty? Forty? I didn’t have to come up with a good line for the cop. All I had to do was show my license and he’d let me go. ‘Uh,’ he’d say in some dumb voice, ‘I just wanted to wish you good luck this Saturday.’ He might as well let me go because even if he wrote me the ticket, I’d just call my buddy in the district attorney’s office in Norman and say, ‘Got a ticket.’ ‘Okay, what’s the number on it?’ And that would be it. He’d call the police station and say, ‘Okay, when the Boz’s ticket comes in, lose it.’ ” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “[Jamelle Holieway] enjoyed partying and was a heavy drinker. When I started hanging around with him that spring he was into cocaine.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “We had a slight other problem on the team too: drugs. Some guys, especially some of the city guys, would freebase a lot of cocaine…freebasing on the day of the game really pissed me off.” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “I can’t deny that some of our players did use cocaine…” ? former OU head coach Barry Switzer, Bootlegger’s Boy

    **********************************************************************
    “In 1988 a former big-time linebacker, Brian Bosworth, charged that Coach Barry Switzer rented a five hundred dollar per month apartment with a big-screen TV and cars for players’ use parked outside. He recalled that some players, apparently with Switzer’s knowledge, went there regularly to use cocaine, even on the day of the game. ‘If you were a star on the University of Oklahoma team,’ he wrote, ‘you could do just about anything you wanted. You had no rules.’ Switzer roundly denied the story of the flashy, talented, but mercurial lineman who had quit Oklahoma before graduating to play in the NFL. As it turned out, these charges became merely the tip of ongoing revelations and damaging events.” ? John Sayle Watterson, College Football: History, Spectacle, Controversy

    **********************************************************************
    “For the next two weeks everyone on the football team who knew about what had happened in Jamelle’s [Holieway] room waited for the police to raid Bud Hall. Nothing happened. The girl’s father was a big booster who was friends with Switzer. When he learned about what had happened to his daughter he was furious and threatened to press charges against the whole football team. Switzer asked him to wait before pressing charges and that he would straighten out the mess. Time went by and nothing happened. There were rumors about the booster being bought off, nobody knows for certain what happened, but the matter died.” ? former OU quarterback Charles Thompson, Down and Dirty: The Life & Crimes of Oklahoma Football

    **********************************************************************
    “We want to fight because I feel this will happen again and again and again. [My daughter] thought she was safe because of who they were and where they were at…She knows they were OU players, and she thought she would be safe with them.” ? Interview with the mother of a young woman allegedly raped by OU athletes at Bud Wilkinson Hall, aired by KTVY-TV in 1989. The woman’s identity was concealed.

    *************************************************************************
    “Oklahoma: A Sordid Story ? How Barry Switzer’s Sooners Terrorized Their Campus” ? Sports Illustrated cover copy, February 27, 1989

    ***********************************************************************
    “Oklahoma has had so many players run afoul of the law that last winter one Oklahoma City newspaper toyed with the idea of running a Sooner All-Time All-Criminal Team, position by position.” ? Rick Telander, The Hundred Yard Lie, 1990.

    ***********************************************************************
    “How would you feel if you confronted the president of a major university, asked him about the recent crimes committed by his football team, and the man dismissed the actions by calling them ‘isolated incidents’? That’s what I asked Oklahoma’s interim president David Swank, the former dean of the OU Law School, and that’s how he responded. For a second I thought, jeez, maybe the guy is right, maybe I’m overreacting. Then I remembered I was asking this bespectacled professor of jurisprudence about three alleged rapes, a drug bust, and a shooting; and I recalled that Jerry Parks’s bullet had missed his teammate’s heart by three inches, and that Parks had then pointed the gun at his own head and allegedly pulled the trigger, but the gun misfired. So, except for the intervention of blind luck, there would have been a murder and a suicide to go along with the other felonies. And it all happened in just twenty-five days. Isolated incidents? Dean of the law school? The Twilight Zone?” ? Rick Telander, The Hundred Yard Lie, 1990. Swank regarded the 1988 NCAA penalties as too harsh. Swank later took a leading role with the NCAA, as chair of its Committee on Infractions for most of the 1990s, and pushed for key reforms in enforcement structure.

    ***********************************************************************
    “The special treatment afforded some Sooner athletes coupled with the revered status of the football team, has pushed some faculty members to the breaking point. ‘When we go to professional meetings, we get kidded about the latest cheating in the athletic department,’ says Alan Nicewander, chairman of the psychology department. ‘I really resent it. The stain spreads. I don’t think the acting president has accepted that. I think he’s blinded by his devotion to athletics.’ ” ? Jerry Kirschenbaum, Sports Illustrated, 1989

    ***********************************************************************
    “I’ve never seen a zoo run like [Oklahoma].” ? OU associate professor of geology Michael Engel, 1987

    ***********************************************************************
    “The fans are the main problem. Many of them, disappointed with their personal performance in life, start living their lives through the football teams and the athletes. When the the teams win, the fans win. And when the teams lose, the fans lose as individuals because they are imbued with the idea that the team is a part of them. This brings out the worst in them….What you see in Oklahoma, you see in Arkansas, you see in Alabama, you see in states that are, let us say, less developed than certain areas of the east or west coasts. There, areas may have a broader lower middle class. They are the less sophisticated places, which I think identify too emotionally with their college football teams.” ? former OU president George Cross, quoted in former OU head coach Barry Switzer, Bootlegger’s Boy
    **********************************************************************
    “The evidence suggests that the Sooner football program is an ethical wasteland. Oklahoma churns out good football teams, but can it churn out good people too?” ? Rick Telander and Robert Sullivan, Sports Illustrated, 1989

    ***********************************************************************
    “The NCAA had determined that [OU booster William] Lambert had given linebacker Kurt Kaspar the free use of a car and had paid him $6,400 for summer work that was never performed. Lambert, an oil man in Lindsay, Okla., told The Daily Oklahoman that he had employed an estimated 100 to 150 Sooner players and assistant coaches during a period of 15 years in the 1970s and ‘80s. This abundance of goodwill toward Oklahoma football came after Lambert’s release from federal prison, where he served a four-year sentence for possession of $300,000 in stolen stock certificates. ” ? Jerry Kirschenbaum, Sports Illustrated, 1989

    ***********************************************************************
    “It’s all such a scan, the summer job programs…I’ve had some other jobs worth mentioning. One year my job was to go sit in my car and watch an oil rig go up and down for four hours. I’d make $100 a day for that.” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    “Oklahoma’s concern wasn’t that the players had done wrong, but that they had raised a ruckus off the field, they had dared to make noise when they weren’t supposed to. This thing wasn’t about reform, it was about embarrassment.” ? Rick Telander commenting on the late-eighties OU football program, The Hundred Yard Lie, 1990

    **********************************************************************
    “Think about what the pursuit of football victories has done for the University of Oklahoma. On a national level, it has made the school a laughingstock, a caricature of a greedy, low-minded hick institution that can find satisfaction only in beating somebody at a violent game, sort of like a hillbilly who just loves wrasslin’ fellers till they cry ‘Uncle!’ ” ? Rick Telander, The Hundred Yard Lie, 1990

    **********************************************************************
    “I asked [former OU president Frank Horton] if he wasn’t disgusted by all the problems that have occurred with the Oklahoma football program in recent times. To my surprise, he said that he didn’t think that what was happening with any big-time football programs anywhere in the country was that unusual or reprehensible. ‘Was it sports that created these problems?’ he asked. ‘There are issues in society that sports are not exempt from. But when it’s associated with athletics, then it becomes a major issue. But it is just PART of society.’

    What about the Zarek Peters shooting? What about the quarterback selling cocaine? What about handguns and ammunition in a university athletic dorm? Are those things normal?

    ‘I don’t know that there aren’t rounds of ammunition in any dorm in America, generally,’ he replied.

    To say he wasn’t giving the responses I had expected would be an understatement.” ? Rick Telander, The Hundred Yard Lie, 1990

    **********************************************************************
    “The guys on the team always thought of [OU president Frank] Horton as a wanna-be. He
    wanted to be a player or he wanted to be a coach or he wanted to be a ball boy or something like that because he was constantly hanging around our locker room, before and after the games, and on the sideline during it. To me, that sucked. Nobody on the team wanted him there, so why was he there? We knew why. He was new on the job and wanted to show that he belonged. And there’s no better way to show the state of Oklahoma that you belong than to be taken in by the OU football team.” ? former OU linebacker Brian Bosworth, The Boz: Confessions Of A Modern Anti-Hero

    **********************************************************************
    Ted Koppel: “Before the break Rick Telander asked president David Swank of the University of Oklahoma what kind of a record Barry Switzer could bring back and, I guess the thrust of it was, still hold on to his job?was that it, Rick?”
    Rick Telander: “Yes.”
    Ted Koppel: “What do you think, Mr. Swank?”
    David Swank: “Again, I don’t see that an excellent athletic program is inconsistent with having a high-quality academic program. I don’t know that I can give a won-loss record, but I CAN tell you that we will place emphasis first on academics at the University of Oklahoma…We’re not going to tolerate people, as you say, being thrown in the slammer. I can’t tell you what record should exist.”
    Ted Koppel: “You COULD tell me that it doesn’t matter to you. That what matters, what is important to you, is what kind of an education those youngsters get, that if [Switzer] comes in with a losing record, but creates good student-athletes, you’ll be happy with him. You could say that.”
    David Swank: “Well, again, I want a top-quality athletic program…”
    ? exchange on ABC News program Nightline, March 1989

    **********************************************************************
    “I had to marvel at Swank’s refusal to say he’d accept a losing record. I figured Oklahoma fans wouldn’t be thrilled by a lousy record; after all, they’d almost ridden Switzer out of town when his teams went 7-4, 8-4, and 8-4 from 1981 to 1983. But the college president? It was plain that he was afraid that if he publicly lowered the expectations placed on Sooner football teams, the board of regents would string him up like a bad coyote.” ? Rick Telander, The Hundred Yard Lie, 1990

    **********************************************************************
    “The Sooners’ winning tradition on the field has been overshadowed by an ugly atmosphere of lawlessness.” ?Rick Telander and Robert Sullivan, Sports Illustrated, 1989

    **********************************************************************
    “Even former Sooners are beginning to turn against Switzer. On Monday, Jim Owens, co-captain of the 1949 team, said that that squad would be canceling its 40th reunion in April to express disgust and embarrassment over the recent events in Norman.” ?Rick Telander and Robert Sullivan, Sports Illustrated, 1989

    **********************************************************************
    “In September, [former OU player Brian] Bosworth, who’s now with the Seattle Seahawks, released his autobiography, ‘The Boz’ (written with SI’s Rick Reilly). It describes wanton drug use, off-the-field violence, gunplay in the dorm and other manifestations of berserk behavior by football players during his years as a Sooner. In Norman, Bosworth was derided as a vengeful muckraker?from Texas, no less. The book, said defenders of the Sooners, was full of exaggerations, if not outright lies. Three months later the NCAA released its findings, which contained, in less lively prose, some of the same things Bosworth had recounted.” ? Rick Telander and Robert Sullivan, Sports Illustrated, 1989

    **********************************************************************
    “As sure as the Sooners seemed of their own virtue, they must have had a few inklings of mischief. In the pages of his memoirs, flamboyant linebacker Brian Bosworth, class of '86, is pictured astride a white Corvette above a caption that reads, ‘Here I am at my $100-per-half-day college job watching an oil rig go up and down . . . and no heavy lifting.’ A more recent alumnus, Philadelphia Eagles rookie Keith Jackson, thought he was defending the program when he testified, ‘If a guy, an alumni, comes to you and offers you money, you're going to take it. It's happening everywhere. You can't stop it. You do it until you get caught.’…‘It's rich hearing Keith Jackson say that,’ [NCAA chief investigator David] Berst told the Washington Post, ‘after the life-style that players like him have had at Oklahoma -- private apartment, two bedrooms, fireplace in the family room, gold chains and a Porsche.’ ” ? Tom Callahan, Time, Jan. 9, 1989

    **********************************************************************
    “After receiving a tip during the weekend of Feb 11 ? 12, Switzer told [OU player Charles] Thompson on Monday that he was under investigation. However, the FBI, which reportedly photographed its alleged undercover transaction with Thompson, was hoping to break a much bigger case. It wasn’t ready to arrest Thompson, but Switzer’s warning forced the bureau’s hand and brought an important operation to a premature end…” ? Rick Telander and Robert Sullivan, Sports Illustrated, 1989

    **********************************************************************
    “Four days before Oklahoma faced Clemson in the Citrus Bowl on Jan. 2 in Orlando, Fla., Sooner assistant Scott Hill, who had earlier been reprimanded by the NCAA for recruiting improprieties and who may not recruit off-campus in 1990, engaged in what [then OU athletic director Donnie] Duncan calls ‘horseplay’ at the posh Lake Nona Golf Club. Hill ran up a $475 bar tab with other Oklahoma coaches and was involved in roughhousing that resulted in a shattered cherrywood chair and a damaged table. Hill later slammed bowl official Tony Martin into a car, bruising his cheek and chest…Not to be outdone by their coaches, a number of players trashed their rooms at the Peabody Hotel in Orlando. Switzer’s response was to upbraid the local press for reporting on the hotel incident.” ? Rick Telander and Robert Sullivan, Sports Illustrated, 1989

    **********************************************************************
    “Some observers have been wondering how bad things have to get before the NCAA steps in and shuts down the Sooners’ football program, but in fact, the NCAA is concerned only with breaches of its recruiting and academic rules, not with honest-to-goodness crime. ‘With criminal proceedings we let people with subpoena powers, people who can put people in jail, do their work,’ says NCAA enforcement director David Berst. Thus the Oklahoma football program has been fortunate that its alleged transgressions since with place on NCAA probation have been criminal; one more free pizza to a recruit, and the program could have been sent to the NCAA gallows…” ? Rick Telander and Robert Sullivan, Sports Illustrated, 1989

    **********************************************************************
    “Oklahoma's sentence for being caught on 20 varieties of recruiting violations includes a year's television blackout and two missed bowl opportunities (consider the potential revenue lost: just one Orange Bowl appearance is worth $2.75 million a team). The punishment prompted Oklahoma athletic director Donnie Duncan to blurt, ‘They wanted us, and they got us.’ Calmly, [NCAA executive director Dick] Schultz replied that he sensed "a certain amount of paranoia there.” ? Tom Callahan, Time, Jan. 9, 1989

    **********************************************************************
    “It all makes me sick…I remember how all of it started here. It was 1945 and the war had ended, and here in Oklahoma we were still feeling very depressed from those tough days that Steinbeck wrote about in ‘The Grapes of Wrath.’ At a board of regents meeting, it was suggested to me that I try to get a good football team. It would give Oklahomans a reason to have pride in the state. And it did, but I don’t think it was very good for the university.” ? former OU president George Cross, 1989

    **********************************************************************
    Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops dismissed starting defensive tackle Dusty Dvoracek from the team Friday while police investigated an incident that ended with one of Dvoracek's high school teammates in the hospital. Earlier in the day, the Sooners had suspended Dvoracek indefinitely, but Stoops announced in a statement late Friday night that Dvoracek, an All-Big 12 selection and third team All-American last season, had been dismissed…Norman police said Friday they had contacted the family of Matt Wilde, one of Dvoracek's teammates at Lake Dallas (Texas) High School. Wilde suffered a head injury either late Saturday or early Sunday. His condition was upgraded from fair to good, Paula Price, a spokeswoman for Norman Regional Hospital said Friday.” ? Associated Press, September 17, 2004

    **********************************************************************
    “The NCAA on Tuesday notified Oklahoma that it had granted a medical hardship waiver to allow defensive tackle Dusty Dvoracek to play a fifth season with the Sooners. Dvoracek, a third-team All-American last season, was kicked off the team in September after he was involved in a fight at a Norman bar in which one of his high-school friends was injured. Oklahoma last week applied for a medical hardship on Dvoracek's behalf, but it was denied by the Big 12 Conference. Upon appeal, the NCAA's reinstatement staff granted the waiver Monday. .” ?Associated Press, December 14, 2004

    **********************************************************************
    “Coach Bob Stoops said right guard J.D. Quinn, a 19-year-old arrested for driving under the influence early Nov. 1, will play against Texas A&M. Stoops said any punishment will be dealt with internally. ‘We'll deal with it as we have so many others,’ Stoops said.” ? Dallas Morning News, Nov. 9, 2005

    **********************************************************************
    “The friendly media: Only one newspaper in the state, the Oklahoman, has the manpower to cover this NCAA investigation. The Oklahoman is owned by the Gaylord family. The Sooners play football at Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium. Same Gaylords. The NCAA's allegations against Oklahoma are similar to the ones uncovered last year at Missouri. The media grilled Missouri. Oklahoma? Barely a peep.” ? Gregg Doyle, commenting on OU’s men’s basketball NCAA infractions for CBS Sportsline.com, Jan. 8, 2006.

    **********************************************************************
    “ ‘I'm not really supposed to discuss it,’ [OU freshman recruit Craig] Roark said Thursday. ‘Coach Stoops doesn't want me to discuss why I'm leaving. I don't want to say anything bad about the University of Oklahoma.’ ” ? USAToday, April 27, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “Oklahoma quarterback Rhett Bomar pleaded guilty Tuesday to a misdemeanor charge of being a minor in possession of alcohol…Oklahoma spokesman Kenny Mossman said any discipline would be handled internally and coach Bob Stoops would not have any comment.” ? Associated Press, May 31, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “Oklahoma ousts QB Bomar over improper compensation” ? USAToday headline, August 3, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “The question [REDACTED] that I’d like you to just think about for a second is, the timesheets for the summer indicated that you worked about [REDACTED] hours uhm, for the complete summer. And at a pay rate of about $10 an hour, that would get you to about [REDACTED] but for the summer, Big Red has indicated you earned [REDACTED] for that summer, so there’s a discrepancy of $2,500 and we’re just trying to get a sense of how that could be…” ? OU Associate Athletic Director Keith Gill, interviewing “unidentified player 2,” Aug 3, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “[OU’s] compliance department has come under scrutiny in the wake of the revelation that [Sooner players] Bomar and Quinn were paid for hours they did not work at a Norman car dealership. Tack on the NCAA probation recently imposed on the men's basketball program -- and the finding of a "failure in monitoring" recruiting phone calls by the compliance department -- and some have suggested OU's compliance efforts have been lacking and are in need of an overhaul.” ? George Schroeder, The Daily Oklahoman, Aug 27, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “Notable OU player dismissals during the Bob Stoops era
    April 2, 2002: Sophomore quarterback Hunter Wall is dismissed hours after Wall was arrested for burglary and possession of marijuana.
    May 4, 2002: Walk-on defensive end Claude Clayborne, a sophomore from Spiro, is dismissed following an arrest. Clayborne is charged with attempted robbery with an imitation firearm, with threatening violent action and with unlawfully carrying a weapon.
    Sept. 17, 2004: Defensive tackle Dusty Dvoracek is dismissed amid mounting allegations of violent behavior. OU head football coach Bob Stoops announced the decision in a statement released by the school. Dvoracek is re-instated the following season.
    March 30, 2006: Punter Cody Freeby was suspended and eventually dismissed from the team.
    After a practice on Owen Field, Stoops said Freeby is currently suspended for ‘academic and team reasons.’ ” ? The Daily Oklahoman, August 3, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “OU Violations Came to Light in January
    NORMAN -- Six months before Oklahoma officials dismissed two football players for NCAA violations, the details of their infractions were briefly aired on a college Web site before being removed…Meanwhile, a University of Oklahoma official hinted Monday that an investigation that led to the dismissal of OU starting quarterback Rhett Bomar began earlier than is being perceived.

    Sooner football officials needed time to assess and verify information before taking action on the dismissals, said senior associate athletics director for communications Kenny Mossman.

    ‘I don't know if people appreciate or understand that this investigation had been going on longer than it is being perceived by some," Mossman said. ‘To think we checked information just before the dismissals occurred is not the full picture.’

    Bomar and offensive lineman J.D. Quinn were dismissed Aug. 2 for receiving improper benefits from a Norman automobile dealership. Reports immediately surfaced that Big Red Sports and Imports was the car dealer supplying the paychecks for little or no work…In April, OU reported that its compliance department had undertaken an in-depth investigation into arrangements between running back Adrian Peterson and Big Red Sports and Imports. Peterson test drove a Lexus for an extended period of time and eventually returned the unpurchased vehicle.
    OU's investigation revealed no NCAA wrongdoing.” ? Omar Gillham, Tulsa World, Aug 11, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “Greg Moyer, a Sooner in 1994-97 and now a transportation planner in Orlando, Fla., said he attempted to work in the summers of 1994 and 1995. ‘I was broke,’ Moyer said. ‘[OU coach/athletic administrator] Merv Johnson, one of the nicest men I have ever met in the game, had me working at the university, gutting and painting a building. I wasn't good enough yet to be working at Big Red Sports and Imports.’ ” ? Barry Tramel, The Daily Oklahoman, Aug 28, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “While selling Keith Jackson, Switzer said he told the tight end from Little Rock that he had Billy Sims and Joe Washington and others in Norman and that he paid them $100 per hour to baby-sit. He said Tom Osborne did the same thing at Nebraska with Mike Rozier. Jackson laughed, along with the rest of the audience of 450.

    Sims came up a couple of other times, including the occasion when the Heisman Trophy winner was considering passing on his senior year at OU. What would it take to get him to stay, Switzer said he asked Sims. "Fifteen hundred dollars," was Sims' answer, he said.

    Done, Switzer said, noting Monday that the NCAA statute of limitations had expired.” ? Harry King, Arkansas News Bureau, Aug. 29, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “Oklahoma president David Boren called for the OU-Oregon game to be eliminated from the record books. The actions of school president David Boren make you wonder whether he isn't actually the booster club president instead of the guy running an institution of higher learning. ‘… The Big 12 should request that the game should not go into the record books as a win or a loss by either team in light of the level of officiating mistakes,’ Boren's letter [to the Big 12 Conference] said… ‘It is truly sad and deeply disappointing that members of our football team should be deprived of the outcome of the game that they deserved because of an inexcusable breakdown in officiating,’ Boren concluded…Is there really nothing better for the president to do at the University of Oklahoma? Like, maybe check in on the college of arts and sciences? Or, if he's that terribly concerned about the football program, perhaps he could lend a hand to the compliance office and help monitor players' jobs at local car dealerships. Y'know, make sure they actually show up and do some work. ” ? Pat Forde, ESPN.com, September 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “The seventh threatening telephone call at Gordon Riese's home came a few minutes after eight o'clock on Monday morning. It was from an Oklahoma fan who told Riese, the Pacific-10 Conference replay official from Saturday's Ducks-Sooners game, he was going to fly to Portland, find the family home, and kill Riese and his wife.” ? John Canzano, The Oregonian, Sep 20, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “Gordon Riese…will be the first to tell you that he dropped the ball big time. What's almost as sick as the death threats is Internet posters putting his home phone number online. You know, they don't list replay officials in the "book,'' the official game stat sheets, but they do list all the field officials. It makes no sense - except in this case. (By the way, he played at Portland State, not Oregon.)” -- John Hunt, The Oregonian, Sep 20, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “Linebacker Rufus Alexander, Oklahoma’s leading tackler, was arrested early Sunday on two misdemeanor charges, police said.” ? Associated Press, Oct. 16, 2006

    **********************************************************************
    “[OU athletic director Joe] Castiglione told the [Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics] that…OU is ‘about more than sports’ but that the success of its major sports programs is part of the state's psyche.” ? Chris Castell, The Daily Oklahoman, Jan 23, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “On Wednesday, national signing day, [Donald] Stephenson, the Central transfer whose injury-depleted senior season at Blue Springs helped him earn a Division I scholarship, was serving a 10-day suspension. A few weeks back, Stephenson went to a school dance, and, as he describes, ran into some ‘bad luck.’ As for Stephenson’s actions that night, Blue Springs athletic director Tim Crone says it led to a ‘discipline situation that we’re handling at school.’…But that’s not the end of Stephenson’s troubles.

    The day after Christmas, Stephenson went to a movie with two friends. The show was sold out, and, instead of sitting inside a darkened theater, Stephenson spent that night in a Leawood jail cell. Stephenson was arrested and charged with multiple counts of burglary of a motor vehicle, theft and criminal damage…Stephenson and his friends are facing eight counts of criminal activity...When Stephenson visited Norman in January, coaches didn’t talk about arrests and pending court dates, Stephenson said. They wanted to test his agility and pass stance...” ? Candace Buckner, The Kansas City Star, Feb 12, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “Three Oklahoma football players, one more than the university has previously acknowledged, may have accepted money for work they did not perform at a local car dealership, according to an NCAA document disclosed Monday...But the university maintains that only two players, Rhett Bomar and J.D. Quinn, took excess pay from Big Red Sports/Imports in Norman.

    The NCAA, in its notice of allegations, says Oklahoma failed to monitor the working relationship of its players and Big Red, particularly with booster Brad McRae, who used to run the car dealership.

    In the preliminary report OU submitted to the NCAA dated Aug. 21, 2006, the university stated that only two players ? Bomar and Quinn ? were guilty. A third, unidentified player was referenced, but aside from Bomar and Quinn, ‘all other student-athletes were paid for the number of hours worked.’…This would be the second time OU has gone before the committee in less than a year. OU officials were in front of the same panel last April for violations committed by former men's basketball coach Kelvin Sampson and his staff.” ? Brian Davis, The Dallas Morning News, Feb 12, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “The NCAA also alleges that OU failed to adequately monitor its athletes from February 2005 to March 2006 while they worked at Big Red. The school failed to follow internal policies for monitoring athletes' employment by not collecting gross earning statements, the NCAA said.
    ‘From our perspective, any allegation related to our monitoring activities, no matter how limited, is not warranted,’ Castiglione said. The school maintains that its own compliance staff discovered the violations, and the players were kicked off the team immediately.” ? Brian Davis, The Dallas Morning News, Feb 12, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “BIG RED CHRONOLOGY
    March 3, 2006: An anonymous e-mail tip to OU president David Boren outlines possible rules violations involving the football program.

    Aug. 2: OU officials announce that [Rhett] Bomar and [J.D.] Quinn were dismissed from the team for accepting money for work they did not perform at Big Red Sports/Imports, a car dealership in Norman, Okla.

    Aug. 24: Bomar writes a letter of apology to the NCAA in hopes of getting his eligibility restored.

    Late August: Bomar transfers to Sam Houston State in Huntsville, and Quinn transfers to Montana. Both are Division I-AA schools.

    Nov. 1: NCAA determines that Bomar must repay $7,406.88, and Quinn must repay $8,137.17 to a charity of their choice to reclaim their eligibility.

    Monday: OU announces its self-imposed penalties and learns it must appear before the NCAA committee on infractions on April 14.” ? The Dallas Morning News, Feb 12, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “The NCAA's notice of allegations sent to Oklahoma refers to three players who took money from Big Red ‘for work not performed.’ Previously, the university had said only two players ? Rhett Bomar and J.D. Quinn ? received excess compensation. The NCAA documents were obtained from the university Monday through an open records request. OU redacted student information to protect their privacy.” ? The Dallas Morning News, Feb 12, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “In a letter to [OU president David] Boren sent last week, NCAA director of enforcement services Julie Roe writes, ‘Your institution should understand that all of the alleged violations . . . are considered to be potential major violations of NCAA legislation.’ ” ? John E. Hoover, The Tulsa World, Feb 13, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “A University of Oklahoma walk-on football player who never saw game action earned about twice as much from a Norman, Okla., auto dealership as Rhett Bomar over roughly the same period in 2005, records show... OU maintains that only Bomar and [J.D.] Quinn were guilty of receiving excessive pay…[OU walk-on Jermaine] Hardison's name can be deciphered, along with the names of 14 other OU players, through close examination of some documents. The names include eight players on the 2006 roster…[Hardison] blamed a ‘computer glitch’ for an apparent $2,500 discrepancy between his hours indicated on time sheets and what Big Red stated he made one summer…Hardison was dismissed from the OU team about a week after Bomar and Quinn. OU stated Hardison violated unspecified team rules. Reports in the Oklahoma media linked his dismissal to a visit to a Norman casino.” ? Gary Jacobson, The Dallas Morning News, Feb 14, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “Oklahoma senior associate athletics director Keith Gill is leaving the Sooners for an expanded position at American University. Gill, at OU since August 2004, will be director of athletics and recreation at the Washington, D.C., school, effective June 1. With the Sooners, Gill specializes in compliance, working closely with the NCAA and Big 12 Conference while monitoring institutional and athletic department policy.” ? John Helsley, The Daily Oklahoman, Mar. 23, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “…Player names were redacted from the materials released Friday, but two lists show 17 players worked at Big Red during the period investigated… As part of its preparation for the April meeting, the NCAA requested and received a review of OU's televised game commitments for the next three seasons.” ? Gary Jacobson, The Dallas Morning News, Mar. 30, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “…the NCAA argues that ‘despite Big Red's unique status by virtue of employing numerous football student-athletes (17 from the summer of 2002 through the spring of '06), the institution did not detect, and therefore did not monitor, football student-athletes who worked at Big Red’ over the time the violations occurred… A ruling against the Sooners would likely lead to penalties beyond those already self-imposed by OU -- the dismissal of Bomar and Quinn, a minor off-campus recruiting restriction, and the disassociation with Big Red among them.” ? Guerin Emig, Tulsa World, Mar. 31, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “In the first public comments by [former Sooner J.D.] Quinn or Rhett Bomar on the topic of their expulsion from the OU football team since leaving Norman last year, Quinn on Monday said he understands why he and Bomar were kicked off the team for accepting more than $15,000 between them for work not performed while employed at a Norman car dealership. But Quinn said he didn't agree with the punishment. ‘All I did was take cash,’ Quinn said. ‘I didn't break any laws and I get kicked off the team, but there's people on the team that are breaking laws and failing drug tests and stuff like that, and there's nobody getting kicked off the team for that type of stuff.’… OU's report to the NCAA in February and its response last week to the NCAA's notice of allegations implicated Bomar and Quinn as conspirators with former Big Red general manager Brad McRae in the scam. In the Monday interview, Quinn adamantly denied a conspiracy took place. ” ? John E. Hoover, The Tulsa World, Apr. 4, 2007

    **********************************************************************
    “Ooooo-klahoma, where the wins come sweepin' down the plain … followed closely by the hot pursuit breeze of player scandals, internal investigations, NCAA probes, and, possibly, probation. Call it the ‘Full Switzer.’ The Sooners football program does have that retro look, harkening back to those heady Barry Switzer days when the soothing sound of Uzis being fired off dorm roofs gently rocked players to sleep. The Big Red Sports/Imports scandal continues to leave Sooners officials crimson-faced. Brad McRae, the former manager at the car dealership, already had been accused of paying players for not working. Now comes a Dallas Morning News report that players joke about how Big Red was the Big Easy and claim they took home cars… McRae has denied letting [OU walk-on Jermaine] Hardison take home cars. ‘If he did, he stole 'em,’ McRae said. Well, if he did, then Hardison apparently could be the lead in the "Gone in Sixty Seconds" remake. ‘Every two to three weeks he had a different car,’ [former Hardison roommate Logan] Brosky said. Under self-imposed penalties, Oklahoma officials have banned McRae from contact with the university until August 2011. So mark your calendars. The Sooners' next national title: 2013. The Sooners' next NCAA investigation: 2015.” ? Chris Foster, The Los Angeles Times, Apr. 7, 2007

    *************************************************************
    NORMAN, Okla. -- Police arrested a University of Oklahoma freshman football player early Friday on an accusation that he tried to steal gasoline from a convenience store pump.
    Ryan Broyles, 19, was booked into the Cleveland County Detention Center at 12:10 a.m. on attempted larceny accusations and was released at 3:44 a.m. after posting $200 cash bond.
    A police officer saw him at a closed gasoline station. He had a key and codes with which the pump could be activated, police Capt. Leonard Judy said. The key was in the pump.
    The officer contacted the owner of the business, former Norman Mayor Ron Henderson, and confirmed that Broyles did not work there and never has.
    By overriding the pump's access code, gasoline can be pumped without the electronic meter detecting it, Henderson told The Oklahoman. The difference between the meter and actual inventory, he said, wouldn't be known until someone manually took a tank reading.
    "We've been experiencing shortages for several months and we've been trying to figure out where the problem might be," Henderson said. "We thought maybe we're losing gas in the tanks or in the underground lines. Never once did we dream it could be theft related."
    Henderson said he is unsure how anyone could get a key because neither he nor his employees have one. He also said he doesn't know whether the alleged attempt was an isolated incident.
    Henderson said his tanks were tested for leaks to come up with a cause for the gasoline losses.
    A juvenile who was in the vehicle with Broyles was cited for a curfew violation, police said.
    Broyles was an all-state selection at Norman High School last season. He had 44 receptions of 908 yards and rushed for 345. He also scored 20 touchdowns. Broyles was listed as the second-team wide receiver on OU's depth chart for Saturday's season opener against North Texas.
    "We are aware of a matter involving Ryan Broyles," coach Bob Stoops said in a statement. "Effective immediately, Ryan is suspended from the team for an indefinite period of time. I take very seriously the conduct of our players, and I will not compromise my expectations for anyone associated with our program."
    Broyles orally committed to play at Oklahoma State in the fall but changed his mind in the week leading up to signing day.

    **************************************************************

    Ryan Broyles receives deferred sentence and $100 fine: Update: Ryan Broyles arrested... Although they tried, Norman police investigators said Monday they never learned how a suspended University of Oklahoma football player got a key and an override code to a gas pump at a city convenience store. Ryan Broyles, 19, pleaded no contest in Cleveland County District Court Friday to a misdemeanor count of attempted petty larceny, effectively ending their investigation, Capt. Leonard Judy said. In an unscheduled court appearance, Broyles entered the plea before Special District Judge Reg Gaston. Gaston placed Broyles on a six-month deferred sentence and fined him $100. "Without anything further to go on, we essentially came to a dead end," Judy said, implying that Broyles never told investigators how a key and code came into his possession. (NewsOK.com)

    -------------------

    You gooners keep cheating I am going to have to get a terabyte external hard drive to keep it all.
  2. Jonkr06

    Jonkr06 Cowboy

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    Did there really need to be another thread made about this? Probably could have just bumped one of the 100 other ones.
  3. OSUFan

    A/V Subscriber OSUFan Born to wear orange!

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    Yes! Always need to remind the gooners with as many threads as we can make where their success comes from.
  4. rogue status

    rogue status Wrangler

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    I scrolled alllll the way down on my phone to reply. I had NO idea all these shameful things have gone on at my alma mater. I hearby renounce my Sooner fan-hood! Yall have any room for a semi-reformed Goon?
  5. Roman Craig

    A/V Subscriber Roman Craig Race Ya Home!

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    No.


    This is a country club and only members are allowed!

    Ask Voddumb.





    :D
    Cowboy2U likes this.
  6. MSteph57

    A/V Subscriber MSteph57 Cowboy

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    IT'S A TRAP!!!!

    If this is for realz I suggest getting all of your polo shirts and sweater vests to the dry cleaners. Preferably international dry cleaners. It's the new deal among country club members...:D
  7. BeatOU

    Staff A/V Subscriber BeatOU GGBTW

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  8. rogue status

    rogue status Wrangler

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    hahaha @ trap.
  9. POKEaLOT

    POKEaLOT Wrangler

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    tell me something i didnt know....
  10. Lafferty Daniel

    A/V Subscriber Lafferty Daniel Cowboy

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    ...I open mouth kissed a horse once....
    OStateBass11 and NYC Poke like this.
  11. rwills9980

    rwills9980 Wrangler

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    And some people wonder why OSU fans get labeled with being more concerned with OU than their own team.
  12. OSUFan

    A/V Subscriber OSUFan Born to wear orange!

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    Only taking notes. That's all.
  13. Cardsfan08

    Cardsfan08 Greenhorn

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    That was really long and full of goodness.

    Cue the jokes
  14. OSUFan

    A/V Subscriber OSUFan Born to wear orange!

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  15. Midnight Toker

    Midnight Toker Wrangler

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    I didn't even know OU existed until nearly 20 years ago. So none of that stuff ever registered. I saw a bad team, liked them, and have liked 'em since. Yep they cheated. But nope, they dont cheat. Yep, OSU has cheated, and I also believe they no longer do. And soon all the other cheaters will be coming out of the woodwork.
  16. OSUCHOCTAW

    OSUCHOCTAW Wrangler

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    tarp?
  17. Noven

    A/V Subscriber Noven Devil Incarnate

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    And the media love OU. You should email that to a bunch of national papers.
  18. Sooners11

    Sooners11 Banned to Bedlam & Flame

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    Not sure what part of that is cheating. There were introductions made, that's not against the rules.
  19. OSUFan

    A/V Subscriber OSUFan Born to wear orange!

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    Ask Vodick2. He seems to think OSU cheated with Dez Bryant. Just applying the same rules.
  20. OUMagic04

    OUMagic04 Banned to Bedlam & Flame

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    An no mention of any osu cheating????? WOW.....The last time you guys got popped you almost landed on the death penalty......Where is that in your long line of postings?

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