Trump rips Kavanaugh in new Michael Wolff book

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Binman4OSU

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Stupid about AGW!!
#1
Michael Wolff sit with Trump for an interview in his new book called Landslide. Wolff asked Trump about Kavanaugh and lets say Trump isn't happy with him.

In an interview with Michael Wolff for his new book, Landslide, Trump told the journalist he is very upset with Kavanaugh’s record so far, arguing he doesn’t have “the courage you need to be a great justice.”
Kavanaugh, along with other Trump nominees Justices Amy Coney Barrett and Neil Gorsuch, joined the majority to reject a Texas lawsuit in December that sought to overturn the election.
The decision enraged Trump, who reportedly harbored particular animosity toward Kavanaugh, whom he feels like he “saved,” according to Wolff.
Trump said Kavanaugh was “totally disgraced” by the sexual assault allegations levied against him during his confirmation hearings in 2018 and would have been rejected by the Senate had he not defended him.
The former president said he is upset with a number of Kavanaugh rulings, saying he’s “basing” his criticism “on more than just the election.”
CRUCIAL QUOTE
“I saved his life,” Trump said of Kavanaugh. “He wouldn't even be in a law firm. Who would have had him? Nobody. Totally disgraced. Only I saved him.”


https://www.forbes.com/sites/thrive...MainTwitter&utm_medium=social&sh=4456a0822380
 

TheMonkey

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#2
Michael Wolff sit with Trump for an interview in his new book called Landslide. Wolff asked Trump about Kavanaugh and lets say Trump isn't happy with him.

In an interview with Michael Wolff for his new book, Landslide, Trump told the journalist he is very upset with Kavanaugh’s record so far, arguing he doesn’t have “the courage you need to be a great justice.”
Kavanaugh, along with other Trump nominees Justices Amy Coney Barrett and Neil Gorsuch, joined the majority to reject a Texas lawsuit in December that sought to overturn the election.
The decision enraged Trump, who reportedly harbored particular animosity toward Kavanaugh, whom he feels like he “saved,” according to Wolff.
Trump said Kavanaugh was “totally disgraced” by the sexual assault allegations levied against him during his confirmation hearings in 2018 and would have been rejected by the Senate had he not defended him.
The former president said he is upset with a number of Kavanaugh rulings, saying he’s “basing” his criticism “on more than just the election.”
CRUCIAL QUOTE
“I saved his life,” Trump said of Kavanaugh. “He wouldn't even be in a law firm. Who would have had him? Nobody. Totally disgraced. Only I saved him.”


https://www.forbes.com/sites/thrive...MainTwitter&utm_medium=social&sh=4456a0822380
I’m reading “How Democracies Die” currently. It’s amazing how Trump doesn’t even really disguise what he was trying to do.
 

UrbanCowboy1

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#3
Michael Wolff sit with Trump for an interview in his new book called Landslide. Wolff asked Trump about Kavanaugh and lets say Trump isn't happy with him.

In an interview with Michael Wolff for his new book, Landslide, Trump told the journalist he is very upset with Kavanaugh’s record so far, arguing he doesn’t have “the courage you need to be a great justice.”
Kavanaugh, along with other Trump nominees Justices Amy Coney Barrett and Neil Gorsuch, joined the majority to reject a Texas lawsuit in December that sought to overturn the election.
The decision enraged Trump, who reportedly harbored particular animosity toward Kavanaugh, whom he feels like he “saved,” according to Wolff.
Trump said Kavanaugh was “totally disgraced” by the sexual assault allegations levied against him during his confirmation hearings in 2018 and would have been rejected by the Senate had he not defended him.
The former president said he is upset with a number of Kavanaugh rulings, saying he’s “basing” his criticism “on more than just the election.”
CRUCIAL QUOTE
“I saved his life,” Trump said of Kavanaugh. “He wouldn't even be in a law firm. Who would have had him? Nobody. Totally disgraced. Only I saved him.”


https://www.forbes.com/sites/thrive...MainTwitter&utm_medium=social&sh=4456a0822380
There's your guy, Trump worshippers. There's your guy. The man who sparked the end of 250 years of peaceful transitions of power between presidents. I hope you're happy, at least.
 
Sep 6, 2012
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Edmond
#4
There's your guy, Trump worshippers. There's your guy. The man who sparked the end of 250 years of peaceful transitions of power between presidents. I hope you're happy, at least.
wait, what
FDR to Hoover? Polk and Tyler in the 1865 , Lincoln to buchanan was one of the worst in 1860.

Dwight D. Eisenhower severed diplomatic relations with Cuba in January 1961, shortly before John F. Kennedy took his place, and had already set in motion what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion.

Obama, Trump and the History of Presidential Transitions | Time
For instance, while Trump and Obama talked for 90 minutes, defeated incumbent Herbert Hoover is said to have refused to talk directly to President-elect Franklin Delano Roosevelt during their first meeting after the 1932 election. Instead, the sitting president spoke only to FDR’s aide Raymond Moley, according to one account. He brought in his Treasury Secretary to lecture the incoming President on “the importance of the gold standard, the stability of the banking system and the problem of Europe’s war debt,” as TIME has previously reported. While Obama said he was “encouraged” by his “excellent” discussion with Trump, Hoover described Roosevelt as “very badly informed and of comparably little vision.” (Roosevelt, for his part, had called Hoover a “fat, timid capon” during the campaign.)


But the history of tumultuous presidential transitions is even older than that.

Take the election of 1800, in which Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson defeated the second president John Adams, his friend-turned-rival and a Federalist. On the surface, the 1801 inauguration appeared to go smoothly. It was celebrated at the time, and has continued to be commended, as what Jefferson called the “revolution of 1800”: the first modern example of one party peacefully ceding power to another. But at the same time, the departing Adams made “so-called ‘midnight appointments’ of Federalist judges and court officials” and did not attend Jefferson’s inauguration, according to CQ. The dispute over those last-minute hirings would go all the way to the Supreme Court, resulting in the landmark case Marbury v. Madison.


Hell Obama to Trump wasn't peaceful either

Not My President, Not Now, Not Ever (nytimes.com)

Clinton to bush?
 
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TheMonkey

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#5
wait, what
FDR to Hoover? Polk and Tyler in the 1865 , Lincoln to buchanan was one of the worst in 1860.

Dwight D. Eisenhower severed diplomatic relations with Cuba in January 1961, shortly before John F. Kennedy took his place, and had already set in motion what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion.

Obama, Trump and the History of Presidential Transitions | Time
For instance, while Trump and Obama talked for 90 minutes, defeated incumbent Herbert Hoover is said to have refused to talk directly to President-elect Franklin Delano Roosevelt during their first meeting after the 1932 election. Instead, the sitting president spoke only to FDR’s aide Raymond Moley, according to one account. He brought in his Treasury Secretary to lecture the incoming President on “the importance of the gold standard, the stability of the banking system and the problem of Europe’s war debt,” as TIME has previously reported. While Obama said he was “encouraged” by his “excellent” discussion with Trump, Hoover described Roosevelt as “very badly informed and of comparably little vision.” (Roosevelt, for his part, had called Hoover a “fat, timid capon” during the campaign.)


But the history of tumultuous presidential transitions is even older than that.

Take the election of 1800, in which Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson defeated the second president John Adams, his friend-turned-rival and a Federalist. On the surface, the 1801 inauguration appeared to go smoothly. It was celebrated at the time, and has continued to be commended, as what Jefferson called the “revolution of 1800”: the first modern example of one party peacefully ceding power to another. But at the same time, the departing Adams made “so-called ‘midnight appointments’ of Federalist judges and court officials” and did not attend Jefferson’s inauguration, according to CQ. The dispute over those last-minute hirings would go all the way to the Supreme Court, resulting in the landmark case Marbury v. Madison.


Hell Obama to Trump wasn't peaceful either

Not My President, Not Now, Not Ever (nytimes.com)
Not even in the same category. None of it. Sorry.

How many of these instances climaxed with a raid on the Capitol building as the election was being certified… or anything even close to that? Only one transition earned that black mark.
 
Sep 6, 2012
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#7
Not even in the same category. None of it. Sorry. How many of the instances climaxed with a raid on the Capitol building as the election was being certified… or anything even close to that? Only one transition earned that black mark.
He didn't say close , he said
The man who sparked the end of 250 years of peaceful transitions of power between presidents. I hope you're happy, at least.
I then posted examples of others. Lincoln didn't even talk to Buchanan. That was what ? 160 years ago. You should brush up on reading comprehension.
 

TheMonkey

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He didn't say close , he said

I then posted examples of others. Lincoln didn't even talk to Buchanan. That was what ? 160 years ago. You should brush up on reading comprehension.
I completely followed your logic. I just found it entirely flawed.

Your examples aren’t violent. Rude? Disrespectful? Spiteful? Perhaps… but not violent.
 
Sep 6, 2012
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#13
It’s true. Dude, it WAS one of the longest-standing tenets of our democracy.
Its not true "dude".

They just didn't have the media we have now . Read about Lincoln's transition. I'm not saying anything is the worst, its just not the first in 250 years.
 
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cowboyinexile

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#14
How do you end 250 years of peaceful transitions, when there has been many before trump. That is a bold statement.
They really have been. You gave some examples but they were all bush league partisan or personal griping.

At no point did the losing party refuse to accept the election results. 2000 is an example. It came down to a handful of votes in one state that was fought to the Supreme Court. The minute Gore knew it was over he conceded. 1824 and 1876 had to be decided by the House and neither are considered that important. I'm sure at the time the losing party was pissed but no one tried to storm the capitol and assassinate political opponents over it. The biggest historical event from a transition of power/removal of a President was the impeachment of Johnson. And reading about it now, it was basically what happened to Clinton. One party had power in the house and had a bone to pick. The other party had power in the Senate and it ended up being political theater.

I don't know how you can spin this as normal. In our lifetime we have had two way more close elections including one that was decided by under 1000 votes and no one stormed the capitol over it. Historically we have had elections that were decided by politicians and not the voice of the people, and one that literally tore the country apart, but no one stormed the capitol.

This was an unprecedented event. There were people there along for the ride, but there were people there who legitimately thought they were going to overthrow the government. That is insane and is something that shouldn't be downplayed.
 
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#15
They really have been. You gave some examples but they were all bush league partisan or personal griping.

At no point did the losing party refuse to accept the election results. 2000 is an example. It came down to a handful of votes in one state that was fought to the Supreme Court. The minute Gore knew it was over he conceded. 1824 and 1876 had to be decided by the House and neither are considered that important. I'm sure at the time the losing party was pissed but no one tried to storm the capitol and assassinate political opponents over it. The biggest historical event from a transition of power/removal of a President was the impeachment of Johnson. And reading about it now, it was basically what happened to Clinton. One party had power in the house and had a bone to pick. The other party had power in the Senate and it ended up being political theater.

I don't know how you can spin this as normal. In our lifetime we have had two way more close elections including one that was decided by under 1000 votes and no one stormed the capitol over it. Historically we have had elections that were decided by politicians and not the voice of the people, and one that literally tore the country apart, but no one stormed the capitol.

This was an unprecedented event. There were people there along for the ride, but there were people there who legitimately thought they were going to overthrow the government. That is insane and is something that shouldn't be downplayed.
The civil war was bush league? American Civil War - Wikipedia
 
Sep 6, 2012
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#17
So, you are saying this is normal but are using the civil war as an example?
no I'm saying its not the only one. Is what happened on jan 6th good, hell no. I voted for neither candidate, I haven't voted for a winning president since Bush. I vote libertarian now and have since Johnson in '12
 

cowboyinexile

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#18
no I'm saying its not the only one. Is what happened on jan 6th good, hell no. I voted for neither candidate, I haven't voted for a winning president since Bush. I vote libertarian now and have since Johnson in '12
You mentioned Jan 6th. Which one was so big that history remembers it by the date?

Which one led to an occupying force in the capitol? The closest we have seen there is the War of 1812 when the British burned the White House. History definitely remembers that one. I don't know of another time when we saw something like that.

Please stop downplaying what happened. It was a historical event.
 
Sep 6, 2012
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#19
You mentioned Jan 6th. Which one was so big that history remembers it by the date?

Which one led to an occupying force in the capitol? The closest we have seen there is the War of 1812 when the British burned the White House. History definitely remembers that one. I don't know of another time when we saw something like that.

Please stop downplaying what happened. It was a historical event.
where did I down play it, I said it was not the only one. the poster that this all spawned from said it, had not happened in 250 years. That is factually incorrect.
 

cowboyinexile

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#20
where did I down play it, I said it was not the only one. the poster that this all spawned from said it, had not happened in 250 years. That is factually incorrect.
It is though. In 250 years no matter our differences we have had smooth elections. Even when the outcome literally tore our country apart the actual election didn't have concerns over people trying to storm the capitol. Your examples were watered down things that no one remembers.

What happened 6 months ago was unprecedented. That isn't an opinion. If you are trying to downplay it because that is what the news is telling you to do, my advice is to find a different news source.